In brief

first_img Comments are closed. This month’ news in brief Learning reps clash? Government proposals on union learning representatives are not detailedenough and will cause confusion, according to the Employers Forum on Statuteand Practice. The proposals on workplace learning initiatives, which are due tobe brought in this year under the Employment Act, could lead to clashes withemployers’ training departments, warned chief executive of the ESP RobbieGilbert in an interview with Personnel Today magazine. Motor trainers expandThe training arm of the Retail Motor Industry Federation, ReMIT, isexpanding its offering. Chairman Mike Allmond has announced the opening ofReMIT’s first wholly-owned training centre in Croydon, the creation of a newposition of quality director and a distance-learning package.  www.rmif.co.ukSchemes endorsedEmployers and Local Education Authorities (LEAs) have been praised forworking together to identify and meet the learning needs of their communities.The Adult Learning Inspectorate noted that community schemes encourage newlearners, who, in turn, find their sense of wellbeing improved.   www.ali.gov.uk/inspection/reportsLearning at work dayTraining should once again get the national thumbs up as preparations forthis year’s Learning at Work Day are underway. The 15 May has been earmarkedfor this year’s event and organiser Campaign for Learning is hoping to build onthe 4,000 organisations and 750,000 people who were involved last year.  www.campaign-for-learning.org.ukCan’t get a plumberSkilled labour in the construction trade is in even shorter supply thanever, according to evidence from chartered surveyors body the RICS. More thanhalf of those questioned for the RICS Construction Market Survey reported asharp rise in construction skills shortages in the fourth quarter. www.ricsfirms.comScheme wins award Pera Integrated Training has won a National Training Award for a programmedelivered for flat glass manufacturer, Solaglas. The programme was based aroundPera’s output-driven approach, which identifies what people need to learn andwhich areas of training best suit that need.  www.pera.com Previous Article Next Article In briefOn 1 Feb 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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E-learning is about people, not just saving company money

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. E-learning is about people, not just saving company moneyOn 13 May 2003 in Personnel Today E-learning will only prove beneficial to those companiesthat put people ahead of cost savings. Remember, what works in a traditionalclassroom is not necessarily going to work on a desktop in an isolated officeE-learning is thriving in the public sector, with the Government puttingtechnology at the heart of education. In January, education secretary Charles Clarke announced that schools wouldbe given an extra £280m for e-learning credits to be spent on approved digitalresources listed on the Government’s new online resources catalogue, calledCurriculum Online. The cash that is emerging from government coffers into e-learning isn’t justrestricted to local education authority and college budgets. Since December2002, more than 250,000 UK police officers have been accessing the force’sintranet, either with a CD-Rom or over the internet, learning about improvingdiversity and community race relations. Nevertheless, despite the advent of ‘anytime, anywhere’ training and itsvirtues – gains in savings, efficiency and productivity, for example –e-learning in the private sector just hasn’t had the same success as it hasexperienced in the public sector. According to The realities of corporate LMS 2003, new research frome-learning market analyst and consultancy eLearnity, many corporates viewe-learning with suspicion. The most significant barriers to its roll-out, theysay, are cultural acceptance, level of usage, data quality and lack of internalresources. In my opinion, the root of this suspicion can be linked to two commonmisconceptions: people tend to disregard the needs of the user, the mostimportant component of e-learning; and they see e-learning as a mere exercisein cost saving. These are misguided and they are intrinsically connected. How is it that the all-important user gets left out of the e-learningequation? The problem is that traditional learning is too often replaced withonline training with little diligence. I’ve seen organisations implementinge-learning material as if it were classroom-based: they set up a group ofemployees in a lab with PCs and tell them to train there for four hours a week.They are expected to just get on with it. There’s no live instructor, nointeraction among trainees – just a bunch of people in a room, using computers.This approach fails to acknowledge that some employees find it hard to learnin isolation. It also fails to help the practical learner overcome difficultiessuch as IT illiteracy and unfamiliar terminology. Taking this approach toe-learning will not only isolate the user, but will also give them theimpression that it is merely about downloading sophisticated programs. It is important to understand that when it comes to e-learning, that whatworks in a classroom is not necessarily going to work on a desktop. HR managersshould understand that some online courses might be inferior to traditionalclassroom training. Teaching interpersonal skills or first aid are goodexamples. It is crucial not to view e-learning as a mere exercise in cost saving. Thisundermines one of its biggest benefits – adding value to the business. It istrue that companies will save money by avoiding travel costs, lost work timeand scheduling conflicts. But at the same time, it is important to remember e-learning’sother real benefits. It offers effective learning for individuals at aconvenient time and at the same time supports business objectives. E-learning needs to be about aligning personal and corporate performancealong with driving up standards. It is also a powerful way of investing inemployees and ensuring they have the right knowledge to perform optimally. Above all, e-learning is an excellent means of supporting the organisation’soverall performance. To do this, HR managers need to identify theorganisation’s needs and understand the benefits they want to gain from thetechnology. Having a plan in place to invest in employees and matching it toyour organisation’s business needs is the key. Ultimately, getting the most out of e-learning requires the content to befocused on supporting business goals as well as individual development needs.Explore the potential benefits of e-learning rather than putting the emphasison cost savings. As aptly conveyed by Charles Clark, e-learning is “notjust about the kit, but about what you use it for and how you use it”. www.sap.com/educationBy Lisa Clark, Education services director, SAPUK Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Warm Weekend on Tap for Ocean City

first_imgSun, light wind and temperatures in the 60s made for a beautiful day Friday in Ocean City.Ocean City will enjoy some October weather in December this weekend as the forecast calls for sunny weather with highs in the low to mid-60s.While the mainland flirts with record warmth, Ocean City will see slightly cooler temperatures due to its proximity to a 51-degree ocean. But the wind will be light and out of the southwest.Saturday’s forecast calls for patchy fog before 10 a.m., then a mostly sunny day with a high near 65 degrees.Sunday will be sunny with a high near 64 degrees.The surf forecast calls for 1 to 2 foot waves both days.The weather should be ideal for weekend events that include:Dec. 11-13 — Swingin’ to the Holidays: 2015 Spectacular at the Music Pier, Moorlyn Terrace and Boardwalk. Presented by the Greater Ocean City Theater Co. An enchanting cast of professional singers and dancers will present a high energy, family-oriented, song and dance tribute to the holidays directed and choreographed by Michael Hartman. Through dazzling costumes, familiar songs and special effects, the show will kindle the holiday spirit as the magic of the season comes to life in a brand new musical journey through seasonal favorites. Tickets $18 general admission, $15 children 12 and under. Show times Dec. 11&12-7:30 p.m., Dec.13-2 p.m. Call (609) 399-6111 or visit www.ocnj.us/boxoffice.Dec. 12 — Live Nativity: 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. at the Ocean City TabernacleDec. 12 — Happy Birthday Jesus: Children’s program with St. Peter’s United Methodist Church, 10:30 a.m. at the Ocean City TabernacleDec. 12 — “Magi”: Word of Life Gospel Production, 7 p.m. at the Ocean City TabernacleDec. 12 —  Santa & his Toy Shoppe and Friends: Live, fun-filled family show, 2 p.m. at the Flanders Hotel, 11th and Boardwalk. Come join Santa and his elves, newest reindeer, enjoy a puppet show, balloon animals and refreshments. For tickets call(609) 399-1000.Dec. 12-13 — Breakfast With Santa: 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Sat. 12/12, Sunrise Café, 1200 Asbury Ave., Sun., 12/13 Jon & Patty’s Coffee Bar & Bistro, 637 Asbury.Dec. 12-13 — Free Horse & Carriage Rides: Noon to 3 p.m. in front of City Hall, 9th and Asbury Ave. For more information call 1-800-BEACH-NJ.Dec. 12-13 — Photos With Santa: Noon to 3 p.m. in front of the Music Pier. There will be a $10 charge per photo. For more information, call 1-800-BEACH-NJ. Dec. 13 — Angelus Chorus: The 65-voice Angelus Chorus will be featured in a program of traditional Christmas music and scriptures at the Ocean City Tabernacle, 5th and Wesley Ave. at 3 p.m. The chorus will be directed by Richard Stanislaw and feature tenor, John Taylor and the Tapestry String Quartet. Admission is free, offering received.last_img read more

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3 takes on dealing with uncertainty

first_img Harvard experts discuss ways to ease the rising sense of isolation and feel more connected Related Social distance makes the heart grow lonelier Feeling more anxious and stressed? You’re not alone In this time of profound uncertainty, society can be sure of one thing: more uncertainty. The seemingly opaque path forward for us, individually and collectively, was the Gazette’s topic with three Harvard professors who shared insights into how uncertainty is viewed in their fields, and the surprising ways in which it’s not necessarily a bad thing.In the beginning was the word“The word ‘uncertainty’ derives from the [Latin] verb cernere, which means ‘to distinguish, to mark out, to separate one thing from the rest, to discern,’’’ said John Hamilton, William R. Kenan Professor of German and Comparative Literature. “When faced with a vast onslaught of data or with an overwhelming flood of disparate information, cernere denotes the capacity to make distinctions, to discover identities and understand the links between them. It is the first step toward knowledge, to single out one phenomenon from the field of manifold experience.“Uncertainty is an ability to draw the lines that define one thing in distinction from something else, [and] combats the urge to be so certain about things and people that you feel you never need to think about them further.”For a literary example, Hamilton pointed to Franz Kafka’s short story “The Burrow” (“Der Bau”). A mole-like creature constructs a shelter for himself and spends his life trying to build a home that will protect him from all kinds of unforeseeable dangers. The shelter is very secure except for the hole that serves as an entranceway. The creature could cover it, but that would mean sealing off his only exit. Referring to this hole, he says, “There I am mortal.” The hole threatens his life, but it also keeps him vigilant and ready.“If the burrow were perfectly secure, he would waste away in idleness and complacency, and therefore put himself at an even greater risk. It is the possibility of being killed and the uncertainty of the threat that keep him alert. His mortality, so to speak, saves his life,” said Hamilton.“Our vulnerability and our uncertainty are painful but can also have a beneficial effect insofar as we remain open and ready for what is ultimately unknowable and uncertain, namely, the future. Keeping things open, rather than making all-too-quick judgments and discernments, helps to remind us that certainty is useful as long as it remains provisional and open to reform or even complete reversal.”Taking measure of what we don’t knowFor many people, measuring uncertainty seems impossible. For astronomer Alyssa A. Goodman, the variable is integral to the study of the universe.“In astronomy … estimating uncertainty is just about as important as making the measurement itself. We’re talking calculations where a part in a million makes a completely gigantic difference in the story of the universe, so we have to be very careful about the answers,” said the Robert Wheeler Willson Professor of Applied Astronomy, co-director for science at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and research associate at the Smithsonian Institution.Being comfortable with uncertainty is essential to astronomers who often can’t conduct experiments in controlled environments like other scientists, Goodman said. She even thinks astronomers can teach the rest of us how to understand and accept uncertainty as a necessary and useful part of life.“Astronomers have to deal with uncertainty every day in our work. [We] can’t move a star or get a different angle … we have to be very serious about clever ways to estimate uncertainty in the absence of more information,” she said. “In the case of COVID-19, right now what we suffer from is a tremendous lack of reliable data, and to make predictions in the absence of reliable data is extraordinarily difficult. [But] it’s not impossible, and I think it’s important that people appreciate that.”Hard-wired to dislike ambiguityAccording to Pershing Square Professor of Human Neuroscience in the Department of Psychology Elizabeth A. Phelps, resolving uncertainty is a major challenge of the brain, whether it is determining what we are seeing or hearing from visual or auditory signals, or deciding the accuracy of a memory. When making decisions, said Phelps, economists have examined how different types of uncertainty influence our choices. They’ve found that although people tend to dislike risk, such as a 50/50 coin toss, we are particularly averse to ambiguity, when the risk is unknown. In ambiguous risky decisions, uncertainty can be seen in the region of the temporal lobe that helps process emotions.“When you see a lot of ambiguity in [a] situation, you see more activity in the amygdala, [which] is thought to be the brain’s threat detector,” Phelps said. “This is a region that we know is important in telling you that there’s something in the environment you should pay attention to because it could potentially be threatening.“Ambiguity is one type of uncertainty [that] is more aversive to people than just knowing that there are some risks [in a situation]. When there’s a lot of ambiguity, meaning we don’t actually know what the probabilities are, [we’ll] make decisions that will pull us away from ambiguity. So we might be more likely to do nothing than have to deal with the ambiguity that’s out there in the world,” she said.Phelps has found through research that uncertainty can, therefore, change our learning about the world, our ability to deal with negative emotions, our decisions, and even our memories. People vary in how easily they can tolerate uncertainty, and those who are more intolerant are generally more likely to be depressed or anxious.With the pandemic, people also vary in their reactions to not knowing when they can return to workplaces, or see elderly family, and in how much uncertainty they can deal with emotionally.“We’re going to see — and we already know that there have been — a lot of mental health consequences,” Phelps said. We solved the problem! Now let’s unsolve it. Love in the time of COVID Tips on how to navigate the rough straits while spending much more time than usual at home with partners Chan School’s Koenen discusses rising mental health concerns in the coronavirus era New research by Daniel Gilbert speaks to our conflicted relationship with progress The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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‘Nowhere to run’: Survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide reflect on its legacy

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first installment in a two-part series discussing two South Bend families’ experiences with the 1994 Rwandan genocide, in light of Notre Dame’s commemoration of the 20th anniversary of this tragedy to take place April 26.Jean Claude Mugenzi cannot lie face down in his bed without thinking of his father and siblings’ murders and his own bullet wound.Mugenzi and his wife Anne Marie Bamukunde, now South Bend residents, survived the 1994 Rwandan genocide against the Tutsis, in which one million people were killed in 100 days. Steph Wulz | The Observer Mugenzi, who was 24 at the time of the genocide, said he fled with his parents and four siblings for 80 days from the killers.“There was nowhere to run because the neighbors knew where we were,” he said. “They were home. So we fled. We saw some of them coming, and we managed to flee through banana trees, and we spent several nights in a swamp near where we come from. “We could hear them looting our property. We could hear them. We could hear the cows screaming because they were being taken away. Even though they are animals, they can feel. They know there are intruders in the home.“We could hear them removing iron sheets from our house, so there was a lot of noise and commotion. You feel uprooted right then and there. You’re sitting, hiding in the middle of a swamp, wondering if you’re going to make it on the other side, how you can hide maybe at a friend’s house before the killers discover you. And you hear all of that. You just realize, ‘This is the end.’”Mugenzi and his family sought refuge with Hutu friends throughout the country but could not stay long in one location, he said.“We would be discovered sometimes and get tortured and get stripped,” he said. “We had to walk almost naked and bare-footed. … Thanks to an old Hutu friend, we would escape sometimes when [the killers] stopped us at the roadblock when they were about to kill us. “I remember one time there was a Hutu who used to farm our fields who told the others, ‘I will take care of them,’ meaning, ‘I will kill them.’ He took us to a different place where we spent several days, and of course, after that time, we had to be on the move again.”Mugenzi said he and his family were “caught by surprise” one night when they had tried to reach a camp operated by Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) rebels.“There was a group of people with knives and guns,” he said. “They ordered us to lay face down, and they started killing. Before they got to me and some others, the rebels arrived and shot from a distance. “When they heard the shots, the leaders said, ‘Shoot them all.’ So they started shooting, so I got shot, and my father and the others didn’t make it. Only my mom managed to slip away through the bushes and my two little sisters. “So I was left for dead in the cold blood, and I could see left to right, one was dead. I could see my younger brother agonizing, and there was nothing I could do to help him. So then there was fighting for what seemed to be an eternity for me, but after that, the RPF rebels took me with their injured to a make-shift hospital, where they treated me for the next maybe two weeks before I was reunited with my mom and my two sisters because they went a different way. They didn’t know that I survived.”Bamukunde said she also lost most of her close relatives in the genocide.“Sometimes I don’t trust people because of what happened,” she said. “I was 16 at the time of the genocide, so I lost my dad. I lost my brother and many aunts and uncles and many friends of our family. “So it was like after genocide, we were just alone, and we were just trying to organize ourselves. It was a new life to many people.”Mugenzi said one way survivors have tried to honor the memories of their loved ones is through ceremonial burial.“When they were killed, they were just thrown wherever,” he said. “Some were lucky to bury them a few days later, but in make-shift tombs. Others were lost completely. We don’t know where [my wife’s] dad was. We never found him and her brother. And it’s the case for many survivors. “So when you’re lucky to know where your loved ones were left, to bring some closure, you bury them with respect and dignity at a memorial site, a genocide memorial site. We did that for my older brother who was killed in Kigali.”To help other survivors process their experiences during the genocide, Bamukunde said she became a psychiatric nurse in Rwanda.“The concept of mental health was new,” she said. “Psychiatric nursing was new in our country before genocide. So they told us about mental health and they told us it’s about counseling. “It’s about taking care of people who have been through psychological programs, trauma, genocide. … I had some friends who went to [nursing] school together who were all genocide survivors, and we were all interested in doing that because we were thinking we could also reach out and help our family, friends and many other survivors.”Bamukunde said she treated many patients for trauma as a result of the genocide, even people who were in their mothers’ wombs during that time. Therapy has helped these and many other survivors to understand their feelings, she said.“We were trying to really listen to them and trying to go through all those stories because sometimes I felt like the story was too much for them, too hard,” she said. “So talking also helps them or using cognitive therapy, talking about the thoughts that they have that doesn’t help them, trying to change them [or] trying body relaxation.”To educate others on genocide, Mugenzi makes documentary films, he said. Mugenzi said he and Bamukunde moved to the United States five years ago so he could attend film school at Columbia College Chicago, from which he will graduate in May. “[My wife] always says, ‘Why didn’t you go to law school or something else in the country?’” he said. “I said, ‘I don’t understand. That is something I don’t want. I will find what I want, whatever it is, and I’ll go for it.’ So I came here to pursue that dream of mine, and thank God I’ve almost reached it, almost.” Mugenzi said he and Bamukunde moved to South Bend a year ago because of their love of Notre Dame and the strong Rwandan community here.“The first time I came to the U.S., I think we came to the Basilica [of the Sacred Heart],” he said. “I’m Roman Catholic, so with friends we came to pray here. We would come almost every Sunday. I love this Basilica. I love this place. … Maybe my kids will come here to study, or maybe I will get a job here.”As both Notre Dame and the world remember the 20th anniversary of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, which took place from April 7 to mid-July, Mugenzi said the genocide is “always present” to survivors, no matter the year.“I should tell you that it took me probably 10 years before I could look at the moonlight and enjoy it, because whenever the moon was out we couldn’t come [out] from hiding and cross a road or something to go into another hiding,” he said. “So I hate it for that. … And it’s a little thing, to not be able to enjoy nature because of what I endured during the genocide, or not being able to lie down lazily in my bed [face down] because that’s how my people got killed. That’s how I got shot, in this position.  “Our life is disturbed by many little things. There are things you can’t take for granted that some people do. Some people are not even able to enjoy life because of their history.” Tags: Genocide, history, Notre Dame, Rwanda, South Bendlast_img read more

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Partner Nations Train Together to Save Lives

first_imgBy Myriam Ortega/Diálogo October 05, 2018 The air forces of 12 countries strengthened rescue and interoperability capabilities in simulated emergency and highly dangerous missions during multinational exercise Ángel de los Andes II. The Colombian Air Force (FAC, in Spanish) hosted the exercise in the highlands of Cundinamarca and Boyacá departments, September 3rd-14th. More than 400 participants along with 15 fixed-wing aircraft and six rotary-wing aircrafts participated. Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Peru, the United States, and Uruguay took part in the exercise that sought to standardize and improve skills of units operating in rescue missions for natural disasters and combat search and rescue (CSAR). Participants, including service members, medical personnel, and observers, conducted 197 missions, totaling 187 flight hours. “Ángel de los Andes is a FAC-led international exercise,” FAC Lieutenant Colonel John Jairo Báez Gómez, commander of the exercise, told Diálogo. “It seeks to train nations’ capabilities in humanitarian assistance, personnel rescue in environmental emergencies, firefighting, and also rescue missions for isolated or downed crews in hostile environments.” Simulated rescue scenarios The exercises included the simulation of an aerial accident with a plane crash on the road between Barranquilla and Bogotá with 45 passengers aboard. The rescue operation included 150 units from Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and the United States. Participants extracted the wounded with UH-60 Black Hawk and Bell 212 helicopters of the Peruvian Air Force (FAP, in Spanish) and FAC. Units transferred evacuees from the crash site to the area where medical aircraft, such as the U.S. Air Force C-17, waited to airlift victims to hospitals. “This is actually my first time taking part in an exercise of this magnitude,” FAP Lieutenant Romina Feijoo Ojeda, Bell 212 helicopter pilot, told Diálogo. “It’s reassuring to know that many countries worked together for a single goal: saving lives.” Rescue personnel from the air forces of Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Peru, and the United States also faced a simulated magnitude 6.9 earthquake, resulting in more than 30 wounded, who were evacuated. The exercise included rescue operations to extract people from collapsed areas or trapped inside vehicles, in addition to humanitarian airdrops. Another exercise involved extinguishing a forest fire, putting to the test the firefighting capabilities of Bambi Buckets installed in Huey II and UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters, as well as the Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System mounted on a C-130 Hercules. ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles also took part in the mission, transmitting real-time information to the command center. In addition to humanitarian missions, participants carried out CSAR, such as a mock war scenario with an attack on a military convoy that left many injured. Units conducted an air assault while troops rappelled from helicopters to secure the area before evacuating the personnel. “What was most interesting about this experience was the rescue in combat during the second week, because it takes more concentration and preparation in doctrine and procedures,” Lt. Feijoo said. “It’s something we [in Peru] must learn and keep developing and improving every year, so we can be better prepared whenever a situation happens.” A promising future “This has been an excellent opportunity to train with our partner nations,” said U.S. Air Force Colonel Brett Howard, Air Forces Southern/12th Air Force lead for Ángel de los Andes II. “We’ve had many challenges, [but] what we were able to learn is how to overcome those challenges together for mission success.” Carried out for the first time in 2015, the exercise counted on the unprecedented participation of guest partner nation aircraft in its second edition. The number of deployed units also nearly doubled, going from 250 to more than 400. “Our aircraft were able to operate with other aircraft, our commands with other commands, and the lessons learned [were] all of them,” Lt. Col. Báez said. “There are lessons learned from the administrative, logistics, and obviously operational viewpoints, which are being compiled to fuel our doctrine to generate changes in the procedures if required.” Under FAC’s leadership, Ángel de los Andes casts itself as an exercise of great importance for the region. The next edition will be held in 2021. “I’m certain that the next edition in three years will feature more visiting nations or more delegations bringing their own aircraft,” Lt. Col. Báez said. “What’s next for Ángel de los Andes, for FAC, and for Colombia as a benchmark, is very positive.”last_img read more

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‘Move Along’ organization showcases sports are made for anyone

first_imgMove Along frequently visits schools to educated students on the importance of inclusion in sports as well as hosting programs to play sports. For more information visit their website. “Growing up with a disability, there’s things that are pretty difficult and things can be adapted and stuff like that, but I think that even if you have a disability, you can do anything,” said Addison Rosenkrans. “Here’s a chance to realize, ‘I’m not defined by this disability, I’m defined by my abilities to push through what I need to get to,'” said Jeff Wright, executive director for Move Along. “It works out different muscles and it gives you a better idea of what disabled people have to do to stay active,” said Calli Graham. For one student in the class, she has a disability, but she says that doesn’t define her. After trying out the sports, students say, they have a new respect for people with disabilities. center_img “I’ve never been in a wheelchair and have to deal with this, but it’s cool to see what they get to do,” said Myles Clement, a student in the class. CONKLIN (WBNG) — Students at Richard T. Stank Middle School are hitting the court to play sports, but they’re doing it a little differently. ‘Move Along’, an organization that specializes in adaptive sports is showing students across the Southern Tier that sports are for everyone. The class spent time in the gym playing basketball, hockey, and cycling, all using equipment made for people with disabilities. last_img read more

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Virgin Galactic spaceflight test delayed indefinitely due to COVID-19 in New Mexico

first_img– Advertisement – – Advertisement – The space tourism company on Nov. 5 said that the next spaceflight test was scheduled for a launch window between Nov. 19 and Nov. 23. It is planned to be the first of two test spaceflights before Virgin Galactic flies founder Sir Richard Branson and then begins commercial operations.Shares of Virgin Galactic fell as much as 10% in early trading from its previous close of $22.27. Virgin Galactic’s carrier aircraft releases its spacecraft Unity during a glide flight test.Virgin Galactic – Advertisement – Virgin Galactic’s stock dropped after the company said on Monday that it’s next spaceflight test is now delayed due to new COVID-19 restrictions implemented by New Mexico.“We will be minimizing our New Mexico operations to the greatest degree possible. While these new restrictions cause us to adjust our flight schedule, we take this pause in stride and will be prepared to resume our pre-flight procedures and announce a new test flight window as soon as we can,” Virgin Galactic CEO Michael Colglazier said in a statement.While the company’s manufacturing and development facilities are in California’s Mojave Desert, its base of operations is at Spaceport America in New Mexico.- Advertisement – Subscribe to CNBC PRO for exclusive insights and analysis, and live business day programming from around the world.last_img read more

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Kresna goes about business as usual despite reports of problems related to Jiwasraya

first_imgThe Financial Services Authority (OJK) has denied rumors that investment management firm PT Kresna Asset Management and life insurer PT Kresna Life are under investigation by the Attorney General’s Office (AGO). The fund manager also reports business as usual with no disruption linked to the high-profile Jiwasraya case, as speculated.OJK public relations and logistics deputy commissioner Anto Prabowo said on Thursday that Kresna Asset Management (KAM) and Kresna Life were going about business as usual and were not connected to the case of ailing state-owned insurer PT Asuransi Jiwasraya.“They are not relevant to the AGO’s investigation of assets and accounts [in Jiwasraya],” he said in a statement to the press, referring to reports in local media that KAM and Kresna Life’s securities account had been blocked due to the investigation. Previously, several local media reported that KAM and Kresna Life’s securities accounts had been blocked by the AGO as they were rumored to be relevant to Jiwasraya’s investment mismanagement case. Such reports emerged after KAM’s customers reportedly claimed that they were unable to redeem their mutual funds from the company.However, KAM soon dismissed the reports, saying that customers were indeed able to redeem their mutual funds. “We also stress that we are not connected to the Jiwasraya case,” the statement read.Kresna Life, however, has yet to issue a statement on its rumored connection to the case. The AGO ordered the suspension of 800 securities accounts related to Jiwasraya as part of its ongoing investigation to uncover the alleged corruption in the ailing insurer that resulted in its failure to repay policyholders’ claims totaling Rp 16 trillion (US$ 1.17 billion) as of January. Topics :last_img read more

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GNER orders Pendolini

first_imgBERMUDA-based shipping group Sea Containers is to order tilting trains from Fiat Ferroviaria for its British train operating franchisee Great North Eastern Railway. The signing of heads of agreement covering two trains was announced on September 9, at a price believed to be around £15m each. There is an option for GNER to buy a further six sets, subject to obtaining an extension to its seven-year franchise which expires in 2002-03.GNER plans to introduce the trains on the East Coast main line between London and Edinburgh ’in the autumn of 2000’. Each 11-car train, with distributed traction equipment supplied by GEC Alsthom Traction, will have seating for 500 passengers, and be capable of speeds ’over 225 km/h’. Sea Containers says the 633 km journey will be cut from 3h 59min to 3h 30min, at an average speed of 180 km/h. Substantial infrastructure investment will be needed, including the closure of level crossings and the provision of cab signalling. GNER will have to obtain a dispensation from HM Railway Inspectorate to carry passengers in the leading vehicle of a train running at over 160 km/h.Virgin Railways called tenders on August 29 for a fleet of 40 tilting trains to operate inter-city services on its West Coast routes from London to Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool and Glasgow. Bids are due on November 3, and Virgin says 12 firms have pre-qualified, including General Electric and General Motors. Bids to supply up to 400 high-speed DMU cars for the Virgin Cross Country business were due on September 29. olast_img read more

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