17 Complete 2017 USI Community Leadership Program

first_imgConnect with Southern Indiana presentation17 individuals successfully completed University of Southern Indiana’s 2017 Connect with Southern Indiana program on May 5. An annual leadership program, Connect with Southern Indiana was established in 2006 and is managed by Community Engagement, a department within USI Outreach and Engagement.The program is in its fifth year of using the Romain College of Business Entrepreneurship Initiative model as a guide. Participants attended 10 full-day sessions focusing on divergent and analytical thinking, idea generation, communication and strategic entrepreneurship from a community development perspective.This year, that entrepreneurial mindset was applied to the program’s theme of advanced health care directives. Participants teamed up to create innovative ways to encourage southern Indiana communities to have conversations about their own advanced directives to better plan for their future health care needs. Teams presented their collaborative projects at the conclusion of the program.Below is a list of the projects, the team members involved and a brief description of the project:The Conversation Game: Caylin Blockley, Nicole Osborne and Erin McCracken MerrisThe Conversation Game is a board game that helps families enhance their relationships and ability to talk about the sensitive subject of life and death.AHCP2Go: Echo Ira, Tammy Oliver and Chaze PatrickAHCP2Go is designed to foster effective conversations in a multi-mode platform that is suitable for various populations in the Southwest Indiana.SILC – Southwestern Indiana Life Conversations: Martha Seal, Martha Vance, Melissa Walden and Loc DuongThis project consists of the rebranding of and the creation of a website and social media platform for New Harmony Conversations.Advance Directives (A Purr-fect Conversation): Rasheedah Jackson, Casey Trela, Sara Dzimianski and Jenell SchueThis program utilizes pets as a conversation starter.Progressive Benefits – Health Care Derivatives for Employees: Sara Hopkins, Allison Brown and Tonya RineThis program utilizes human resource departments to facilitate the promotion and creation of employees’ advance healthcare directives.Connect with Southern Indiana continues to promote active citizenship for individuals across a nine-county region in southwest Indiana. Connect with Southern Indiana is open to Indiana residents living in Dubois, Gibson, Knox, Perry, Pike, Posey, Spencer, Vanderburgh or Warrick counties who would like to improve the quality of life in their communities.The 2017 graduating class includes:Dubois County:                                                   Jenell Schue, supervisor of central scheduling, Memorial Hospital and Health Care CenterGibson County:Melissa Walden, director of marketing and development, The Arc of Gibson CountyKnox County:Martha Vance, business and industry coordinator, Vincennes UniversityPike County:Sarah Hopkins, 4-H youth development educator, Purdue Extension Pike CountyPosey County:Allison Brown, senior gallery associate, USI New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary ArtCasey Trela, director of financial aid, Ivy Tech Community CollegeSpencer County:Sara Dzimianski, extension educator, Purdue Extension Perry CountyNicole Osborne, human resources and development coordinator, Lincoln Hills Development CorpVanderburgh County:Caylin Blockley, assistant director, USI Alumni and Volunteer ServicesLoc Duong, admission assistant, USI Center of International ProgramsEcho Ira, market research analyst, Vectren CorporationRasheedah Jackson, childcare and development director, Memorial Community Development CorporationErin McCracken Merris, community engagement manager, USI Historic New HarmonyTammy Oliver, recruiting supervisor, USI Career Services and InternshipsChaze Patrick, marketing intern, USI Outreach and EngagementTonya Rine, senior electric financial analyst, Vectren CorporationMartha Seal, development director, Holly’s HouseIndividual headshots of the graduates can be downloaded here.For additional information on the Connect with Southern Indiana program visit USI.edu/connect or contact Leslie Townsend, director of Community Engagement, at [email protected] LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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SIGEP selection rounds to be held at ABST conference

first_imgThe qualifying and selection rounds for the 2011 UK SIGEP Bread Cup Team will take place at the Alliance for Bakery Students and Trainees (ABST) annual conference on 12 June.The conference, which will be held at Alton Towers Conference Centre from 11-13 June, will host four competition classes for the SIGEP Bread Cup: Artisan Bread; Innovative Bread; Cake; and Artistic Bread Centrepiece. The winner of each class will then go forward to compete as part of the UK team in the four-day live SIGEP Bread Cup in Rimini, Italy, in January 2011.On this occasion, the selection will not be a live competition but the judging of pre-made products at the selected venue. Two of the five expert judges for the selection of the UK team will be from Club Arti e Mestieri, including head international judge Fausto Rivola.The UK team will be expected to meet, train, refine and build upon each others’ skills and experiences in order to attain the bond required at this exceptional level of competition.Competitors may enter one of more of the four classes and entry forms must be in by Friday 14 May.For more details and an entry form please contact Graham Duckworth: [email protected]last_img read more

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Senate nominates co-director, discusses constitutional changes

first_imgThe student senate confirmed senior Molly Knapp as the co-director of the department of social concerns at a meeting Wednesday.The senate confirmed Knapp, a commissioner in the department during the fall semester, with zero oppositions and zero abstentions.Senior and student body president Becca Blais said she nominated Knapp to join the current director, senior Austin Matheny, due to the shifting focus and size of the department.The department of social concerns is split into two groups to focus on separate topics: global affairs and sustainability. Each group meets separately, and Blais said Knapp has been leading the committee on global affairs with great success, while Matheny has been leading the group on sustainability.“It was getting a little complicated,” Blais said of the decision to make Knapp a co-director. “Both sides of the department still have a lot of work to do in the last two months in terms of massive programming and policy initiatives.”Because of the broad scope of the department of social concerns, having two directors will allow the groups to work independently and might allow future senates to split the department into two, Blais said.“As co-director, Molly will have greater autonomy in leading her department committee,” she said. “The department as one cohesive body will have a greater chance at tackling all of the remaining platform and other items.”Knapp previously served as an NDVotes dorm representative in Lewis Hall, vice president for the class of 2018’s Sophomore Class Council and a member of the class of 2018’s Freshman Class Council. She is also a student worker at both the Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) and the International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP).“I have full confidence that Molly and Austin will serve as an incredible team, and that she will fit perfectly within the executive cabinet for the remainder of our term,” Blais said.Blais read a letter from Matheny in which he also expressed his endorsement of Knapp to be his co-director.“Within her role, Molly has continuously demonstrated passion for the work that she does and poise in the face of adversity,” Matheny said in the letter.Last semester, Knapp’s team on the global affairs committee organized the events to raise awareness about the Rohingya refugee crisis, and Matheny said the work would have been impossible without Knapp.“As a member of the executive cabinet and of student government as a whole, I have been lucky enough to work alongside some of the most passionate … people that this prestigious university has to offer,” Matheny said. “I can say without hestitation that Molly Knapp is one of those people.”Following Knapp’s confirmation, student union parliamentarian and junior Colin Brankin presented proposed constitutional changes to the student senate.The changes reorganize and clarify various articles in the constitution, including instructing future student senates on how to vote on new constitutions, explicitly requiring all nine student union organizations to submit bylaws to the ethics committee and clarifying the quorum — the minimum number of voters to make a proceeding valid — to be two-thirds in any student government vote.“There are essentially zero content changes, with the exception of one point of clarification,” Brankin said. “Everything is just reorganizing it for the sake of reading it and so it flows well together.”The changes reiterate that the student union secretary must post the minutes, agenda and resolutions of each meeting on the website. Another edit clarifies that, given certain offenses, any position holder in the student union can be impeached.Brankin also noted the upcoming student senate elections and brought the senators’ attention to the addition of a “For Prospective Senators” tab on the student government website.The site includes information about who can be a senator, what senate does and the meaning of senatorial committees. The website also has links to the constitution, the Judicial Council website and embeds the Parliamentary Procedure and Senate Rules Guidebook.Brankin and judicial council president and senior Matt Ross will be holding a prospective senator information session Feb. 13 to provide interested students with more information about senate. The session will be held at 7 p.m. in the Montgomery Auditorium of the LaFortune Student Center.Tags: constitutional changes, department of social concerns, Notre Dame Student Senate, student senatelast_img read more

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Cover crop

first_imgBy Bob WesterfieldUniversity of GeorgiaIf tending your summer garden has you exhausted and ready for a break, consider planting a cover crop before storing your garden tools for the winter. A cover crop can give your garden a neat appearance and help protect the soil from erosion. Cover crops also add rich organic nutrients when they are tilled in the spring. I prefer a combination cover crop of a small grain such as wheat, rye or oats mixed with a legume such as clover or Australian winter peas. Small grains nurse and protect the slower germinating clover or peas.Clover is a very small seed so it will only take a pound or less mixed with wheat to cover the average garden. Clover needs to be inoculated if it is not already done when you buy it. Inoculation covers the seed in black powdered bacteria that helps to digest the seed coat and increase germination. I find the best way to inoculate the seed is to pour the seed and a bag of inoculant in a small bucket and add a little soft drink to the mix. Mix the seed thoroughly by hand with the black powder and soft drink. Don’t use too much liquid, only enough to help the bacteria stick to the seed. I then mix in a few pounds of small grain, like wheat, and spread this with a hand spreader on my tilled garden. I usually add a few pounds of 10-10-10 per 100 square feet of garden to get things going. Over time, the clover will produce its own nitrogen and assist the wheat. As a side note, don’t use rye grass as a cover crop. It is very persistent and tends to hang around too long in the spring. It also prevents other plants from growing well.last_img read more

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Burton Snowboards Brings The Stash to Killington

first_imgBurton Snowboards Brings The Stash to Killington Resort in VermontBurlington, VT (September 29, 2008) – Burton Snowboards and Killington Resort has announced plans to build The Stash, a revolutionary resort run created by Jake Burton and Burton team riders that utilizes the natural terrain, local wood products and organic features to create the ultimate freestyle riding experience. The first run of its kind in New England and Burton’s home state of Vermont, The Stash at Killington is slated to open to the public on December 19, 2008.”Bringing the Stash to Vermont has been an objective from the start,” says Jake Burton, Founder and Chairman of Burton Snowboards. “Vermont riders are all about tree riding and jibs. This will take it to the next level, giving local riders a chance to have that much more fun on the mountain.”Located at the Bear Mountain area of Killington and accessible by the new Skye Peak Express high-speed quad chairlift, The Stash will be a half-mile long run that features wooded glades, banked turns, log slides and pillow lines. The Stash at Killington will also feature a street-style wooden staircase and a jibbable fence. A classic Vermont sugar shack cabin that can be jibbed or jumped will reside at The Stash at Killlington. Inside the sugar shack, riders can check out a timeline of snowboarding history in Vermont along with vintage snowboard gear and photos.Burton pro snowboarder and Lincoln, Vermont native Yale Cousino is working with Burton and Killington on design ideas for The Stash. Snow Park Technologies, an industry leader in terrain park development, is also adding its expertise to the design and construction of The Stash. Features for The Stash are built with local and organic materials like rocks, stumps and logs. By using local trees and natural elements on the trail, The Stash is designed to limit the impact on the environment.”We are extremely pleased to work with Burton on this project and offer our guests the opportunity to experience The Stash at Killington,” said Chris Nyberg, president and general manager of Killington Resort. “The organic nature of The Stash also aligns with our company’s environmental initiatives.”Michael Bettera of Snow Park Technologies had this to say, “I am excited to be working on The Stash project at Killington. With the resort’s deep snowboarding history, close proximity to Burton and the gnarly glade terrain, The Stash at Killington will stand out as a premier riding location.”The Stash at Killington Resort is the fifth run of its kind worldwide and the first in the Northeast. The Stash can also be found at Northstar-at-Tahoe, USA; Avoriaz, France; The Remarkables, New Zealand and Flachauwinkl Resort, Austria. For more information, visit www.thestash.com(link is external).About Burton SnowboardsIn 1977, Jake Burton Carpenter founded Burton Snowboards out of his Vermont barn. Since then, Burton has fueled the growth of snowboarding worldwide through its groundbreaking product lines, its team of top snowboarders and its grassroots efforts to get the sport accepted at resorts. In 1996, Burton began growing its family of brands to include boardsports and apparel brands. Privately held and owned by Jake, Burton’s headquarters are in Burlington, Vermont with offices in California, Austria, Japan and Australia. For more information, visit www.burton.com(link is external).About Killington ResortThe largest ski and snowboard resort in eastern North America, Killington debuts $8.4 million in improvements for its 50th Birthday Season, including the new Skye Peak Express and “The Stash”. Killington Resort features diverse terrain, an expansive lift network, the most extensive snowmaking system in the world and numerous off-mountain activities, including après, dining, shopping and lodging options. www.killington.com(link is external).last_img read more

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June 1, 2004 Letters

first_img June 1, 2004 Regular News Dear Fellow Bar Members;It is with deep gratitude and appreciation that I thank all of Florida’s lawyers for all that you have done to bring the State Courts System through one of the most difficult challenges we have faced.When I wrote to you in an open letter in March 2003, you enthusiastically responded to my plea for help. Your many hours of hard work and dedicated service, and your loyalty and un­wa­ver­ing commitment to protecting and preserving Florida’s trial courts were crucial to the successful im­ple­mentation of Revision 7 to Article V of Florida’s Constitution. Thanks to you and the outstanding lead­ership and dedication of Florida’s trial judges, our courts will continue to fulfill the right of ac­cess to justice enshrined in our fundamental law. Congratulations on a job well done! It could not have been done without you.One last reminder: Not all the work on Revision 7 is completed, and I need to ask for your ad­ditional help in the months ahead. Please contact your local chief judge to see how you and your col­leagues can assist as we now seek continuation of funding from the county commissions for many im­portant services not covered by the state budget. We must convince our local leaders to continue to provide these critical service to their citizens. The important reasons for providing these services are just as valid today as they were when the county commissions originally decided their citizens needed these services.I must rely on the your leadership and ongoing assistance in supporting the con­tinuation of local court services in your communities. Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead Florida Supreme CourtDiversity Open Letter to The Florida Bar The April 30 article concerning new Rule 4-5.8 was interesting. Board member Greg Parker’s comments justifying the rule are somewhat off base.Clients don’t “belong” to law firms. Law firms belong to the client. A rule that prohibits the departing lawyer from advising the client that the individual, who has handled their matter, probably knows more about the matter than anyone else, and with whom the client has reposed trust and confidence, may no longer be handling the case is ill conceived and a disservice to clients.The most critical information for a client is who is responsible for their matter. The rule as drafted has the potential to cause harm to the client. Early and timely notice of such a change should be encouraged so the client is not put at a disadvantage or at risk.A better approach would be for the Bar to create a mandatory disclosure document that notifies the client, sets forth the client’s options, and eliminates the concern about solicitation that the proposed rule seeks to address. The document should be signed by the departing attorney and the firm. The rule should also prohibit disclosure to a client prior to notification to the firm of the lawyer’s intended departure. This would protect everyone’s interests while keeping the client “reasonably informed about the status of a matter” as required by Rule 4-1.4. Robert T. Maher Ft. MyersDeath Warrants The writer of a May 1 letter seems pretty exercised over the fact that Florida is a state where the legislature determines how much funding the court system will receive and controls the Rules of Civil Procedure.It seems to offend everything his fifth-grade teacher taught him about the three branches of government.They both must really be upset over the way our federal government operates — where the legislature determines the funding for the court system, and has the final say over the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Barry Augenbraun St. PetersburgMammograms In the April 30 article, “Symposium lays out diversity roadmap,” many of the recommendations made on diversity are counterproductive for they erroneously assume that inclusion of minorities has to accompany lowered standards and less competition.For example, relying less on traditional grades and LSAT scores lowers standards and does nothing to assist underrepresented groups. The proposal of “countering the trend where minority trial judges are more likely to draw opponents” for reelection borders on paternalism toward minority judicial candidates.To increase diversity, the Bar must first reject the well-meaning but misguided idea that minorities are more fragile than non-minorities and thus need separate treatment. Lowering standards to increase minority representation is not only an artificial means of conquering exclusion, but it is also offensive toward minorities.Panel representatives should move away from their inferred opposition to competition. Underrepresented groups need empowerment to compete at expected levels of performance, not paternalism or lowered expectations. We cannot institute artificially predetermined outcomes and then declare success on diversity. Rather, we succeed by equipping all persons with the tools to succeed and then instituting an open and affirming Bar. Having a minority recruitment team in the Bar and at various law schools, encouraging mentoring for underrepresented groups in college, high school, and even middle school, and advertising in traditionally minority civic, religious and cultural publications is positive.The Bar should also recognize that no amount of Bar compassion can overcome the structural legacy of a minority majority “F-rated” public school. And, lest we forget, when we refer to underrepresented groups, we should remember the most underrepresented group: the poor. Though minorities are disproportionately poor, it is also true that the greatest representation of poverty exists among the poor themselves, regardless of race. Attorneys have a moral commitment to those living in poverty to reach out and provide opportunity.Thus, by looking less at opportunity and more at outcomes, the Bar would be doing itself, as well as minorities, a disservice. The Bar does have an obvious moral duty to reach out. However, it must reach out in a nonpaternalistic manner which acknowledges past gains, current challenges, and future possibilities in making a Bar open to all, regardless of race, gender, age, religion, disability, or sexual orientation. Luis Viera MiamiClient Contact As a citizen of this state and a survivor of breast cancer, I am appalled to have read in the April 30 News that Rep. Carole A. Green is sponsoring a bill that would make radiologists who read mammograms immune from medical malpractice suits unless they are grossly negligent. The justification she gives is that there are not enough radiologists in Florida to read mammograms.Proving gross negligence in civil cases is akin to proving manslaughter in criminal cases—an extremely difficult standard to meet and one that would allow the vast majority, indeed most likely all, of radiologists to incur no liability whatsoever for their failure to properly read a mammogram. This lack of accountability will only serve to result in contributing to a problem in Florida that I see as a medical malpractice attorney—women are dying because of improperly read mammograms.In the vast majority of cases, breast cancer is survivable if it is detected in the early stages. The longer it goes undetected, the greater the mortality rate. It is for this reason that allowing radiologists who fail to detect cancer to have no liability, i.e., responsibility, when the standard of care, i.e., what the majority of physicians in the community would have done, required them to detect it, would mean that more women in Florida will die unnecessarily from this very treatable disease.It is particularly alarming to me that Rep. Green is proposing this bill without any formal study or the need for one. To propose such a bill based only on anecdotal and circumstantial evidence without hard statistical data is irresponsible.I for one have no problem in getting an appointment for a mammogram, and I’ve never heard anyone complain that they’ve not been able to get a mammogram or have had to wait an inordinately long time to get a mammogram. Moreover, if a woman or her physician has detected a lump and there is concern about it, a mammogram can and should be ordered on an expedited basis.One of the great things about this country is that everyone is held accountable for what they do. Doctors should be no exception. Indeed, given that doctors hold our lives in their hands, doctors especially should be no exception. Maria P. Sperando Stuart Editor’s Note: The bill in question, SB 2306, passed unanimously in both chambers. It calls for a study on the availability and usage of mammograms in Florida, with the report to be issued by the end of the year. That language replaced earlier drafts in both House and Senate bills that would have given radiologists reading mammograms immunity from medical malpractice cases except in cases of gross negligence. Bill backers said high malpractice insurance premiums are driving radiologists away from mammography, making it hard for women to get those services in many areas of the state. An April 30 letter overstates the authority of the governor with respect to the execution of a death sentence.When the governor signs a death warrant, he is acting in a ministerial capacity and in obedience to a duty imposed by law. “If a death sentence is not executed because of unjustified failure of the governor to issue a warrant, or for any other unjustifiable reason, on application of the Department of Legal Affairs, the Supreme Court shall issue a warrant directing the sentence to be executed during a week designated in the warrant.” F.S. §922.14 (emphasis supplied). John Paul Parks Phoenix, AZThe writer in the April 30 letter regarding the death penalty obviously knows the “specifics” of the law, i.e., the governor signs death warrants per F.S. §922.052. However, it’s a good idea not to only check the law but more to make sure you know how it works.To presume that a Florida governor has the power “to not” sign a warrant exhibits a lack of knowledge of the legal and political “realities” in this stateThat reality is simple, but that simplicity is: “No death warrants signed results in no executions, results in a lame-duck governor.” No governor wanting re-election will risk going down that road. Any governor not signing death warrants because of personal conviction necessarily makes himself a target and invites a “referendum” on the death penalty issue in the next election. Opponents of the death penalty never want a referendum of the people on that issue, for they always lose and then have to claim support of (an unelected) “higher authority.” The death penalty issue rests where it properly belongs: with the jury, the only “higher authority” recognized by our laws for determining when a person has voided his right to life. Millard C. Glancy Coral SpringsWriting the Rules June 1, 2004 Letterslast_img read more

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Are you a pre-crastinator?

first_imgYou get into work with three projects on your plate that you want to get started, post haste.  You settle down with your Java and flip on the computer. You can’t resist just one quick peak at your email and Wham! Before you know it, you are an emailing machine, embracing your in-box with the eagerness of a five year old in a chocolate factory. You got so much done that you don’t have time to get started on those projects you were going to throw yourself into. After lunch, you have a follow-up meeting to the follow-up meeting you attended last week. Before you know it the day is over, the projects are still waiting and, my God, there is still more email to open.The first step toward a solution is to admit there is a problem. It is clear to me that, as a nation, we are suffering from an email-fueled pandemic of pre-crastination, which researchers at the University of Pennsylvania define as the tendency to complete, or at least begin, tasks as soon as possible, even at the expense of extra physical effort.Their definition was the outgrowth of the following experiment. As described by Psychology Today, Students were lined up and asked to choose one of two buckets filled with pennies to carry to the end of an alley without stopping. They were asked to do whatever seemed easier—pick up and carry the left bucket to the far left platform with the left hand, or pick up and carry the right bucket to the far right platform with the right hand. Buckets varied in their distance to the end of the alley. The researchers expected the participants to pick up the buckets that were the shortest distance to the end of the alley but instead they almost always picked up the buckets that were closest to them even though it meant they had to do more work. When the students were asked why they made this choice they typically responded that “I wanted to get the task done as soon as I could.”In the old days, we would simply have responded to this research with that aphorism from your grandmother that “haste-makes-waste” and call it a day. But the experiment demonstrates that in an age of email and text messaging, pre-crastination is as big of problem as procrastination. After all, if the natural impulse of your employees when they get to the credit union each morning is to respond to the first email they see, as opposed to taking on their most important task, your credit union has a lot of very hardworking but ultimately inefficient workers.In fact, it is possible that we, the American Worker, are nothing but adult versions of those hordes of teenagers we observe with disgust as they stare down at their smartphones while standing next to the very person they are texting. We aren’t doing the most important work, just responding to the task imbedded in the most recent email.Is there a solution? This week my youngest daughter survived No TV Week.  I’m proposing that the American workplace should have a modified Kick-The-Inbox Week. Participants would have to pledge not to spend more than 10 minutes daily reviewing their email; agree to actually call someone with whom they previously have corresponded exclusively with email; talk to workmates as opposed to emailing them, and, most importantly, pledge to take on the most important task of their day first.Who knows? If we can kick our pre-crastination habits, maybe we will have time for some good old fashioned procrastination. 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Henry Meier As General Counsel for the New York Credit Union Association, Henry is actively involved in all legislative, regulatory and legal issues impacting New York credit unions. Whether he’s joining … Web: www.nycua.org Detailslast_img read more

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GasLog takes delivery of Centrica-chartered GasLog Windsor

first_imgLiquefied natural gas (LNG) shipper GasLog said it has taken delivery of a newbuild vessel from the South Korean Samsung Heavy Industries shipyard. Despite the industrial disruption in South Korea caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, the vessel was delivered on time and on budget, GasLog noted in its statement. Powered by a low-pressure dual-fuel engine, GasLog Windsor is capable of transporting 180,000 cubic meters of the chilled fuel. Upon delivery will be chartered to Pioneer Shipping Limited, a unit of UK-based Centrica. The shipper signed a charter deal with Centrica for an initial period of about seven years. GasLog said in a statement that the GasLog Windsor has joined its fleet on April 1. The vessel completed sea trials earlier in February.last_img

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Italy Faces Existential Threat Over Low Birthrate: President

first_imgInternationalLifestyleNews Italy Faces Existential Threat Over Low Birthrate: President by: – February 12, 2020 Share Tweet Sharing is caring! Italy’s growing demographic crisis, with births falling and life expectancy rising, is one reason for its chronically stagnant economy, and the situation is getting worse.National statistics agency ISTAT said there were 435,000 births last year, down 5,000 on 2018 and the lowest level ever recorded in Italy. Deaths totaled 647,000 in 2019, some 14,000 more than the year earlier.“This is a problem that concerns the very existence of our country,” Mattarella said shortly after the data was released. “The fabric of our country is weakening and everything must be done to counter this phenomenon.”“As an old person I am well aware of the falling birth rate,” added Mattarella, who is 78.Italy’s overall population fell by 116,000 to 60.3 million, with a steady rise in migrant and immigrant births helping to offset the declining domestic birth rate.Many other European countries are suffering similar challenges, especially in ex-communist eastern Europe, while Germany has also seen a decline in domestic births partly offset by increased migrant and immigrant births.Birth rates have held up better in France and Britain.Italy’s population had risen virtually every year since World War One, hitting a peak in 2015 at 60.8 million, but has since started to decline.ISTAT said the gap between births and deaths was getting wider, with just 67 newborns last year for every 100 people who died. Ten years ago there were 96 births for every 100 deaths.Life expectancy in Italy has continued to push up, hitting 85.3 years for women and 81 years for men — one of the highest rates in Europe — while the average age in Italy is now 45.7.Successive Italian governments have promised to do more to boost births, but have so far failed to resolve the problem.The current administration has offered lower income couples grants of up to 160 euros ($175) per month to help cover costs during the first year of a baby’s life and also promised young families up to 3,000 euros a year to cover nursery charges. 99 Views   no discussions Share (Reuters) – Italy’s future is threatened by its diminishing birthrate, President Sergio Mattarella said on Tuesday, as new data showed the population had shrunk once again in 2019. Sharelast_img read more

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