Danish leader speaks with Trump after Greenland dispute

COPENHAGEN — Denmark’s prime minister has had a phone conversation with U.S. President Donald Trump, who earlier this week scrapped a visit to the country by saying Mette Frederiksen was “nasty” when she rejected his idea of buying Greenland as an absurdity.The prime minister’s office said Friday that the two spoke late Thursday, and Danish media reported that the call was “constructive.”Frederiksen’s office says details of the discussion won’t be released.It is believed that it was first time the two spoke since Frederiksen, who repeatedly has said the U.S. remains one of Denmark’s close allies, took office June 27.Trump cancelled a Sept. 2-3 trip to Denmark as part of a European tour.The Associated Press

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Canadian regulators seek more leeway for boards battling hostile takeovers

TORONTO – Provincial security regulators are proposing a new set of rules for corporate Canada that would allow so-called poison pills aimed at preventing hostile takeovers to remain in place as long as they are supported by a majority of shareholders.Under current rules, regulators generally suspend a shareholder rights plan after a limited time.However, the Canadian Securities Administrators, the body representing regulators in the provinces and territories, said the changes would mean that regulators wouldn’t intervene except under extraordinary circumstances.The CSA said Thursday that the new proposed rules would allow a rights plan adopted by the board of a company to remain in place provided majority shareholder approval was obtained within a specified time.Shareholders would also be able to terminate a plan at any time with a majority vote.A typical shareholder rights plan gives a company’s board the ability to issue additional stock, usually at a cheap price and with conditions that make a hostile takeover too expensive or financially poisonous.The plans are generally intended to give boards enough time to find another deal to compete with the hostile bid, rather than stop a takeover completely.“The CSA believe that the proposed rule will modernize, harmonize and codify an appropriate regulatory approach to rights plans in Canada,” said Bill Rice, chairman of the Alberta Securities Commission and the CSA.“Barring exceptional circumstances, the decision to adopt and maintain a rights plan would be a matter for company boards and shareholders, not securities regulators.”Meanwhile, Quebec’s securities regulator has also proposed an alternative plan that would give a company’s board more power to defend against hostile takeovers.In a consultation paper of its own, the Autorite des marches financiers said “appropriate deference should be given to directors of target corporations in the exercise of their fiduciary duty.”Regulators or the courts could be called in if the directors were not living up to their obligations under the Quebec plan. by The Canadian Press Posted Mar 14, 2013 12:02 pm MDT Canadian regulators seek more leeway for boards battling hostile takeovers AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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International Centre brings new harmony

A lounge in the International Centre provides a meeting place for international students.Staff in the various units that serve international students are seeing more of each other these days. And students are having an easier time finding them.This is thanks to the new International Centre, a three-storey building that opened its doors last month.While the offices of International Services, International Market Development, ESL Services and others used to be scattered throughout the main campus – many with offices in the Decew Residence – the departments have new digs with more space and contact with the students they serve.The building includes a dozen seminar rooms, lounges for faculty and staff and a bright and spacious international students’ lounge. Offices for Brock International, International Services, ESL Services and International Market Development are located on the second floor. The third floor includes offices for the Department of Classics, an archeology workroom and a Cypriot museum.The new building allows staff members who work on behalf of international students to meet more of them face to face, said Sheila Young, director of Brock International.“It’s such a pleasure to see how well used the international lounge is,” said Young, whose office looks out on the space. “If you come here between classes or at meal times, you’ll see how busy it is.”With the new building, “international students have a place,” said Jackie Sanders, associate director of ESL Services. “They feel the university respects them. And all the international offices really benefit. We can all work much more closely together. This really does give us an international presence.”Work began last March with a ground-breaking ceremony for the Norman Road project. The International Centre is 46,000 square feet, located east of 573 Glenridge Avenue and west of Quarryview Residence. The project is part of the Campaign for a Bold New Brock. An official opening ceremony is expected in the fall.The space means Brock’s international offices can do more of what they’ve been doing for years — serving students, said John Kaethler, director of International Services.“We have more extra space than we did before, and that will help us be of service to international students as well as Canadian students,” he said. “It’s a lovely building and we look forward to being of more service.” read more

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