An Evening of Science Fiction

first_imgThe Nova Scotia Film Development Corporation and Empire Theatres are hosting a free screening of the science fiction documentaries Best Evidence and Famous Monster on Wednesday, May 30, at 7 p.m. at the Oxford Theatre. Best Evidence, produced by Halifax’s Paul Kimball, features some of the world’s leading UFO experts, including Stanton Friedman, Dr. Bruce Maccabee, Nick Pope, and Mac Tonnies. The film includes a number of very credible military witnesses discussing the cases that the debunkers never want to talk about. Stanton Freidman and Mr. Kimball will be on hand before and after the screening to answer audience questions. Famous Monster, produced by Halifax’s Michael MacDonald, looks at the life of science fiction legend Forrest J. Ackerman, the man who coined the phrase “sci-fi”, and his influence on the genre. The film features interviews with many sci-fi experts, including Ray Bradbury, Roger Corman, Joe Dante, and Mr. Ackerman himself. Mr. MacDonald will be at the screening to answer audience questions. Presented by the film development corporation and Empire Theatres, screening nights are held four times a year. The screenings allow local audiences to see homegrown film productions and help local filmmakers promote their work.last_img read more

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Bleak outlook in Houston could provide insight into what hurdles are ahead

Houston, Texas Wikimedia Commons by Crystal Laderas Posted Feb 8, 2016 8:12 am MDT A look at what’s happening in the Gulf Coast energy sector could be a window into what’s ahead for Alberta’s struggling economy.The city of Houston is seeing two sides to the economic downturn, with the white collar west feeling the pinch of the price of oil, while its east side reaps the benefits of the petrochemical sector.Dr. Bill Gilmer, the director of regional forecasting for the University of Houston says the NDP’s new program to finance petrochemical plants will help boost the economy, but it’s late in the petrochemical game.If you look at what’s happening in Houston, thousands of layoffs in the oil and gas sector are just temporarily being offset by hiring to build petrochemical facilities.“Twenty five hundred to 3,000 construction workers on site at the peak moment of construction, but then as you look at the long term employment, there might be one hundred jobs at the plant,” he said.Last week, the NDP said its Petrochemicals Diversification Program would create 3,000 jobs during construction of plants and 1,000 more once plants begin operations.Much like Houston, Calgary has already seen a large share of cuts within major oil companies.Dr. Gilmer says the stain of the falling price of oil is spilling onto to businesses in Houston that feed off the energy sector.He says retail and commercial businesses are closing and struggling to keep the lights on, and in a few months contractors will be out of work.He also points to Houston’s struggling housing sector, which continued to build luxury homes as it expected executives and high salary engineers to keep spending money. Bleak outlook in Houston could provide insight into what hurdles are ahead for Calgary AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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