Zero Deposit signs up Foxtons and will ‘soon’ be in 3,000 branches

first_imgHome » News » Zero Deposit signs up Foxtons and will ‘soon’ be in 3,000 branches previous nextProducts & ServicesZero Deposit signs up Foxtons and will ‘soon’ be in 3,000 branchesSeven months after officially launching, insurance-backed service has now signed up several key estate agents and social landlords, and also won access to ZPG’s users.Nigel Lewis3rd October 201803,835 Views Rental deposits replacement start-up Zero Deposit has begun training up negotiators at both Your Move and Foxtons and says it will have between 2,500 and 3,000 letting agents distributing its product within a ‘few months’.The announcement was made by CEO Jon Notley (pictured, above) during an industry drinks gathering last night in central London at Knight Frank’s swanky London HQ.“The advice to agents is that if they don’t want to be at the back of the queue, better to contact us sooner rather than later as the queue is getting longer,” he said.Foxtons is the latest high-profile agent to sign up to Zero Deposit, just ahead of Your Move. Its signing-up is less of a surprise; the estate agency chain’s parent company LSL recently invested in Zero Deposit via a £750,000 convertible loan note.Representatives of the company’s other backers were also at the gathering including Connells Group Chief Executive David Plumtree and Paul Deveney from the Acorn Group, while the party’s venue was supplied by another backer, Knight Frank.Tenant take-upThe company, which was co-founded by Notley with start-up entrepreneur Ben Austin, also claims that half of all tenants offered its service take it up.Other members of the beefed-up Zero Deposits management team at the party said its service was appealing to upmarket tenants as well as those who can’t afford large deposits.Chief Operations Officer Gary Wright, who said that upmarket renters in central London facing paying deposits of £6,000 or more were warming to the idea of paying for his firm’s service, preferring to spend the money on lifestyle choices rather than a deposit.Other new members of the Zero Deposit team include its new Chief Financial Officer Andrew Doyle, who launched property portal Assertahome in 2000.knight frank Rob Sargent Jon Notley rental deposits acorn group Ben Austin connells David Plumtree zero deposit October 3, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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The budding U.S.-Russia ‘bromance’

first_imgIf Harvard hosted a panel in 1991 on U.S.-Soviet relations, it’s a good bet that the term “bromance” didn’t come up. But Scottish historian Niall Ferguson used that phrase Wednesday night, referring to the cozy relationship between Russia’s president and the U.S. president-elect, thereby showing just how drastically things have changed since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the rise of a new Russia.Moderated by Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Douglas Dillon Professor of Government at Harvard Kennedy School, the panel, called “25 Years After the Collapse of the Soviet Union: What Comes Next?,” drew a standing-room crowd to the Starr Auditorium.Allison began by screening the well-known video of the red flag coming down over the Kremlin, and then posed questions to the panelists. What went right and what went wrong in the wake of the Soviet collapse? And if we apply this history, what should happen moving forward?Ferguson, who serves on the directorial board of the Belfer Center, didn’t believe that the cozy Trump-Putin relationship is necessarily beneficial. “I don’t think that the Trump administration should effectively be pandering to the Kremlin,” he said. Noting Trump’s desire to work bilaterally with Russia, he said that leader Vladimir Putin’s “main problem would be to stop himself from visibly salivating at the prospect.”In Ferguson’s view, British leader Margaret Thatcher and U.S. President Ronald Reagan were correct in viewing the Soviet Union as an evil empire. He said that Moscow leaders Mikhail Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin and U.S. President George H.W. Bush all deserve credit for maintaining peace after the Soviet collapse.“Many people strongly believe that Putin is the villain. But there is another view, which is the one held in the Kremlin, that the deterioration of relations is in some ways the fault of the U.S.” He cited the more aggressive stance of recent Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, saying, “It was the U.S. who proposed to put antiballistic missiles between the Czech Republic and Poland, and encouraged Ukraine to become a member of NATO or the E.U. Foreign policy expert Henry Kissinger thought that was a mistake, and I’m of the view that he was right. But I don’t think the Trump administration should respond by swinging to the opposite extreme.”Mary Elise Sarotte, a visiting professor of government and history at Harvard, suggested that the answers to Allison’s questions were contained in three words: contingency, continuity, and collapse. In the first case, she said, sheer chance played a role in the fortunate turns after 1991.Panelists Niall Ferguson (from left), moderator Graham Allison, Mary Elise Sarotte, and Arne Westad, S.T. Lee Professor of U.S.-Asia Relations, spoke to a standing-room crowd. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer“It was a biological contingency that brought Gorbachev to power, as the first three choices all died. He seized the opportunity to introduce some badly needed reforms,” she recalled. “But we also owe a debt to the protesters from below, who forced the window open.”Continuity was what went wrong, as the West didn’t adapt to the new reality quickly enough. She cited the 9/11 terror attacks on the United States as a sad example, when American defense systems were still geared to a Soviet land attack. Finally, she named collapse as the word for the future, because the disintegration of the Soviet Union is ongoing. “Empires don’t collapse that quickly. And if the Soviet Union is still disintegrating before our eyes, policymakers need to understand the history.”Arne Westad, S.T. Lee Professor of U.S.-Asia Relations at Harvard Kennedy School, went further into historical context, saying that one reason the Cold War ended was economic changes in the West.“During the ’70s, very few people would have thought that the West would overtake the Soviet Union economically,” Westad said. “But the transformation that started in the late ’70s put enormous pressure on the Soviet Union to come to terms with capitalism, the fact that it seemed to be elementarily successful. There was a realization, which Gorbachev came to symbolize, that the Soviet Union could not go on as it had in the past.”Also advantageous, he said, was the ability of Reagan and George H.W. Bush to work with U.S. allies. “How difficult would the unification of Germany have been if there hadn’t been a Western alliance that actually worked?” he asked. The West’s main failure, he said, was in not building international structures where Russia could be better integrated. Allison echoed the thought that Russia has yet to be integrated into a greater international order.The upcoming Trump presidency was again invoked at the end of the talk, with Ferguson raising the issue of how Russian hackers probably played a significant role in the U.S. election. Allison concluded that he’d bet that within two years of the Trump presidency, U.S.-Russian relations will have notably improved. But then, he said, the “thing about bets is that you can be wrong.”last_img read more

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SEAL-tested, NASA-approved

first_imgJonny Kim was in the grocery store when the call came: He would have to exchange his emergency room scrubs for a space suit.“I was happy, jubilated, excited — all these emotions,” Kim said. “My wife was there. I told her and she was jumping up and down in the grocery store. So we looked silly. I was about to pay for the food.”Kim, a 2016 Harvard Medical School (HMS) graduate, was one of a dozen candidates picked by NASA in June for its next astronaut class. A year into a four-year residency at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Kim will put his medical career on hold so he can learn to fly a plane, spacewalk, operate the International Space Station’s robotic arm, and master other skills NASA considers essential.This isn’t the first time Kim has exchanged one high-pressure career for another. Before going on inactive reserve to pursue his medical training, he was a Navy SEAL with more than 100 combat missions under his belt. His military honors include a Silver Star and a Bronze Star.“Why wouldn’t NASA want him?” said David Brown, head of MGH’s Department of Emergency Medicine and MGH Trustees Professor of Emergency Medicine at HMS. “We wanted him. Harvard Medical School wanted him. Everyone wanted him.”Kim, 33, has come a long way from the shyness and small dreams of his Los Angeles youth. Buffeted by family instability and a difficult time at school, he didn’t see in himself the qualities he admired in others: the courage of the astronauts whose posters adorned his walls, the quiet professionalism and odds-defying determination of the Special Forces. As high school graduation neared, it seemed only a radical step could get him off the road to nowhere. So he enlisted in the Navy and asked to become a member of one of its elite SEAL teams. The recruiter could promise only the chance to try. For Kim that was enough.“I didn’t like the person I was growing up to become,” he said. “I needed to find myself and my identity. And for me, getting out of my comfort zone, getting away from the people I grew up with, and finding adventure, that was my odyssey, and it was the best decision I ever made.”SEAL training was just as tough as advertised, Kim said. He considered quitting during “hell week,” a five-day stretch of near continuous training in cold, wet conditions.“They let us sleep for a couple of hours in nice sleeping bags, one of only two naps you get in five days of training,” Kim said. “And when you’re snuggled up in this warm sleeping bag and they wake you up and immediately make you go in the frigid ocean, it was the closest I ever came to quitting. I had that taste of comfort, and then it was taken away from you. The cold was magnified because your body’s so broken. When you’re exercising, you can push through the pain. When you’re cold, you’re just by yourself.”Once past the initial phase, Kim had additional training that prepared him for service as a navigator, sniper, point man, and combat medic. Combat was inevitably very different from what he envisioned as a high school recruit, and Kim said he still feels a duty to close friends killed in fighting.“I don’t watch a lot of war films and documentaries anymore,” he said. “Losing a lot of good friends galvanized me and made a lot of my remaining teammates make sure we made our lives worthwhile. I still, to this day, every day, think of all the good people who didn’t get a chance to come home. I try to make up for the lives and positive [impact] they would have had if they were alive.”Kim traces his interest in becoming a doctor to a day in 2006 in Ramadi, Iraq, when he was serving as a medic and two close friends were shot. Both eventually died. Kim treated one in the field.“He had a pretty grave wound to the face,” Kim said. “It was one of the worst feelings of helplessness. There wasn’t much I could do, just make sure his bleeding wasn’t obstructing his airway, making sure he was positioned well. He needed a surgeon. He needed a physician and I did eventually get him to one, but … that feeling of helplessness was very profound for me.”The doctors and nurses who worked on his friend made a lasting impression on Kim. Three years later, in 2009, having joined a Navy program through which enlisted personnel can be commissioned as officers, he left for undergraduate studies at the University of San Diego, with the intention of ultimately going to medical school.He earned a bachelor’s degree in math in three years — the Navy required full course loads during the academic year plus summer school — and then, in 2012, arrived at Harvard Medical School.Among the people he met early in his HMS career was Assistant Professor of Neurobiology David Cardozo, associate dean for basic graduate studies, who served in the Royal Canadian Navy and acts as an informal mentor for veterans on campus. The Medical School’s community of veterans is small, numbering about 20 at any one time. Students with special operations backgrounds are even fewer. Though Kim was one of the School’s most decorated veterans, Cardozo was struck by how modest he was.“He’s the steadiest person you could imagine,” Cardozo said. “He’s very gifted and he has a depth of character that’s unequaled. He did wonderfully here.”During his third year at HMS, Kim entered a mentoring program and met Brown, who heads the hospital’s Emergency Department. After graduating, Kim decided to specialize in emergency medicine and joined the Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency, a cooperative program between MGH and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.Kim wasn’t expecting to go to astronaut school — not yet, at least. He joined more than 18,000 other applicants for the NASA class — recruited every four years — as a first step, hoping to improve his chances in the next selection process, once his medical training was complete.“So we were all surprised and thrilled when he was selected, but not really all that surprised,” Brown said. “He’s just a remarkable young man … incredibly committed, absolutely unafraid.”Kim said he’s ready for whatever NASA asks. Due in Houston in late August, he recently left the residency program to prepare for the move with his wife and children.“I’m going to be a student at the bottom of another totem pole trying to learn as much information as possible,” he said. “I’m excited for the adventure. I think it’ll be another occupation where I say, ‘I can’t believe I’m getting paid for doing this.’”last_img read more

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Air Force ROTC to host 32nd Annual Flyin’ Irish Basketball Tournament

first_imgObserver File Photo Students compete in the annual Flyin’ Irish Basketball Tournament last year. The event is the largest ROTC sporting event in the country and will include over 800 ROTC members from across the country.The tournament will begin Friday, with the finals held Sunday. Early games will take place primarily in the Joyce Center Fieldhouse, while the championship game and three-point competition will be held in Purcell Pavilion. The championship will also be live-streamed for the first time this year, Notre Dame junior Natalie Petro said. An Air Force ROTC member, Petro was responsible for coordinating the tournament this year.Kernan — who will be participating in the tournament for the first time — said she is excited to see ROTC cadets from schools from all over the country and meet new members as well.“I’m looking forward to seeing everyone from around the country,” she said. “It will also be really cool because I have friends from the University of Dayton who will be coming.” Petro also said one of the best things about the tournament is the opportunity to make new connections. The event has grown significantly over the years, she said, and it is easy to find people who know about the event.“It’s fun when you go to field training [with members of other ROTC programs], you get to appreciate it,” Petro said. “On the second day I mentioned the Flyin’ Irish Basketball Tournament, and two people had heard of it.” While the environment is friendly for the most part, it can get competitive at times, which Kernan said is likely due to the nature of multiple ROTC programs coming together.With the tournament taking place in the middle of the Notre Dame basketball season, it can be difficult to find time for so many teams to play, Petro said.“We try to schedule the tournament around the basketball program so that we can get enough courts,” she said.Both a men’s and a women’s team are crowned as champions at the end of the tournament. Last year’s winners included the Texas A&M Tri-Military in the men‘s bracket and the Marquette Golden Eagles Army ROTC in the women’s bracket, but both Kernan and Petro said they are confident in Notre Dame’s chances at this year’s tournament. While Notre Dame has multiple teams participating from all three military ROTC branches, Kernan said a group of cadets known as “the scrappers” are particularly hopeful this year.“Scrappers are the players that are not on the ‘real’ [Air Force ROTC] team,” she said. “They’re mostly miscellaneous people, but they are great athletes.” Kernan, who is on one of the scrapper teams, saidBoth Kernan and Petro are members of scrapper teams, and Petro said she is confident in her team’s ability to dominate the tournament.“We’re going do great, of course,” she said. “We’re going to win the whole thing.” Tags: Air Force ROTC, basketball, Flyin’ Irish Basketball Tournament, ROTC The Notre Dame Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Core (ROTC) will host 56 teams and more than 800 students for the 32nd annual Flyin’ Irish Invitational Basketball Tournament this weekend. The competition has grown to become the largest ROTC sporting event in the country, Saint Mary’s sophomore and Air Force ROTC cadet Marta Kernan said. “It started out as a group of [ROTC members] trying to get together and have fun, but more people just kept joining and joining,” she said.last_img read more

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Honduran President Launches “Operation Lightning” against Crime

first_imgBy Dialogo October 28, 2011 On October 26, Honduran President Porfirio Lobo launched “Operation Lightning” to counter the rising wave of violence in the country with greater police deployment. “We have to go in with deterrence (…) and I’m going to hire many more police officers, and many more soldiers as well; that has been decided,” Lobo announced at an event at the city hall of San Pedro Sula, 240 km north of the capital. “I’m not satisfied (with the work of the police authorities), and I’m taking on the task of keeping faith with my people in giving them security,” he promised. The crimes committed against two young people – one of them the 22-year-old son of the rector of the National Autonomous University of Honduras, Julieta Castellanos – whose corpses appeared on the side of a road on October 22, raised the level of alert due to the wave of homicides in Honduras even higher. The press, which has extensively covered the two crimes and the violence in general, called on the government to punish those responsible. Operation Lightning entails reinforcement of the patrols conducted by police officers in the country’s major cities, Lobo said. Coinciding with Lobo’s announcement, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) warned in a statement that “the phenomenon of violence and insecurity has become a serious problem affecting Honduran society.” “In a society where violence claims 20 victims a day, 47 percent of whom are young people aged between 15 and 29, young people as a group feel themselves severely threatened by insecurity and crime, making it necessary to seek and implement concrete solutions immediately,” the statement stressed. Honduras is the country with the highest homicide rate in the world, 82.1, followed in the Central American region by El Salvador with 66 and Guatemala with 41.4, according to a 2011 worldwide study by the UN that considered 207 countries.last_img read more

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Deodorant, Dadaism, and Betty White: Inside the carnival of millennial humor

first_imgRemember when deodorant ads were just boring background noise between episodes of Seinfeld?Now, thanks to Old Spice and similar companies following in their footsteps, a new scent to mask body odor is one of the most engaging parts of TV—and it’s all thanks to a shift in generational humor.To many internet-engrossed millennials, nihilistic and off-kilter wisecracks are comedy gold. This surprising trend has received plenty of attention from some of the world’s most trusted news sources: both The Washington Post and The Guardian have published in-depth articles investigating exactly what’s going on with this phenomenon. Some boil it down to a reincarnated, more accessible type of Dadaism, but on a deeper level there’s another mechanism at play: this development demonstrates a keen understanding of how hard it is to keep pace with a perpetually shifting society.A common thread in millennial-generated humor is personal finance—and for good reason. According to a Northwestern Mutual study from late 2019, the average amount of debt for people born between 1980 and 2000 is almost $28,000, most of it coming from credit cards and student loans. With friends and siblings swimming in debt, this age group finds jokes about financial stress all too relatable. This doesn’t mean millennials are hopeless—in fact, the opposite rings true. In spite of financial pressure, people in this demographic have found a way to make one another laugh in a way tailored to their concerns. Where there’s laughter, there’s community. And, where there’s community, there’s resilience.So, what exactly does this mean for credit unions? Don’t worry, you won’t have to photoshop a 20-piece box of Chicken McNuggets onto a Baby Yoda screenshot for your mobile ads. You just need to put your financial expertise to good use.Fighting Stress with WisdomThe influx of deadpan jokes about bills, debt, and finance is more than an indication of the stress this generation faces—it also points to a need for guidance from local experts. According to the latest PACE Consumer Report, both younger and older millennials need help from authorities on the ins and outs of finance.When it comes to “younger” millennials (people aged 20-30):75% were referred to their primary banking source from a family member or friendOnly 8% have a financial advisorExpect the largest number of life events (4) within the next 2-3 years compared to all other age groupsWhen it comes to “older” millennials (people aged 30-40):69% are worried about retirement and investment planningAverage 22 mobile bank interactions per month (the most out of any age group)Express the most interest in information to help make financial decisions compared to other age groupsA group of people looking for advice? And another group hungry for knowledge? Credit unions are the perfect authority to help!Wisdom in ActionSome credit unions have recognized this demand to their—and their members’—benefit. After all, a lack of financial literacy isn’t something that can be patched over with whatever appears on the first page of a Google search. Relevant information can vary from state to state, and even from town to town. So, local expertise, something credit unions have in spades, is an invaluable resource for this workforce sector. If each credit union is different, so are the needs of its members. Meeting the demands of locals is a crucial component to what sets credit unions apart from for-profit financial institutions. When it comes to educational resources, you can pick and choose what works best for your targeted audience. While in-person classes have a personal, engaging touch, there are other ways to connect with a digitally fluent generation looking for financial guidance. From podcasts to live e-seminars to Reddit AMAs, there are countless ways to share valuable information with the generation most likely to sleep next to their smart phone.Digital education isn’t the only way to connect to millennials. If you prefer a more personal approach, all you need to do is keep the grassroots history of credit unions in mind. People in this demographic are all about catalyzing change at a peer-to-peer level. After all, it was millennials who revitalized Betty White’s career with a frivolous Facebook group 10 years ago. As a generation who prioritizes shopping local and mindful corporate practices, millennials are all about the little things. Actions as simple as strengthening small business relationships and promoting greener banking policies can nudge this formidable demographic to come to your credit union for guidance.With more ways than ever to provide guidance to financially preoccupied millennials, credit unions are in a prime spot to do what they do best: provide thoughtful solutions to everyday problems. So, slap on some Old Spice, roll up your sleeves, and get to work. More than any other type of institution, credit unions know that when people come together great things happen. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Ben Prager Prior to forming Prager Creative, Ben worked with design studios, branding firms and advertising agencies to push great strategy and design for all his projects. His experience with all aspects … Web: www.pragercreative.com/creditunions Detailslast_img read more

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CNY Firemen’s Association Convention, set to be held in Owego, postponed

first_imgOWEGO (WBNG) — Another event set to take place this summer has been postponed due to the coronavirus. “An awful head start for it, really. You just have to contact people and make sure they’re going to show up again next year, simple as that,” said Bidwell. Not only does the convention hit close to home with Owego’s history, but it also brings a lot of people into town. On the bright side, it’s not canceled, just postponed, giving organizers a leg-up on planning for next year. “If this coronavirus ever gets over with, we’ll get back to what we’re supposed to do, simple as that,” said Bidwell. It holds a special meaning for the village of Owego. The association represents fire departments throughout 20 counties in the state and the convention brings them together for meetings, hose races, parades and celebrations. But now Owego will have to wait until 2021 to host. “It brings a lot of business into the village for a whole weekend, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday,” said convention co-chair and former Owego Fire Chief Ed Bidwell. “It allows businesses to pick up additional business that weekend. It’s really worth it.” The Central New York Firemen’s Association convention was planned for July 9 through 12 in Owego. The association’s first president was former Owego Fire Chief Frank Baker, who also donated the recently restored fireman’s fountain in memory of his son. The last time Owego hosted the CNY Firemen’s Association convention was 2010. The new date is set for July 8 through 11, 2021.last_img read more

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PP Papuk is moving into new investments with money from EU funds

first_imgIn the Papuk Nature Park, the preparation of a new project proposal for the upcoming cross-border cooperation program Interreg VA Hungary-Croatia continues. Organized by the Consul General of the Republic of Croatia in Pécs, Mrs. Vesna Haluga, a meeting of representatives of the two parks was held with the aim of continuing the partnership started with the successfully implemented project “Two rivers and one mountain”.The director of the Papuk Nature Park, Alen Jurenac and Goran Radonić, the expert manager of the Public Institution, talked with the representatives of the Danube Drava National Park, led by the director Mr. Szabolc Závoczky, about improving the tourist infrastructure through cross-border cooperation.The project proposal in which the leading partner will be the Papuk Nature Park will include several infrastructure investments in the Croatian and Hungarian border areas.The most frequent point of the Park that gained the status of a UNESCO-protected geopark in 2015, the Jankovac picnic area, which also houses the Eco Point of the Public Institution due to the exceptional popularity and attractiveness of the content and personal cars. There is only one road leading to Jankovac from the direction of Virovitica-Podravina County, which will be reconstructed during the 14-month period of the UNESCO Geopark Geopark project, starting in 2018, the Papuk Nature Park points out, adding that period traffic will take place regularly with occasional adjustments to the ride, of which visitors will be notified in a timely manner.Also, the Public Institution has determined the relative traffic load in the area of ​​the Jankovac Forest Park and creating traffic jams, and the available parking space is currently being arranged with the aim of better organization of vehicle reception at the picnic area, but there is a need for strategic and sustainable management of visitors. vehicles. “The growing interest of visitors to explore the protected area by direct movement in space motivates the employees of the Institution to plan the tracing and marking of routes through the forest area from Slatinski Drenovac to Jankovac. By arranging the area for the reception of a larger number of vehicles outside the Jankovac Forest Park, more precisely in Slatinski Drenovac, the parking space of the picnic area will be relieved. ” points out the director of the Papuk Nature Park, Alen Jurenac. Due to the tendency to expand the content for visitors, there is a need to establish an additional multi-purpose facility in Slatinski Drenovac in the immediate vicinity of the access road for the mentioned picnic area. This facility, which is recently owned by the Nature Park, is located in an attractive location, and will be converted into a multi-purpose Visitor Center as an info point where visitors will be able to get basic information about the Park, and, among other numerous facilities and services , rent a bike and set off on a network of marked routes to explore the natural beauty of Papuk.By the way, in 2015, Papuk ‘Nature Park was included in the list of geoparks under UNESCO protection as the first and so far the only park in Croatia of exceptional geological importance.Related news:PAPUK RECEIVES FIRST ACCOMMODATION CAPACITIES, DUBOKA CAMP-REST OPENEDlast_img read more

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£15m Hampstead mansion sign of better times

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Platte River Bank Repair Contract Awarded

first_imgImage source: USACEThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District awarded a $1.68 million construction contract to Midwest Construction Company, Inc., on January 3 for the repair of approximately 300 feet of the right bank of the Platte River, approximately 1.25 river miles from the confluence of the Platte and the Missouri River.At this location, the entire depth of riverbank has washed away, thereby allowing significant volumes of water to prematurely exit the channel and begin to establish a new path to the Missouri River south of its historic path, said USACE.“The intent of this repair is to restore a single, reliable confluence for the Platte and Missouri Rivers that can efficiently merge flows from both systems and to retain its self-clearing ability to avoid adverse impacts to the Missouri River navigation channel,” said Dave Sobczyk, USACE Operations Project Manager for the Omaha-District Missouri River Project Office.The bank will be reconstructed to match its pre-flood elevations and although not intended to provide flood protection, large rock is being incorporated in the repair to prevent the bank from washing out again during submergence from future flood events.According to USACE, the terms of the contact require that initial bank closure be complete in mid-February 2020, and the remainder of the repair substantially complete in early March 2020.last_img read more

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