91 of Moroccan Brains Flee for Western Countries 74 Wish to

By Ahlam Ben SagaRabat – How to win back Moroccan brains? A recent study by Moroccan job portal ReKrute reveals how the brain drain phenomenon affects Morocco.According to ReKrute, 91 percent of Moroccan professionals aged 35 and below as tempted to work abroad, in search of better work conditions and quality of life, which includes health care and comfort. The study suggests that motivations vary on an individual basis, as many Moroccan companies fall short of employee expectations and do not put strong efforts into winning back the qualified people who have left for other countries.Young, well-trained Moroccan individuals set their sights on western countries, such as Canada, which attracts 37 percent of Moroccan professionals, making it the hottest destination, not only for Moroccans but for many citizens of the world, ReKrute emphasized.While thousands of high-qualified Moroccans look forward to emigrating to developed countries, 74 percent of Moroccans have already spent several years in foreign countries hope to go back to Morocco to put their talents and expertise to use in the kingdom. However, even these Moroccans hesitate before returning home, due to the unstable or less-stimulating work atmospheres.It is worth mentioning that a previous report issued by Moroccan outlet Medias24, indicates that Moroccan physicians and doctors, in particular, experience tough working conditions domestically–underpaid and under-equipped–which prompts them to emigrate.“After ten years of study, we are sent to faraway regions for miserable salaries and deplorable working conditions,” one Moroccan doctor stated. Facing such prospects, Moroccan medical professionals are increasingly choosing to remain abroad, rather than address the nation’s dire need for medical services. read more

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EPA rejects unnecessary duplicative financial assurance requirements on US mining industry

first_imgThe National Mining Association (NMA) has welcomed the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) decision that new, duplicative financial responsibility requirements for the hard rock mining industry are unnecessary. The decision stems from environmental group litigation seeking to use the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund Law) to impose additional, crippling financial and regulatory burdens on the mining industry.“When litigation is used as a tool to attempt to force the government into unnecessary action against an industry, the result is bad policy,” said Hal Quinn, NMA President and CEO. “Today’s action shows that reason can prevail. Modern, advanced mining practices – coupled with existing state and federal environmental and financial assurance requirements – comprehensively cover the same risks contemplated under the CERCLA program.“At a time when America is completely import-dependent for many key minerals, we should be supporting domestic mining and encouraging investment in the U.S. to lessen our dependence on foreign supply chains,” added Quinn.Congress enacted CERCLA in 1980 to address threats to human health and the environment posed by the nation’s past waste disposal practices. CERCLA is both a backward- and forward-looking statute, intended to address remediation of existing sites and prevent the creation of new ones. In the decades that followed its enactment, state and federal environmental and financial assurance programs were developed and implemented to address the very same risks contemplated by CERCLA’s financial responsibility provisions.In 2009, several environmental groups sued the EPA, attempting to use CERCLA to subject classes of facilities within the hard rock mining industry to additional financial responsibility requirements. As a result, EPA conducted a rulemaking to determine if new requirements were needed.In 2016, EPA released a proposal premised on a faulty picture of the mining industry – it relied on legacy practices used at operations decades and even generations ago that are not representative of today’s mining and mineral processing industry. In sum: the proposal addressed conditions that no longer exist or are already remedied under other comprehensive regulatory programs. Now, the EPA has acknowledged these fundamental flaws in the proposal and rightly determined that a new financial responsibility program was not needed.EPA’s decision not to impose additional requirements on the mining and minerals industry is consistent with the ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which stated that, while EPA had to act by December 1, 2017 (the deadline established in the litigation), the final action could be no rule at all:“[T]he proposed joint order ‘does not require EPA to promulgate a new, stricter rule. At most, it ‘merely requires that EPA conduct a rulemaking and then decide whether to promulgate a new rule – the content of which is not in any way dictated by the [proposed order on consent] – using a specific timeline.” In re Idaho Conservation League, 811 F.3d 502, 524 (D.C. Cir. 2016).last_img read more

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