How can I avoid being IT typecast?

first_imgHow can I avoid being IT typecast?On 28 May 2002 in Personnel Today I have been working in HR for 10 years. I am in a relatively senior role andwould like to move on. I’ve got a solid CV and great qualifications. However, Ireally only have experience in one specific industry sector – IT. I would liketo move into something new, but do not feel very confident about moving into acompletely new sector. On the other hand, I don’t want to be typecast bystaying in IT. How important do you think experience of more than one sector isin building a career in HR? Grant Taylor, consultant, Macmillan Davies Hodes Depth of experience in a particular business sector is important as it helpsyou to climb the career ladder effectively in that sector. It is more difficultto gain promotion in a new business sector. The best way to move to a new sector is in a similar role, as you offerexperience of operating at that level, even though you lack an understanding ofthe business sector. The ‘something new’ you are looking for can often be foundwith a sideways move to a new sector. You will also feel more confidentoperating at a level of seniority you are used to. It is important for your development to gain experience in a range ofbusiness sectors as they all operate differently, and the type of staff youwill work with will vary greatly. This develops your ability to adapt todifferent challenges and draw on experience from different environments, so youwill broaden the knowledge that you have in dealing with HR issues on a grandscale. Peter Sell, joint managing director, DMS consultancy You say that you have great qualifications, but what are they? If you arenot CIPD qualified, this should be something to consider. To my knowledge, HR professionals with experience of a number of differentindustries have more to offer than someone with experience of only one sector.Having said that, your lack of confidence needs to be overcome. Your experiencein IT probably involves you recruiting in areas where there may be a skillsshortage, developing innovative compensation packages and being reactive to aconstantly changing environment. To be successful in an IT human resources rolerequires a strong personality, business awareness and the ability to thinkbeyond traditional boundaries. If you can sell your strengths, a move out ofthe IT sector should not be a problem. Doug Knott, senior consultant, Chiumento There is a strong body of opinion, with which I concur, that HR managementskills are transferable across sectors. In fact, the challenge of working in adifferent environment can help to keep your interest levels high and your witssharp. Unfortunately, this view is not shared by many of those making the decisionsin the recruitment market. The more senior your position and the older you are,the more difficult you will find it to change sectors. I would stronglyrecommend that you gain experience outside of the IT sector so that you do notbecome typecast and you can demonstrate your ability to operate in differentindustry sectors. In order to assist with your job search outside IT, you should considerusing a skills/competency-based CV which markets your generic HR managementskills and places less emphasis on your chronological career history. There is strong evidence to support the theory that flexible HR professionals,committed to ongoing personal development, can successfully move betweensectors. As long as you match this description, you should be confident aboutmaking the transition. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Tropospheric clouds in Antarctica

first_imgCompared to other regions, little is known about cloudsin Antarctica. This arises in part from the challengingdeployment of instrumentation in this remote and harshenvironment and from the limitations of traditional satellite passive remote sensing over the polar regions. Yet clouds have a critical influence on the ice sheet’s radiation budget and its surface mass balance. The extremely low temperatures, absolute humidity levels, and aerosol concentrations found in Antarctica create unique conditions for cloud formation that greatly differ from those encountered in other regions, including the Arctic. During the first decade of the 21st century, new results from field studies, the advent of cloud observations from spaceborne active sensors, and improvements in cloud parameterizations in numerical modelshave contributed to significant advances in our understanding of Antarctic clouds. This review covers fourmain topics: (1) observational methods and instruments,(2) the seasonal and interannual variability of cloudamounts, (3) the microphysical properties of clouds andaerosols, and (4) cloud representation in global and regional numerical models. Aside from a synthesis of the existing literature, novel insights are also presented. A new climatology of clouds over Antarctica and the Southern Ocean is derived from combined measurements of the CloudSat and Cloud‐Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder SatelliteObservation (CALIPSO) satellites. This climatology is usedto assess the forecast cloud amounts in 20th century globalclimate model simulations. While cloud monitoring overAntarctica from space has proved essential to the recentadvances, the review concludes by emphasizing the needfor additional in situ measurements.last_img read more

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Dolls’ house listed by agent on Rightmove receives serious enquiries

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Dolls’ house listed by agent on Rightmove receives serious enquiries previous nextAgencies & PeopleDolls’ house listed by agent on Rightmove receives serious enquiriesProperty listed on the portal to help raise funds for local charity attracts real house hunters keen on its Georgian looks, agents says.Nigel Lewis7th August 201701,380 Views If you think the pictures of this property for sale on Rightmove from Cotswolds and Warwickshire estate agent Peter Clarke & Co are a little odd, then you’d be right.Because the three-bedroom property in Shipston-upon-Stour is really a dolls’ house uploaded to Rightmove in a bid to raise cash for a local charity.This didn’t stop one keen buyer asking to arrange a viewing at the property, branch manager Sally Coombs (pictured, below) told the BBC.It’s not surprising that the enquirer became confused. The property’s listing on Rightmove has been written to sound like a real one, albeit in a tongue-in-cheek way.Sally’s listing for property goes into a lot of detail, describing it as a classic Georgian house and that the roof and front elevations swing open to “reveal beautiful accommodation set on three floors, and it is part furnished”.She also thinks it would make a fantastic Christmas present and would “be bound to give years of joy for your children or grandchildren”.Peter Clarke & Co told the local paper that the idea came about when a local charity it is involved with called Shipston Home Nursing asked if a dolls house they wanted to sell to raise funds could be displayed within their branch, at which point staff at the branch listed it on Rightmove as well.The charity is hoping to raise £500 from the sale of the property, which will be available for viewings at the agent’s branch until the end of September.Unlike many spoof ads uploaded to Rightmove over the years, this one has not been deleted by the portal. It remains live within the agent’s 57 properties listed for the Shipston-upon-Stour area. Unsurprisingly, it is the cheapest.Bugingham PalaceIt’s not the first time an agent has taken to Rightmove with humour in mind. The most recent example until now had been Hertford agent Steven Oates.Last December one of its employees built a ‘bug house’ called ‘Bugingham Palace’ designed to help encourage creepy crawlies in their garden but then put it up on Rightmove with a £1 million price tag.The property didn’t achieve a sale. But the agent says the listing attracted 4,500 views compared to the usual 450 it receives for property for sale. Peter Clarke & Co’ Rightmove Sally Coombs August 7, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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Annuals – Be He Me

first_imgAh me, but it’s refreshing to listen to a band with such a varied and distinctive sound. What make this six-piece from Raleigh, North Carolina interesting is that their album consists of such an eclectic mix even within individual songs. Probably the best song on ‘Be He Me’ is the opener, Brother which begins as an ethereal folk ballad, before morphing into a stomping, post-rock Arcade Fire-esque finale, bringing itself to a rather abrupt end.The album continues, first into sunny pop and then the electronics and experimentalism of Carry Around, an aural union of Air and Gorillaz. Bull and the Goat is The Kinks given a frantic modern edge, while the four tracks that close the US version are all modelled on the acoustic side of ‘The Bends’ era Radiohead. The UK version is given an extra 3 songs. Ease My Mind begins as a dreary acoustic number, until country fiddles appear, whilst River Run juxtaposes an upbeat verse, that sounds like it’s being played on the piano in the saloon of a Western film, with a chorus of mournful crooning over melancholic trumpets. The closer Misty Coy recalls the early electronic experimentation of Pink Floyd. The bonus songs are intriguing, but at 15 tracks and over an hour long, ‘Be He Me’ could do with some trimming.Annuals have interesting ideas, but their first effort lacks any notable melodies. Strong vocal lines are sometimes sorely lacking, sometimes brilliantly compensated for. Most of all this album shows ambition and promise; in a couple of years, they could be legendary.Jacob Lloydlast_img read more

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Heretical text of Jesus’ brother found in Oxford

first_imgThe first original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing, which describes Jesus’ secret teachings to his brother James, has been discovered in Oxford.The discovery, made by Geoffrey Smith and Brent Landau of the University of Texas at Austin, is particularly significant because it was previously thought that only Coptic translations of the apocryphal Gospel still existed.“To say that we were excited once we realized what we’d found is an understatement,” Dr Smith, an assistant professor of religious studies at UTA, said in a statement. “We never suspected that Greek fragments of the First Apocalypse of James survived from antiquity. But there they were, right in front of us.”The ancient manuscript, written in the fifth or sixth century, describes secret revelations made by Jesus to his brother James about the heavenly realm and future events. These include Jesus telling James that they are both predestined to die violently, though he stresses that death is nothing to be feared.“The text supplements the biblical account of Jesus’ life and ministry by allowing us access to conversations that purportedly took place between Jesus and his brother, James — secret teachings that allowed James to be a good teacher after Jesus’ death,” Smith said. Such apocryphal writings fell outside the canonical boundaries set by Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria, in his “Easter letter of 367” that defined the 27-book New Testament. This led to the destruction of many ancient apocryphal texts, including copies of the First Apocalypse of James. “This new discovery is significant in part because it demonstrates that Christians were still reading and studying extra-canonical writings long after Christian leaders deemed them heretical,” Smith said.Smith and Landau discovered the fragments among the unpublished Oxyrhynchus papyri housed in the Sackler Library at Oxford University, which is owned and overseen by the Egypt Exploration Society. The collection comprises thousands of papyrus texts from ancient Oxyrhynchus and other sites in Egypt and is the largest collection of papyri in the world.The First Apocalypse of James fragments were unearthed in 1904/5 from the city of Oxyrhynchus in Egypt. The team who excavated this site from 1896-1907, Bernard Grenfell and Arthur Hunt, unearthed upwards of 200,000 papyrus fragments and sent them back to Oxford to await publication. To date, only about 5300 have been published.Edward Scrivens, Ashmoleon Junior Teaching Fellow, told Cherwell: “This discovery reminds us of the importance of the collections we have here in Oxford. Our libraries and museums contain so much material that we don’t even necessarily know everything that’s in them.“It’s moments like this that remind those of us who study the past that it can be just as important to ‘excavate’ in the archive as the trench, and to responsibly use and care for what we find there.”last_img read more

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Speech: UKEF services help hundreds of businesses every year

first_imgUnder this government, UK Export Finance (UKEF), the UK’s export credit agency, has been transformed into a responsive, competitive and effective supporter of UK exports. The government’s Export Strategy, published over the summer, puts UKEF at the heart of our offer to help British businesses succeed overseas.And already there is growing recognition of UKEF and its world-class support for exporters; the CBI said in its Winning Worldwide report that “UKEF services have provided a vital complement to the private finance sector to help hundreds of SMEs” on their exporting journey.Only last week, the British Exporters’ Association awarded UKEF the highest rating of any European export credit agency for the fifth year in a row, recognising UKEF’s commitment to strengthening its product range and developing new ways to reach out to exporters and their suppliers across the UK.As Minister of State for Trade and Export Promotion, I am very proud of the work of UKEF. In 2017/18, UKEF provided £2.5 billion worth of support to help nearly 200 companies sell to 75 markets around the world. In turn, this is supporting thousands of skilled jobs and contributing billions to the UK economy, as well as improving infrastructure and growing industry abroad.Projects like Offshore Cape Three Points, a transformational natural gas field in Ghana, which, with UKEF support worth US$400 million, is helping the Government of Ghana reduce its dependence on oil and meet its COP 21 commitments for climate mitigation.Or UKEF’s US$35 million loan to support Biwater’s contract to deliver much-needed water treatment in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Or JDR Cables’ contract to supply subsea power cables to Danish company Dong Energy’s offshore windfarms, providing non-carbon energy to the UK.UKEF’s mission is to ensure that no viable UK export fails for lack of finance or insurance from the private sector. Its role is to provide support where the private sector can’t, and so it is therefore demand-led.I was therefore pleased to see earlier this week that the Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade is also taking note of its work. However, he expresses concerns about government support for companies exporting in the fossil fuels sector.Supporting the UK’s renewables sector is of the utmost priority for the whole of the UK government; we have world-leading suppliers in this sector, and want to do all we can to help them achieve international success. DIT has provided trade promotion support for renewables sector exports worth hundreds of millions, for example through tradeshows and sourcing procurement opportunities.We welcome the opportunity to provide UKEF support to renewables sector exports – and in the last 2 years, have supported £310 million worth of contracts. However, there is significant liquidity in the private sector finance market for investment in renewables projects. Our aim is only to provide support where there is a lack of private sector finance, and the sector’s export success – £500 million last year – shows that other sources are available.On the other hand, the UK’s oil and gas sector has suffered in recent years due to the long-term depression in oil prices and huge scale of financing needed to develop these projects. According to Oil and Gas UK, the sector supports more than 302,000 jobs – a decline of 160,000 since 2014. It is also vital to the UK’s energy security. This sector needs support.UKEF has also made clear its commitment to high standards of environmental, social and human rights risk management – rigorously following the OECD Common Approaches, which sets the framework for export credit agencies in ensuring these risks are mitigated.In fact, UKEF is a member of the Equator Principles Steering Group, seeking multilateral progress on the environment and human rights for lending and large projects while maintaining a level playing field for UK businesses to compete internationally.UKEF’s role is to back UK businesses, of all sizes and in all sectors, stepping in where required and ensuring that the right support is in place to help them compete in a global marketplace and realise the benefits of international success. From this government’s perspective, UKEF is doing this better than ever.last_img read more

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Judith Palfrey to lead Let’s Move! initiative

first_imgFirst lady Michelle Obama announced Sept. 2 that pediatrician Judith S. Palfrey, the T. Berry Brazelton Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, will lead her Let’s Move! childhood obesity initiative as executive director. For decades, Palfrey has provided clinical care to thousands of children and families, conducted groundbreaking pediatric research, taught future physicians, and led major medical organizations. Palfrey has been a longtime supporter of the Let’s Move! campaign and spoke at its launch in February 2010 when she was president of the American Academy of Pediatrics.“This is a terrific opportunity for Judy, one of this nation’s foremost pediatricians, to change the lives of thousands of children across America,” said Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds. “I’m very pleased for her, and think the White House has made an excellent choice.”For more information.last_img read more

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Matthew Seadon-Young & More Set for West End’s Beautiful

first_img View Comments Matthew Seadon-Young (Billy Elliot) and Barbara Drennan (A View from the Bridge) will feel the earth move under their feet when they join the West End cast of Beautiful: The Carole King Musical on November 28. They are set to take on the roles of Gerry Goffin and Genie Klein, respectively. Additionally, Joseph Prouse (Jesus Christ Superstar) recently joined the company as Donnie Kirshner.Beautiful is the untold story of her journey from school girl to superstar; from her relationship with husband and song-writing partner Gerry Goffin, their close friendship and playful rivalry with fellow song-writing duo Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, to her remarkable rise to stardom. Along the way, she became one of the most successful solo acts in music history, and wrote the soundtrack to a generation.Cassidy Janson continues in the title role, along with Olivier winner Lorna Want as Cynthia Weil and Ian McIntosh as Barry Mann.The London production is playing at the Aldwych Theatre; Beautiful continues to run on Broadway at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre. Matthew Seadon-Younglast_img read more

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Risky Diet.

first_img They’ve looked for ways to control pathogens, such as Salmonella and E. coli 0157:H7, that cause food-borne illness. They’ve tried all kinds of sanitizers — chlorine, chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, diluted ethanol and commercial products — to ensure raw-sprout safety. “We haven’t been successful in killing the organisms to the degree we’d like,” Beuchat said. “All of the sanitizers have some effect on the pathogens, but none eliminates them.” The problem with anything short of complete success in eliminating pathogens from seeds is the potential for a bacterial explosion as the sprouts grow. “If you miss only one or two pathogenic bacteria on the seeds, they can multiply to very high numbers,” Beuchat said. “You can have pathogen numbers of 1 million to 10 million per gram of sprouts during the three to four days of production.” Beuchat has mainly studied alfalfa sprouts, the kind most commonly used in salads and sandwiches. Mung bean and soybean sprouts are mostly used for cooked dishes. The many other kinds of sprouts include broccoli, clover, onion, radish and sunflower. To grow sprouts, seeds are kept constantly wet and at room temperature (65 to 75 degrees) for three to four days. Those same conditions are ideal for bacterial growth. Beuchat said the seeds can become contaminated with a pathogen anywhere in a long trail. “We can’t completely control the environment in the field,” he said. “Birds can carry Salmonella. Animals, including deer, can carry E. coli. Manure that Request the high-res image Larry Beuchat rarely eats raw sprouts. And nothing he has seen in his lab encourages him to eat more. “There’s certainly a risk,” said Beuchat, a food microbiologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Raw sprouts are popular in salads, sandwiches and other foods. They’re also cooked as an ingredient in a number of foods, particularly stir-fried and sauteed dishes. The cooked sprouts don’t worry Beuchat. But eating them raw, he says, poses a risk of food-borne illness. His research at the UGA Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement in Griffin, Ga., is at the heart of his concerns. “We’ve done quite a lot of work with both the alfalfa seeds and mature sprouts,” he said. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has concerns about raw sprouts as a source of food-borne illness. Several outbreaks of Salmonella and E. coli have been connected to raw sprouts. Beuchat and his graduate students have scrutinized sprouts throughout conditions normally used to grow and market them. E.coli O157:H7 hasn’t been properly composted can be contaminated.” Harmful organisms can get onto the seeds after they leave the field, too. “Anywhere along the way — in the handling, transportation, contact with human hands — the seeds can become contaminated,” he said. The real problem starts then. “A pathogen on a dry seed is just there. It’s not growing,” Beuchat said. “But once you hydrate it and put it in the sprout production process, the organism is going to reproduce during that entire time. It has all it needs — plenty of moisture, adequate temperature and nutrients from the sprouts.” Once the sprouts are mature, they’re washed, packaged and distributed to stores and restaurants. They’re often refrigerated during that time, which limits further bacterial growth. But if pathogens were there to start with, the sprouts will already be unsafe. “Without heat, we have no effective intervention step to kill the pathogens,” Beuchat said. “Sprouts are nutritious,” said Judy Harrison, an Extension Service foods specialist with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “But given the safety concerns, eating them raw is something to be very cautious of.” Children, older people and those with compromised immune systems are especially at risk for food-borne illnesses with serious and even life-threatening complications. “Those people should probably avoid eating raw sprouts,” Harrison said.last_img read more

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Hurricane Preparedness

first_imgHurricane Irma strengthened to a Category 5 storm with sustained winds of 175 mph as of Monday, Sept. 5. It’s moving west-northwest on its present track, but longer-term models project that it will make a sharp turn to the north later this week, which could threaten parts of the Southeast, including Georgia.South Georgia residents could see impacts from Irma as early as Saturday, but residents will most likely see impacts Sunday morning.Irma is presently projected to go north of Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and Cuba and south of the Florida peninsula over the next several days. It is expected to take a sharp turn to the north by Sunday morning. If Irma turns sooner, then Florida’s east coast of Florida will be in the path of the storm; if it turns later, then Tampa, Florida, and the Florida’s west coast could be in the storm’s direct path. There’s also a chance it could move directly up the Florida peninsula. Forecasters will have a much better sense of Irma’s path by Friday morning.Irma’s major impacts in Georgia are likely to be strong winds, locally heavy rains and, along the coast, a potential storm surge and high waves. Tornadoes are also possible. Irma is very powerful, and its strong winds and rain could affect areas far from the storm’s center.Recall that when Superstorm Sandy hit New Jersey in 2012, Georgians were injured by falling limbs due to gusty winds resulting from Sandy. Trees may fall, especially given Georgia’s wet soils and previous drought stress on trees. Fallen trees could down power lines and eliminate electrical power to Georgia houses and businesses as a result of the storm. Irma is moving quickly, so it seems that Georgia should not see the amount of rain that Texas received from Hurricane Harvey.Follow official information from local emergency management agencies regarding evacuations or other steps to take. Official forecasts from the National Hurricane Center can be found at www.hurricanes.gov.Residents in south Georgia with outdoor activities planned for the weekend or early next week should watch the weather carefully. It’s too early now to cancel events, but be prepared to act later in the week should the forecast indicate Irma that is headed toward Georgia.Coastal residents or those in low-lying areas should consider preparing a hurricane kit; storing fresh water, batteries and other necessities to cover several days without power; and preparing an evacuation plan. Since power may be out, keep enough gas and cash on hand to cover several days.Local areas could see some freshwater flooding. Agricultural producers should consider moving machinery and livestock to higher terrain. Depending on the exact path and strength of Irma, some coastal areas may need to be evacuated due to the potential storm surge. It is too early now to evacuate, however, as the storm’s path may shift. For updates, visit the “Climate and Agriculture in the South East” blog at blog.extension.uga.edu/climate, like SEAgClimate on Facebook or follow @SE_AgClimate on Twitter. For answers to general questions, call Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist, at 706-310-3467.(Please note that Pam Knox is an agricultural climatologist for UGA Extension, not an official forecaster.)last_img read more

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