International Centre brings new harmony

A lounge in the International Centre provides a meeting place for international students.Staff in the various units that serve international students are seeing more of each other these days. And students are having an easier time finding them.This is thanks to the new International Centre, a three-storey building that opened its doors last month.While the offices of International Services, International Market Development, ESL Services and others used to be scattered throughout the main campus – many with offices in the Decew Residence – the departments have new digs with more space and contact with the students they serve.The building includes a dozen seminar rooms, lounges for faculty and staff and a bright and spacious international students’ lounge. Offices for Brock International, International Services, ESL Services and International Market Development are located on the second floor. The third floor includes offices for the Department of Classics, an archeology workroom and a Cypriot museum.The new building allows staff members who work on behalf of international students to meet more of them face to face, said Sheila Young, director of Brock International.“It’s such a pleasure to see how well used the international lounge is,” said Young, whose office looks out on the space. “If you come here between classes or at meal times, you’ll see how busy it is.”With the new building, “international students have a place,” said Jackie Sanders, associate director of ESL Services. “They feel the university respects them. And all the international offices really benefit. We can all work much more closely together. This really does give us an international presence.”Work began last March with a ground-breaking ceremony for the Norman Road project. The International Centre is 46,000 square feet, located east of 573 Glenridge Avenue and west of Quarryview Residence. The project is part of the Campaign for a Bold New Brock. An official opening ceremony is expected in the fall.The space means Brock’s international offices can do more of what they’ve been doing for years — serving students, said John Kaethler, director of International Services.“We have more extra space than we did before, and that will help us be of service to international students as well as Canadian students,” he said. “It’s a lovely building and we look forward to being of more service.” read more

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New paper outlines better method to locate magmatic copper deposits

first_imgA geologist at the University of Exeter has developed “a new and relatively inexpensive way to establish whether certain types of magmatic rocks are more likely to contain valuable metal deposits.” In a study published in Nature Geoscience, Dr Ben Williamson, of the University’s Camborne School of Mines, together with Dr Richard Herrington from the Natural History Museum, London, have proposed a new method to explore for porphyry-type copper deposits. These deposits provide around 75% of the world’s copper and a significant amount of molybdenum and gold which makes them extremely important to the world economy.The deposits, which originally form at several kilometres depth below the Earth’s surface, above large magma chambers, are relatively rare, particularly the largest deposits which are most economic to mine. In addition, most near-surface deposits have already been discovered. Any new method to locate deeper deposits is therefore of great interest to the mining industry. The project, funded by Anglo American, compared the chemical compositions of minerals from magmatic rocks that host porphyry deposits against those which are barren.A case study was then undertaken of a major new porphyry discovery in Chile, to test their theory. Minerals from magmatic rocks which host porphyry deposits have distinctive chemical characteristics which can be used as one of a suite of indicators to home-in on porphyry deposits. Unravelling the causes of the distinctive chemical signatures has also brought new insights into the formation of porphyry copper deposits, and more generally the generation of the magmatic rocks from which they form, which are an important component of the Earth’s crust. The main finding in this regard is that the magma chamber below the porphyry undergoes discrete injections of water-rich melts or watery fluids which enhance the magma’s ability to transfer copper and other metals upwards to form a porphyry copper deposit.Williamson said: “This new method will add to the range of tools available to exploration companies to discover new porphyry copper deposits. Our findings also provide important insights into why some magmas are more likely to produce porphyry copper deposits than others, and add to our understanding of how their parent magmatic rocks evolve.” The paper, entitled Porphyry copper enrichment linked to excess aluminium in plagioclase by BJ Williamson, RJ Herrington and A Morris, was published in Nature Geoscience on February 1.last_img read more

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