Students on scaffolding at Balliol

first_imgStudents of the college have been found by night-porters to be able to access the scaffolding from their rooms, without setting off the alarms on the lowest level of the construction.These alarms are in place to stop poeple gaining access to the college buildings from the street. However, the college has organised for the rest of the scaffolding to be alarmed so that anyone attempting to mount the scaffolding from higher up will trigger the alarm and summon a porter.The email from Douglas Dupree states that, “Once the alarm is in place the College will have to react seriously to anyone who violates this notice (and consider this email as due notice) that the scaffolding is OFF LIMITS. So be warned, for your own safety sake. Stay off the scaffolding. It is dangerous.”However, a lot of students are annoyed about the presence of the scaffolding, which is causing much inconvenience to those living in the building. A third-year at Balliol who declined to be named said, “We were told there would be issues with light and noise (which are actually worse than was stated), but nobody warned me that I would open my curtains and frequently have several men see me in my underwear. I have to decide between feeling comfortable in my room or having the curtains open and being able to actually see what I’m doing.”last_img read more

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Student peer-to-peer eco program celebrates 10-year anniversary

first_imgStudents have always been the driving force behind Harvard’s leadership on sustainability, pushing the University to establish a greenhouse gas reduction goal and launching new programs like the Harvard Community Garden.This year, one of Harvard’s most successful and widely replicated sustainability programs – the Resource Efficiency Program (REP) — celebrated its 10 year anniversary of working inside the undergraduate Houses to raise environmental awareness and engage students in eco-friendly activities.In fall 2002, John Hsu ’03, Rachelle Gould ’03, and Wendy Liu ’03 approached the Faculty of Arts & Sciences Office of Physical Resources, Harvard’s Green Campus Initiative (now Harvard Office for Sustainability), University Operations Services, and Environmental Action Committee to advocate for the creation of Harvard’s first peer-to-peer environmental education program. Their vision was to implement dorm-based ecological education programs and energy-efficiency and waste recycling measures, targeting all 6600 undergraduate students.“We wanted to steer away from gloom and doom and didn’t want to talk at students. Instead, we were striving to create a peer-to-peer program that would make people feel part of a larger social community,” said Gould when contacted earlier this year and asked to reflect on the creation of REP.last_img read more

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New Online Support Search: Pilot for Select Countries

first_imgAt Dell EMC, we are committed to finding ways to continuously improve our customer’s service and support experience. A key element in that process is working in conjunction with our customers to identify and prioritize key process and functionality improvements, particularly with our online support tools & technologies.Users of our Online Support site execute an average of 650,000 searches per month. 25% of users go directly to Search before they take any other action on the site. It’s clear that Dell EMC Online Support users want to quickly find information and resources that will help them maximize the productivity of their IT infrastructure, optimize product performance, and troubleshoot any issues that may arise.On November 18, 2017, we are piloting a new Online Support Search to users in Australia and Ireland. Users in these countries will notice a slightly different look to their Online Support Search experience as well as some additional enhancements:Faster results – Now, it takes less than 2 seconds for search results to populate. That’s more than 33% faster!Improved filters – Narrowing your result is now simpler with clearer, sequential picklist selections (e.g. Product > Product Family > Product Model).New searching behavior – A slight change to the previous search, a space now behaves as a wildcard search (formerly “*”). In addition, the search field will autocomplete frequent recent searches.Expanded content access – with the ‘Search Dell Support’ button, users will now be able to easily navigate between the Dell EMC and Dell support search experience, bringing customers closer to a unified online support experience.During this pilot, the Dell EMC Online Support Team will actively survey customers and track feedback to continue to refine the Online Support Search experience and determine a timeline to implement the new search to all users globally. Stay tuned!Please continue to ask questions and provide feedback via the Online Support Site Help and Feedback form.Stephanie PirrongDell EMC Services MarketingFollow Us @DellEMCSupportlast_img read more

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Broadway.com Summer Camp, Day 16! Get Schooled in Apple Biting & Sas by Rachelle Rak

first_img WHY WE LOVE IT This masterpiece is a permanent fixture in the Broadway.com Summer Camp Hall of Fame. It has everything: Homages to Flashdance, Ghost and Rocky and more dance-offs in four minutes than we ever thought possible. Plus, it has all of Broadway powerhouse Rachelle Rak’s iconic moves, including bite the apple, cha-cha-puus and the legendary cooter slam—performed full out with startling ease by Legally Blonde and Chicago alum Dani Spieler. OVERALL CAMP FACTOR Forever 41 with a dash of cha-cha-puus and a whole lotta jughz and swirl. MOST GIF-ABLE MOMENT We’re gonna be honest: Things around the Broadway.com offices have gotten really boring the last few weeks. It’s sweltering, it’s humid, and worst of all, no new Broadway shows open until after Labor Day. But never fear, dear readers, we’ve got a great way to spice up the month of August: Broadway.com Summer Camp! Each day for 31 days, we’re highlighting the campiest, craziest, wildest—and did we mention campiest?—videos we can find. Put on your gaudy bathing suit and dive in!center_img View Comments LOOK OUT FOR… 3:10: “Oww!” “Come on honey, tell it to my hip!”last_img read more

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Monumental Momentum

first_imgWhat will be President Obama’s legacy? The Affordable Care Act? The death of Osama bin Laden? Or perhaps his public lands legacy. President Obama has designated or expanded 23 national monuments and protected more than 265 million acres of public lands and waters, more than any other president.Unfortunately, none of those new designations lie east of the Mississippi. Only 22 of the nation’s 121 national monuments are in the East. West Virginia currently has none. However, a group of Mountain State conservation advocates, businesspeople, outdoor recreation enthusiasts, and other citizens has organized to secure a federal designation for the proposed Birthplace of Rivers National Monument.Screen shot 2016-06-28 at 5.33.30 PM“There are no landscape-scale national monuments in the East,” says David Lillard, special projects manager with the West Virginia Rivers Coalition (WVRC). “There’s a need and a worthiness in the East as well.”Where is the birthplace of rivers? The proposed national monument is centered around the existing 47,815-acre Cranberry Wilderness, which lies within the Monongahela National Forest in east-central West Virginia and drains via the Cranberry and Williams Rivers. To encompass the headwaters of the adjacent Cherry, Gauley, Elk, and Greenbrier Rivers, the monument boundaries strategically include 75,000 additional acres, all within the national forest, in two sections along the Monongahela’s northeastern and southern borders.The naturally diverse area already attracts hikers, mountain bikers, paddlers, anglers, hunters, and other outdoor enthusiasts. Protecting the area as a national monument would provide a wide range of benefits for West Virginia. A WVRC poll showed that 84 percent of voters support the proposed monument.2016-05-30-16-45-55_27324597822_o_FIXWhy create a national monument? First, says Lillard, a national monument designation would permanently protect the land from industrial development, a significant step in this fossil fuel-rich state.Second, this measure would help ensure the purity of the rivers, a critical step given that millions of people downstream depend on them every day for fresh, clean drinking water. Just two and a half years ago, a massive chemical spill into the Elk River polluted more than 300,000 people’s tap water for months, which highlighted the vital need for this protected resource.2016-05-30-20-13-10_26814375774_o_FIXClean headwaters also facilitate positive recreation experiences downstream for fishing and paddling. More than 90 percent of West Virginia’s native trout streams fall within the proposed monument’s borders. And creek boaters flock to the headwaters of these rivers.Third, says Lillard, a monument designation would help ensure that any future logging remains at a sustainable level.The monument can significantly boost tourism revenue throughout the area. According to an economic impact study, the monument’s designation would create 143 jobs, increase visitor-related spending in communities surrounding the monument by 42 percent, and generate more than $14.5 million in economic output annually. Similarly, land-management research group Headwaters Economics studied the local economies of communities bordering or adjacent to 17 national monuments in the western U.S. from 1982 to 2011, and they found that jobs grew at four times the rate of similar communities that didn’t have a national monument as a neighbor.How can it be designated?National monuments can be created either by a majority congressional vote or by a signed presidential designation under authority of the Antiquities Act. “We’ll take it either way,” says Lillard.The International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) and the West Virginia Council of Trout Unlimited have also joined in supporting and advocating for the monument. And over the past several months, Lillard has witnessed many local community members living adjacent to the proposed site evolve from skeptics to advocates.“There’s been a groundswell of local support around the area where the monument would be,” he says. “They’re self-organizing and have local leadership on the ground with more plans to boost community engagement. A number of outdoor and tourism businesses have been rising up and saying they really want this for West Virginia. We even have Birthplace of Rivers information centers now. At 14 local shops, they have maps people can take and postcards at the counter.”In mid-May, Lillard and three Pocahontas County, West Virginia, advocates traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet with representatives from President Obama’s administration to discuss the Birthplace of Rivers proposal. Upon arrival, they delivered 1,500 letters of support for the monument to the president.“Around the beginning of this year, the focus of this campaign shifted strongly toward the president,” Lillard explains. “He has indicated there will be more monuments designated. We’ve been meeting with his administration’s monument people for a long time, and they’re very interested.”A presidential precedent of sorts exists for departing commanders-in-chief to establish 11th-hour public lands on their way out the door. For example, during the first seven years of President Clinton’s two terms in office, he designated one national monument. In his last year, he established 19, with seven of those only becoming official in his last week and a half in the White House.2016-05-30-16-59-30_27146952550_o_FIXWhat happens next? Some have expressed concerns that the national monument designation might restrict access, especially since the management plan for the landscape wouldn’t be fully developed until after the president or Congress approves the designation. The West Virginia state chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation has expressed concern over the president’s potential use of the Antiquities Act to establish the monument, which in their view would be a federal back door that bypasses public approval.To ease these concerns, Lillard explains that sustaining current levels of access both now and for future generations is one of main motivations guiding the designation push.“For the most part, things would continue to be what they are now,” says Lillard. “Our proposal calls for some more restorative forestry, spruce in particular, but most everything else would stay the same. One of the biggest developments over the past few months has been that many former opponents are now at the table and see how the monument can be good for West Virginia and how they can have a role.”If designated, the monument would remain under the management of the U.S. Forest Service. U.S. Forest Service Chief Thomas Tidwell explains that typically, as has been the situation on recent Forest Service monuments, “monument designations complement the underlying management plan — which is developed with public input. If hunting and fishing are permitted under the current forest management plan, that would typically continue as a national monument.”Lillard agrees. “National monument status would allow the Forest Service to continue to manage it. We are not trying to create a national park, and we certainly don’t want to create more wilderness there or exclude people using it currently. What’s there now is what we want to keep. There are other types of protection, and we think this is the highest level of protection available.”26816777053_4e0d9b8975_o_FIXTo help increase publicity for the proposed monument, a pair of Birthplace of Rivers advocates—paddlers Matt Kearns and Adam Swisher—journeyed from the Elk River headwaters in Southern Monongahela National Forest to the mouth of the river in Charleston. On the final day of their adventure, more than 100 fellow Birthplace of Rivers advocates joined in for a flotilla escort of the last few miles.Said Swisher afterwards, “As President Obama wraps up his second term, designating this monument would be a significant way to ensure his lasting legacy in the Mountain State.”last_img read more

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One-stop mortgage shopping an opportunity for credit unions

first_imgby: Tandy VincentNationally recognized consumer advocate, Clark Howard, recently posted an article encouraging homebuyers to compare mortgages to ensure they get the best interest rate. Howard says “the difficulty of getting a mortgage has created a situation where people don’t even shop for a mortgage anymore. There’s no thought to even make a second phone call.”Unfortunately, Clark is right! According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau1 nearly half (47%) of Americans don’t shop for a mortgage. Instead, overwhelmed with the process of finding a home, they opt to talk to only one lender! It’s a financial mistake that can cost a homebuyer more than $25,000.2Credit unions can help. But how?As financial advocates, credit unions are uniquely positioned to help members make the right financial choices when it comes to financing a home. It’s kind of our thing.In service of that commitment, and in light of the CFPB findings, establishing first point of contact with home-buying members in the earliest stages of the process is where we should focus our attention. If we can get in front of buyers while they are just starting their home search and before they hire a Realtor, we’re in a prime position to become their real estate advocate and earn their mortgage business as a result. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Onsite: CommunityLIVE from Las Vegas

first_imgThis week over 1,500 people came to Las Vegas for CommunityLive. This is much more than an OnBase users conference. People from many different industries came together to listen to speakers discuss how organizations can work better smarter and faster. Credit unions were well represented at the event.Hyland president and CEO Bill Priemer kicked off the conference talking about the power of community. This theme was constant through the entire event. Bill walked through six benefits of community:Collective wisdomPushing our limitsSupport & beliefNew ideasBorrowed motivationAccountabilityAs Bill dove deeper into his opening remarks it was hard not to see how credit unions are perfectly positioned to leverage our community to excel going forward.The keynote speaker of the event was Guy Kawasaki. Guy is the former chief evangelist of Apple and a well know blogger on the art of innovation. I was really looking forward to hearing Guy speak being a fan of his TED talk.The first of his ten points is to “Make Meaning.” This hit home with the credit union attendees in the audience. We all know we have a strong purpose and meaning the question I would ask is are we doing our best to communicate it. I enjoyed his conversation from moving from a mission statement to a mantra. Something simple all our employees and members can understand.Guy’s third talking point was to “jump to the next curve.” When we think of the technological change happening in every facet of the credit union world this could not have been timelier. And in a room full of tech people, you could smell the wheels spinning.The credit union track at CommunityLIVE was packed with chances to network, user groups and breakout sessions. I sat in on one presentation by DFCU Financial’s Elizabeth Hershey. She discussed DFCU’s multiyear transition to ECM and the gains instantly realized moving into a digital world.It was great talking to credit union friends in attendance and hearing why they come back to CommunityLIVE every year. I heard over and over about how great of a networking event it is for them. They not only do they get new ideas, but it has created a community to leverage and accomplish things for the betterment of their CUs. As at any event you could feel the passion from the credit union people. 54SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Credit union leadership training and mentoring

first_imgLeadership is rarely something that is arbitrarily given. Rather, leadership is earned. If you’re already a credit union leader, you still must earn your position every day. That goes double for aspiring leaders, who must be proactive in their pursuit of performance and responsibility.But continuing education opportunities for credit union leadership is scarce. So, what can you learn, who can you learn from, and where can you find these people?What Leaders Can LearnLeaders and aspiring leaders can learn quite a bit, actually—at least, depending on the venue. There may be some management training seminars out there, but those tend to be generic. Then, there are certifications and webinars from NAFCU and CUNA…But often, these educational opportunities are pre-decided. They may not fit your individual needs for professional growth. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Golf courses deemed non-essential, Cuomo adjusts executive order

first_imgGovernor Cuomo has added golf courses to the list of non-essential businesses. Before golf courses were added to the list, many were still open across the state. This means that all golf courses must close until Wednesday, April 29. (WBNG) — Governor Andrew Cuomo updated the executive order on Thursday morning.center_img For more on the Coronavirus, click here.last_img

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