USS Theodore Roosevelt Promotes 264 Sailors

first_img USS Theodore Roosevelt Promotes 264 Sailors On the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) 264 Sailors were advanced to the next pay grade during a frocking ceremony, May 24.Capt. Daniel Grieco, Theodore Roosevelt’s commanding officer, personally presented a frocking letter to each Sailor and congratulated them for their achievement.Frocked Sailors receive the right to wear the uniform and assume the responsibilities of their next pay grade as a result of their hard work and dedication while continuing leadership development.TR promoted 143 Sailors to third class petty officer, 94 to second class petty officer and 26 to first class petty officer.Image: US Navy Authorities View post tag: 264 View post tag: USS Theodore Roosevelt May 27, 2015 Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Theodore Roosevelt Promotes 264 Sailors View post tag: News by topiccenter_img View post tag: promotes View post tag: sailors Share this article View post tag: Naval View post tag: americas View post tag: Navylast_img read more

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Schools To Remain Closed For Rest Of Year; State Braces For Historic Unemployment

first_imgBy Erica Irish TheStatehouseFile.com INDIANAPOLIS—The intensifying COVID-19 pandemic is spelling new and unprecedented consequences for the world, and Indiana is no exception, state officials said as they unveiled the latest tolls of the disease and new steps proposed to stem its spread.“If you’re starting to act when you see the spread, it’s too late, it’s already moving its way across your community,” Gov. Eric Holcomb said at the virtual press briefing Thursday, one in a series of daily updates this week. “We are not going to be figuratively or literally whistling past the graveyard. We are going to be taking the steps that need to be taken in the state of Indiana.”The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases rose to 3,039 Thursday, according to reports from the Indiana State Department of Health. At least 78 people have died from the respiratory disease, and Indiana State Health Commissioner Dr. Kristina Box said hospitals are reporting an estimated 700 patients confirmed to have or suspected of having COVID-19 are being treated intensive care units around the state.Superintendent of Public Instruction Jennifer McCormick, Indiana’s chief education officer, joined Holcomb and other leaders in the virtual briefing to announce the state’s K-12 schools are to remain closed for the rest of the year.The decision is prompting Indiana’s school districts to prepare for extended alternative learning, either online or in hybrid models that blend e-communication with print packets. McCormick said school districts will need to submit plans for this alternative learning by April 17. She also said high school seniors enrolled in courses required for graduation will receive credit regardless of what happens in the coming months to ensure as many students graduate as possible.McCormick acknowledged the response to COVID-19 isn’t perfect for students and their families, and especially for those who might lack access to the tools they need for at-home learning and for students who need special education and remedial teaching.“We know we will have some work to do, but our local schools are very aware of that,” McCormick said. “The capacity on this may look different going forward. It’s changed a lot of things. It’s also been an urgency call to many of our school districts.”Accompanying this burden on healthcare and education is a “historic” rise in unemployment claims, according to information provided by Indiana Department of Workforce Development Commissioner Fred Payne.An estimated 146,243 residents applied for unemployment in the past week — the week ending in March 28 — and more than 62,300 more claims were filed in the two weeks prior. Payne compared the numbers to the height of the 2008 recession, which saw Indiana’s highest number of unemployment claims in any one-month period at 157,000.Fred Payne of the Department of Workforce Development described the surge in unemployment claims as a result of the coronavirus at Thursday’s virtual press conference. Photo by Janet Williams, TheStatehouseFile.com.Now, Payne said the state and his department will need to prepare to break this standard each week as more residents file for unemployment.“The number of claims we’re received in a one-month period at the highest point of our downturn is what we may be seeing now on a weekly basis,” Payne said.Payne said he and his department are awaiting federal guidelines to help additional claims, too, including for those from independent contractors and freelances. But those guidelines have yet to be released, causing claims from those groups to be temporarily denied.While Holcomb has yet to announce an extension to his stay-at-home order, which is set to expire next Monday, he said he will provide more guidance on the order before the weekend and urged residents to take the crisis seriously.“Don’t be a denier. Don’t deny the facts. COVID-19 is spreading across this country, spreading across our state, as I just tried to articulate, at a scale and a pace that is unprecedented,” Holcomb said. “And if you want to destroy our economy long-term, then don’t deal with the virus.”Erica Irish is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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News story: MAIB Annual Report 2017 published

first_imgWe have published our annual report, which highlights the work of the branch during 2017 and includes: Press enquiries during office hours 01932 440015 Press enquiries Read MAIB Annual Report 2017center_img a report from the Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents an overview of accidents reported a summary of investigations started details of investigation reports published responses to recommendations issued marine accident statistics Press enquiries out of hours 020 7944 4292last_img

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A bright future ahead: Orange Bakery, Watlington

first_imgCommunity support: Each of the oranges on the wall, painted by Kitty’s godmother, represent a crowdfunding donor who helped get the bakery up and running. Bread with personality: Loaves include a wholemeal sourdough, white sourdough and the famous Marmite ‘comfort loaf’. All are made from starters with names including Chad, Barry and Leslie.All in a name: “When I was in a bad place, I would only wear orange dungarees as they were the only things I felt comfortable in. That’s where the name comes from,” explains Kitty.Take it slow: These ‘slow jars’ are filled with homemade preserves, confit, sauerkraut and pickles, providing colourful decoration, as well as delicious bakery ingredients.Homemade: The bakery, in an extension to the Taits’ house, has three Rofco B40 ovens and other equipment, including a mixer and proving baskets donated by the baking community.A sweet life: Kitty’s cinnamon buns are in high demand, selling out on the day British Baker visits. “I make 50 a day,” she says. The rest of the menu is flexible. “We bake what we feel like.” It was an eventful day at Orange Bakery when British Baker visited. A queue of eager customers waited outside, the family terriers had escaped on their morning walk and, to top it all off, Environmental Health turned up for a spot inspection.But amid the chaos stood a smiling 15-year-old Kitty Tait in flour-dusted overalls, dishing out freshly made loaves and cinnamon buns to her regulars. For Kitty, the community is at the heart of the operation – both the local community in Watlington and the wider baking one.“We are really supported by the community and that has made a huge difference to us,” explains Alex Tait, Kitty’s dad, and owner of Orange Bakery.It’s evident in the interactions between customers and the Tait family. Despite only opening two months ago, they have a slew of regulars, who seem continually delighted by the treats available.A bricks-and-mortar bakery wasn’t always the end goal for the duo, who began baking bread for therapeutic reasons after Kitty had to drop out of school due to illness.“I was in a really bad place mentally,” explains Kitty. “My dad used to bake a loaf about once a month, although it was a bit like a breeze block, and asked if I wanted to help him make it. Baking gave my mind a break. It was an extremely therapeutic escape from all the pain.”After a bit of practice, word spread of the amazing loaves being produced by Alex and Kitty, and a subscription service was set up to cater for families in the town. Not long after, the opportunity to take over a shop on the high street presented itself and a crowdfunding campaign was launched to help kit it out. Established members of the baking community were among those to step up.A mixer was donated by London-based Pophams Bakery, proving baskets came from Hart’s Bakery in Bristol and Kitty gained work experience in a number of places, including The Dusty Knuckle Bakery in Dalston, London and Hamblin Bread in east Oxford.All of the equipment is located up the road from the shop in the Taits’ house, located in an extension that was briefly destined to be a dining area. Another kitchen space is on the horizon.“We have planning permission and a foundation for an extension outside in the garden, but as we don’t have a lot of money we want to build it out of scrap doors and old materials,” says Kitty.“One of our principles is we have to be able to do it on a low budget and in a compromised set-up – the kitchen is in our house,” Alex adds. “But if we can show to people that it can be done, and you can launch a subscription service, pop-up or bakery without having to look for a £50,000 investment, then there’s a future in that.”The benefit of this forward-planning, notes Alex, is it allows Kitty a number of avenues to explore, once her GCSEs are out of the way next year. Things are already taking off, with Kitty holding bakery classes for local children, appearing at Theatre of Food at 2019’s Latitude Festival and becoming an ambassador for the Real Bread Campaign.“I could focus on perfection in bread, but there is no perfection because it’s a wild beast,” she says.Orange Bakery, WatlingtonWho: Orange Bakery is run by father and daughter team Alex and 15-year-old Kitty Tait.What: A bakery renowned among the locals for its sourdough loaves and cinnamon buns, as well as its selection of sweet and savoury baked treats, such as cheese straws, croissants and cookies.When: Orange Bakery began life as a subscription service offering bread to families in the local area. Pop-ups followed and the duo opened a physical store in May 2019 after a successful crowdfunding campaign.Where: 10 High Street, Watlington, Oxfordshire, OX49 5PSWhy: “I want to make really good bread accessible to and good for everyone,” Kitty says. “A big part of that – and the bakery – was that we didn’t want to make it intimidating.”Photo credit: daisy-vcmlast_img read more

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Foot and Paddle: Cathedral Pines for all seasons

first_imgYellow Trail, Cathedral PinesAn April day in the Western Mountains is like a Forrest Gump box of chocolates. You never know what flavor you are going to get! A gardener in New Sharon could be planting peas this month; while people in Phillips are still making maple syrup; and north of Eustis, snowshoes or backcountry skis may be the order of the day for travel on foot.One of my favored spots in any season is Cathedral Pines in Eustis. Here a well-marked trail system offers a choice of routes over essentially level ground (a rarity in our mountain country) under the canopy of a 300-acre stand of towering red pine. Walk a half-mile, a mile, or even two or more, by choosing a route to your liking – hiking clockwise and then reverse, or trekking around the system a number of times.With April drawing near, the sky an electric blue, and the air comfortably cool, my wife and I head to Cathedral Pines for an afternoon hike. The trailhead is at the junction of Maine Highway 27, known as the Arnold Trail in this section, and the Eustis Ridge Road. This junction is 3.6 miles north of the Highways 16/27 intersection in Stratton Village by the Dead River Historical Society museum.Cross the bridge over the South Branch of the Dead River, and pass the turnout that offers a striking view east over Flagstaff Lake to the Bigelow Range. Actually, I rarely pass this viewpoint. I almost always turn in, step out of the truck, hang here for a time, take in the bold profile of Cranberry Peak, the Horns – North and South – West Peak, and Avery Peak.In the next mile, stands of pine, red and white, line the roadside, and the south edge of Cathedral Pines appears on the left. The Eustis Ridge Road and the Cathedral Pines trailhead are on the left, across from the entrance to the Cathedral Pines Campground on the right. A metal gate marks the beginning of the Blue Trail.Red pine canopy against blue skyThink of the system as a circle with a line running up the center and extending below and above the circle. The Blue Trail is that bisecting line. We walk 50’ to a junction: Yellow Trail to the left (south); Red Trail to the right (north). The Blue Trail continues in a straight line to a point where the Yellow and Red Trails meet near the farther edge of the circle.What trail surface do we have this day? Will this be a snowshoe hike? We find the pathways to be snow-covered, packed firm, but without ice. The Stratton-Eustis Corporation, which manages this tract, grooms the trails for snowshoe and ski travel in winter, and we have the benefit of their thoughtful trail work. Today’s conditions are just right for walking in our winter hiking shoes, without sinking. Back into the truck go the snowshoes we had hauled out at first, and we are underway.At the Blue, Red, and Yellow Trails intersection we opt for the Yellow Trail, turning left, hiking clockwise. I am struck immediately by the sheer height of 80’ pines, reddish-brown bark aglow in the afternoon sun. Long, long, shadows reach across glossy white snow. My eyes run to the canopy above – a rich, dark green. I throw my head back; follow the vertical rise of a near pine, to fix on the treetops. Sighting up a single tree, my field of view becomes all canopy and blue sky behind. Quite the sight!I bring my gaze back towards earth, but hold for a time on the bark of the red pine. For a good close-up inspection of the broad scales of the bark, I remove my gloves, run my bare hand over the roughness. It is a remarkable occasion, to be up close to such a sizeable living thing, far older than I am – and far, far taller. My imagination takes me to the day when a crew of tree planters placed this one pine and its neighbors in the sandy soil as seedlings, the decades that followed, the comings and goings of farmers, people of the woods, travelers heading for Canada and back, people who once lived in the former Flagstaff Village who may have stopped here.Onward! We make our way readily over the packed surface, walking in silence, the light crunch of boots on snow, the slightest of breezes the only sound. Trail designers have been thoughtful to lay out a route that meanders ever so slightly among the pines, breaking up the line of sight, inviting pause, reflection, and not being in too much of a hurry.Our Yellow Trail arcs westward, then northward in a 0.5 mile semicircular route to reach a second, upper, junction with the Blue Trail. Here, in the heart of the stand, a sign welcomes visitor to Cathedral Pines. There are no other people in sight. We have the heart of the pine stand to ourselves.Here and there a few balsam fir poke above the snow, the exception to the vast, nearly exclusive, stand of red pine. Seed cones for the fir have likely been carried here on prevailing northwest winds, out of the nearby mixed growth forest that grows in that direction. A few of these reach to a height of 10-12’, diminutive beside the 80‘ pines.We could turn right (east) on the Blue Trail to return to the trailhead and our truck, but we wish to explore much more of the trail system. Straight ahead (north) the 0.5-mile Red Trail leads in a northern semicircle that will join the Blue Trail near the trailhead. We will take the Red Trail eventually, but choose now to head left (west) on an extension of the Blue Trail towards a backwoods bog. The trail leaves the red pine stand in 100’, enters a forest of balsam fir, white cedar, and paper birch, and nears the snow-covered wetland.Beneath our feet – well beneath, under the snow, the trail is a boardwalk. No sign of the boards on this snowbound day, but in warmer seasons, the walkway enables hikers to reach and cross the marsh – with all the viewing opportunities that offers. In summer we might expect red-winged blackbirds, and other birds that favor such a rich, edge environment, to show themselves.Today a few willows and alders, and an occasional cedar rise out of the snow, to break up what otherwise is open, snow blanketed, bog. Tracks of deer and snowshoe hare run from adjacent woods back to the bog and back. I gain a partial glimpse to the southeast of the distant Bigelow Range. The sun brightens the snow cover on the bare summit ledge of each of the multiple peaks.The Blue Trail continues across the marsh to enter woods on the far side, but we turn around here on the boardwalk section, soon reach the Cathedral Pines sign at the trail junction, and head left (north) on the Red Trail, More high pine, more quiet, more display of rich afternoon light to savor as we walk the Red semicircle to return to our starting point. On some days I reverse course, re-hiking first the Red rail, and then the Yellow to spend yet more time in this peaceful setting. We have enjoyed a fine spring walk on the distance we have covered already, and choose to call it a day.Red pine is also known as Norway pine, which contributes to the misconception that this magnificent tree is an import from Scandinavia. However, that alternate name derives from stands of red pine in Oxford County, in the vicinity of Norway, Maine. Reaching heights of 80’ with diameter ranging from 1-2 ‘, red pine is truly an impressive tree. Cathedral Pines offers Franklin County residents and visitors a readily reached setting open to the public. Many thanks to the Stratton-Eustis Development Corporation for managing Cathedral Pines, and making this fine resource available for the public to enjoy.A red pine note: Maine’s champion red pine is in Franklin County, and accessible to the public Find it in the Webb Beach unit of Mt. Blue State Park, on the short footpath between the beach and the boat launch. I snowshoed there this winter to have a look. Look for it to the right of the south-leading path, about halfway between the beach and the launch.We have in Franklin County some of the most pristine and ruggedly beautiful landscape to be found anywhere in the Eastern USA. – right in our backyard. Spring has arrived, and with it a new season of opportunities to enjoy this landscape on foot. Make your own exploring plans for the days to come. I hope to see you on trail!Text and photos copyright Doug Dunlap 2021last_img read more

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Professor speaks on political discourse

first_imgJohn Duffy, associate professor of English, spoke on the ethics of argument during “ND Votes ’16: Political Responsibility and Virtuous Discourse” at Geddes Hall on Monday night. The event was sponsored by ND Votes ’16, a nonpartisan campaign aimed at educating and registering young voters.Duffy, the director of the University Writing Program, said the “toxic rhetoric” used in contemporary political discourse has made finding truth in politics incredibly difficult.“This rhetoric has managed to undermine forces grounded in logical argument and empirical evidence, which once were considered authoritative,” Duffy said.Much of the blame for this unhealthy political atmosphere falls on the media, he said.“Cable TV, talk radio and all the other social media platforms have made toxic rhetoric a fact of everyday life, a form of entertainment and a product to be bought and sold,” he said.Duffy said the media has become unreliable in reporting the truth, which has made discerning fact from fiction a legitimate challenge.“We seem to have come to a place where we are unclear on the nature of factual information. We’re not agreed on what constitutes a fact,” he said.In order for this toxic rhetoric to end, a cultural change must occur, Duffy said, and this cultural change must be grounded in supporting statements with actual evidence.“There are assertions, assertions, assertions — but not evidence. When you provide evidence for a claim, you are demonstrating your integrity. You are not simply making wild statements, you are willing to back them up,” he said.Duffy said people must also be willing to listen to those challenging their ideas, who present opposing viewpoints.“You expose yourself to the contradictions, the uncertainties, the possibilities that attach themselves to any serious, worthwhile questions,” he said.By doing this, Duffy said, “we expose ourselves to the possibility that we might have to change our minds.”In closing, Duffy said personal arguments and opinions should be taken seriously, since they are a reflection of personal values and are “expressions of who we are, expressions of our character, expressions of the kind of community in which we want to live.”Lorraine Cuddeback, a Ph.D. candidate in theology, examined voting from a Catholic perspective. Cuddeback said developing a strong conscience is a necessity for choosing the best political candidate.“The formation of a conscience first involves a willingness to seek what the truth is,” Cuddeback said.Cuddeback said that Catholics should play an active role in the political world.“It is the particular vocation of lay Catholics to directly shape the moral character of the country,” she said.The event also offered students the opportunity to register as voters in preparation for the 2016 presidential primaries and elections and provided instructions for obtaining an absentee ballot.Tags: CSC, ND Votes ’16, Rooney Center for Ethics and Democracylast_img read more

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Office of Civil Rights opens second investigation into possible Title IX violation

first_imgThe United States Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights (OCR) is investigating the University for possible Title IX violations pertaining to two cases, according to documents obtained by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Dominique DeMoe | The Observer The more recent case was opened by the OCR on Dec. 23 and, according to the letter the OCR addressed to University President Fr. John Jenkins, “the complaint alleges that beginning in the 2015-2016 academic year, the University subjected a female undergraduate (Student A) to discrimination based on sex. The complaint raises whether the University fails to promptly and equitably respond to complaints, reports and/or incidents of sexual violence of which it had notice, including Student A’s report of [redacted], thereby creating for students a sexually hostile environment.”University spokesperson Dennis Brown confirmed Notre Dame is under investigation and the University has complied with all requests for information from the OCR.“We have provided all of the information requested by the OCR and therefore there are no OCR investigation requests currently pending with the University.” Brown said in an email. “These matters, and the information we have provided in accord with the OCR’s investigations into the individual complaints, are now being reviewed by the OCR.”Documents have not been made available for the less recent of the two cases, which was opened by the OCR on Feb. 19, 2016.  Tags: Office of Civil Rights, Title IX, Title IX investigation, Title IX violationslast_img read more

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4-H center improved

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaA rededication ceremony is planned for August 7 at the Jekyll 4-HCenter on Jekyll Island, Ga. The ceremony officially marks thecompletion of a $1.5 million renovation project at the center,which hosts more than 10,000 Georgia students each year.Operated by UGA’s College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences, the Jekyll 4-H Center is one of five 4-H centers locatedacross the state. Previously operated as a resort hotel, thecollege began leasing the hotel from the State of Georgia/JekyllIsland Authority in 1982. Students first used the facility in1983.”We realized in late February that major repairs were required,”said Arch Smith, assistant leader of the Georgia 4-H Program. “And it was time to modify the building to reflect the currentuse.”4-H campers were housed in neighboring motels during the month ofJune, so the 4-H programs at Jekyll continued withoutinterruption. With the renovations complete the center is nowopen to serve 4-Hers across the state.The rededication ceremony officially announcing the completion ofthe project is set to begin at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 7. The ceremony will be followed by a tour of the Jekyll 4-H Centerat 1 p.m.UGA President Michael Adams and UGA CAES Dean and Director GaleBuchanan will be among the day’s speakers.”We are excited about the new and improved Jekyll 4-H Center,”said Buchanan. “The renovations will allow the center tocontinue to serve students in this area of the state for summercamp, youth conferences and environmental education programs foryears to come.”last_img read more

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Mitigating risk in your vendor network

first_imgA group of hackers were recently charged with stealing not-yet-public corporate news releases that covered earnings reports, personnel changes and other material information, then traded on it to the tune of $100 million dollars in illegal proceeds. The largest crime of its kind ever prosecuted was orchestrated by a team of cybercriminals from the U.S., Ukraine and Europe.This story is a prime example of the expansion and increased sophistication of financial cybercrime, a true network effect. The hackers were opportunistic – they didn’t directly attack the affected companies, but exploited the vulnerability of the firms’ newswire partners. It is a cautionary tale for banks and financial institutions that share sensitive information with a network of vendors that includes professional service firms, regulators, and business partners.  As the risk of security breaches continues to grow, and the regulatory environment becomes more stringent, it is imperative for financial firms of all stripes to take steps to mitigate risk in their vendor networks.It is standard operating procedure for employees of banks, insurance companies and securities firms to share sensitive – often regulated – information outside their organizations. In the course of their work, they share market-moving data beyond their firewall: think about the information sent to colleagues and outside parties while working on regulatory exams, filings, compliance programs, financial crimes and other highly sensitive material. Add to that protected customer information and you have a perfect storm for an impactful data breach. Matthew L. Schwartz, a former federal prosecutor in New York, was quoted in the Associated Press coverage of the $100 million hack, saying, “The lesson in this is your information is only as secure as the people you share it with. If you share that information with a news service, a PR firm or even a law firm, then you need to make sure that it’s secure.” continue reading » 54SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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East Setauket Home Invasion, Assault Probed

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating and armed home invasion in East Setauket during which the victim was hit in the head with a gun last week, authorities said.Two masked men entered an Old Town Road home through an unlocked front door, walked into the bedroom, pointed the firearm at the victim and demanded money at 3 a.m. Sunday, March 29, police said.The assailants hit the victim in the head with the weapon before fleeing the scene with cash, police said.Police have not made any arrests nor were description of the suspects available.Sixth Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img

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