Celebrando Nuestra Cultura/Celebrating Our Culture at All Saints Church

first_img First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Subscribe EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Top of the News More Cool Stuff HerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Dark Side Of Beauty Salons Not Many People Know AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Signs You Want To Stay With Your Girlfriend ForeverHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeauty Make a commentcenter_img Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday 12 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Business News Cultural Heritage Celebrando Nuestra Cultura/Celebrating Our Culture at All Saints Church Article and Photo courtesy of ALL SAINTS CHURCH, PASADENA Published on Wednesday, October 2, 2013 | 4:08 pm Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy To honor the diversity of All Saints Church’s Latino / Hispanic parishioners and the Pasadena community at Large, The Latino/Hispanic Ministry invites everyone to a festive afternoon as they celebrate Latin American roots and traditions on Saturday, October 12, 4:00-7:00 p.m., in Sweetland Hall and on the Church Grounds.The date Columbus arrived in the Americas is recognized in many countries in Latin America. The most common name for the celebration in Spanish (including in some Latin American communities in the United States) is the Día de la Raza (“day of the race” or “day of the [Hispanic] people”), commemorating the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans. The day was first celebrated in Argentina in 1917, Venezuela and Colombia in 1921, Chile in 1922, and Mexico in 1928. The day was also celebrated under this title in Spain until 1957, when it was changed to the Día de la Hispanidad (“Hispanity Day”), and in Venezuela until 2002, when it was changed to the Día de la Resistencia Indígena (Day of Indigenous Resistance).Actual observance of the arrival of Christopher Columbus to the Americas varies in different parts of the United States, ranging from large-scale parades and alternative events reclaiming the indigenous and African roots of the Americas to complete non-observance.Come and join to celebrate the diversity of Pasadena’s Latino / Hispanic culture with music, food, folkloric dance, family activities, and a community resource fair. For more information contact Norma Sigmund at (626) 583-2734 or [email protected] All Saints Church is at 132 N. Euclid Avenue, Pasadena (directly across Euclid from Pasadena City Hall) or visit www.allsaints-pas.org. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Read More →

Vermont business leaders support early childhood investments

first_imgTough economic times require business and government leaders to rethink public policy and not only change the ways in which we deliver public services, but to build capacity for future success. According to Bill Stritzler, Managing Partner with Smugglers’ Notch Resort, and chair of the Vermont Business Roundtable, “Investments in education should be our first economic development strategy.”In recognition that education transformation must begin with a strong foundation of high quality early learning experiences, Lisa Ventriss, President of the Vermont Business Roundtable (Roundtable), announced today a new partnership, Pre-K Vermont, between a coalition of early education advocates and her organization. “If we are to meaningfully address the escalating costs of our correctional and social welfare programs, and improve educational outcomes, we need to improve our investments in younger children. Early education helps children enter school ready to learn and makes them ten times less likely to be retained in first grade. Controlling costs in public education, while avoiding the stigma that children take with them after being held back, is very important.”The Vermont Business Roundtable has long been recognized as a leader in public policy development for an array of issues from education to the environment. The organization’s efforts contributed to the passage of Act 62 in 2007, which allows towns to invest in early learning programs.The new partnership announced today will be funded through a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Partnership for America’s Economic Success and Pre-K Now. The Roundtable will become the new sponsor of Pre-K Vermont, an organization dedicated to increasing access and quality to high quality pre-k programs statewide, with members from business, advocacy, public education, and higher education.The partnership will develop public policy recommendations regarding early childhood investments and share these with public leaders.Act 62 Background:This year a pre-k enrollment cap will be removed for towns with schools deemed to be “underperforming”.Act 62 was signed into law on June 1, 2007. It received strong support from parents and educators, the Vermont Business Roundtable and other business leaders, law enforcement, leaders in education and medicine, along with community leaders across the state.Under the legislation, pre-k programs meeting specified quality standards will be allowed funding for 10 hours per week, if local school districts approve. Programs are capped to allow roughly half of the three and four year olds, or all of the four year olds in each district, but districts can also choose to fund all children.The bill was passed as a result of a legislative study performed by the Pre-K Study Committee, which included review of four decades of research and testimony from dozens of experts from inside and outside of Vermont.Both public and private providers will be qualified to receive funding, but no school district is required to offer pre-k programs. The pre-k program is also voluntary for families. Members of Pre-K Vermont include representatives from Vermont Business Roundtable, Kids are Priority One, University of Vermont, Vermont Superintendents Association, Head Start, Building Bright Futures, Vermont School Boards Association, private providers, and Northern Lights Career Development Center.The Roundtable is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization of 100 CEOs of Vermont’s top private and nonprofit employers, representing geographic diversity and all major sectors of the Vermont economy. The Roundtable is committed to sustaining a sound economy and preserving Vermont’s unique quality of life by studying and making recommendations on statewide public policy issue to benefit all Vermonters.Source: VBR. 5.14.2010# # #.last_img read more

Read More →

Wyoming board votes to tighten self-bonding reclamation rules for coal companies

first_imgWyoming board votes to tighten self-bonding reclamation rules for coal companies FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Wyoming Public Media:Wyoming’s Environmental Quality Council, an independent board within the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), has approved updates to how companies guarantee reclamation costs. If signed by the Governor, the decision would limit mining companies’ access to self-bonding— essentially an IOU to pay reclamation costs, rather than a financial guarantee.Bob LeResche, vice chair of the Powder River Basin Resource Council, said it’s a risky method. Its weaknesses were amplified when three major coal companies went bankrupt several years ago, with reclamation payments at risk. LeResche said the modernized rules, if passed, will help ensure land from coal mines actually gets returned to their original state.“I think it certainly protects the taxpayers against the increasing potential that reclamation might not be funded sometime in the future,” LeResche said, adding Wyoming now has the strongest self-bonding rules in the country.DEQ’s Keith Guille said proposed regulations use a new method to determine financial health so a struggling company doesn’t end up too self-bonded. “Now, what we went to is to credit ratings, and so credit ratings will now give us an idea of where they stand in their financials to be able to do that test and whether or not they can qualify for a self-bond,” Guille said.DEQ’s Land Quality Division has been in the process of updating the regulations since 2015. Its administrator, Kyle Wendtland, said in a statement the changes would ultimately reduce reclamation liability risk. It could take up to two and a half months for the Governor to consider the updates.More: EQC approves revised self-bonding rules to reduce risklast_img read more

Read More →

Chilean Navy is Negotiating Acquisition of 12 AAV-7 Amphibious Vehicles

first_img The Chilean Marines are negotiating the acquisition of 12 AAV-7 tracked armored amphibious vehicles from U.S. Marine surplus stocks. This potential acquisition is part of the expansion of capabilities associated with the recent incorporation of the amphibious assault ship Sargento Aldea, acquired from the French Navy. The LVTP-7 Amphibious Assault Vehicle, a spacious 29.1-ton vehicle constructed on a base of welded aluminum plates, began production in the early 1970s and quickly became the Marines’ standard amphibious platform. In the late 1970s (or early 1980s, according to other sources), a program to extend the vehicle’s life was contracted, including modifications that created a configuration subsequently known as the AAV-7, with a more robust motor (Cummins VT-400 Diesel) and transmission (NavseaHS-400-3A1) and a new weapons station (Cadillac Gage) with a .50-caliber machine gun and an Mk-19 40-mm grenade launcher, powered by electric motors instead of the potentially dangerous hydraulic system previously used, as well as simplifying the maintenance procedures, among others. The increase in weight was not followed by modifying the vehicle’s suspension, an obvious oversight that was subsequently corrected in an undetermined number of vehicles. The vehicle’s large, completely watertight interior compartment enables it to transport up to 25 soldiers with all their gear, in addition to the three-person crew: driver, commander, and gunner. The soldiers exit via a wide rear ramp. Three versions of this vehicle exist: the AAVP-7A1 for transport; the AAVC-7A1, which has an entire set of communications equipment, for command and control; and the AAVR-7A1 for recovery. According to unofficial reports, the Chilean Navy is believed to be considering the acquisition of 10 transport units, one command unit, and one recovery unit. An extra armor kit also exists, the installation of which requires the further installation of another kit that ensures the vehicle’s stability at sea. The AAV-7A1 is capable of speeds of up to 72 km/hr on land and 5 knots at sea. It has an approximate range of 480 kilometers. By Dialogo January 23, 2012last_img read more

Read More →

More workers’ comp bills filed

first_imgMore workers’ comp bills filed A massive rewrite of Florida’s workers’ compensation system in a legislative special session last summer has paved the way for more bills in the 2004 Regular Session that began March 2.Some of that effort is expected follow-up to last year’s legislation, including a bill on how rates are set. But lawmakers are also looking at a financial crisis in the Joint Underwriting Association, the state-sponsored pool for businesses that can’t get private insurance, and at other repercussions of the bill.The Senate Banking and Insurance Committee in December released an interim report on last year’s bill. The report recommended changes in last year’s legislation, and also compared changes in some benefits and in plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees with other states, but make no proposals in those areas.Last year’s bill, among other changes, cut both worker benefits and payments to their attorneys for certain types of work. Bar Workers’ Compensation Section Chair Dennis Smejkal recently told the Board of Governors plaintiffs’ attorneys will be able to take only the cases of the most severely injured workers under the law.Rafael Gonzalez, a past section chair who monitors legislative activity for the section, said while bills will be filed, it’s not likely they will be as far-reaching as last year’s legislation.“I don’t think they’re going to touch attorneys’ fees and I don’t think they’re going to touch worker benefits [this year],” Gonzalez said. “They would like to give the changes that were passed last year a year to two [in operation], because they think they will eventually see something positive.”But Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac, said major changes could happen, especially if evidence continues that last year’s bill is having little effect on rates.“I believe everybody is saying it is broken,” he said. “We’re going to consider anything and everything that will fix it.”Rep. Kim Berfield, R-Clearwater, chair of the House Insurance Committee, said that both the House and Senate are working on new bills.Major efforts will focus on the Joint Underwriting Association, or JUA, and the process for setting workers’ comp rates, she said. Because of last year’s legislation, the JUA is forecasted to lose $34 to $36 million this year, while last year lawmakers had many questions about how rates are set and the lack of accountability for some numbers the state uses in determining rates.Berfield said a joint legislative committee has looked at rate-setting and a bill is being worked on, probably to be introduced by Sen. Jeff Atwater, R-Palm Beach Gardens.The JUA will be a higher profile issue, Barfield said, since “they are looking at a potential deficit of $36 million by the end of the year.”The JUA is made up of “subplans” for different types of businesses, and the problem is for Subplan D, which helps smaller businesses.The House and Senate each have reserved funds to help with the expected deficit, but neither has nearly enough, Berfield said. At the moment, she said bills are being looked at that would encourage private carriers to pick up some of those companies.Some senators, Berfield said, are interested in pursuing legislation based on the Senate Banking and Insurance Committee interim study.The report can be found at www.flsenate.gov/data/Publications/2004/Senate/reports/interim_reports/pdf/2004-110bi.pdf. More workers’ comp bills filedcenter_img March 15, 2004 Regular Newslast_img read more

Read More →

Ministry wants to increase SMEs role in big business supply chains

first_imgThe ministry has set itself a target of slashing Indonesia’s raw material imports by up to 35 percent to US$82 billion in 2022.Imports of raw materials and intermediary goods declined last year and during this year’s January-to-May period, signaling a cooling of manufacturing activity and household spending. Last year, imports totaled $125.9 billion, down more than 11 percent from 2018, Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data show.The program would also champion SMEs products through e-commerce platforms, including packaged food and beverages, fashion, healthcare products and sport equipment.Meanwhile, food manufacturing giant PT Indofood Sukses Makmur sourced tempeh, a fermented soybean product, as the main ingredient of its chips brand Qtela from a small enterprise, said Stefanus Indrayana, the firm’s general manager of corporate communication.Stefanus said Wednesday that, with the partnership, the small enterprise had gradually scaled up its production from 50 kilograms of tempeh per day to 1 ton.“Our partner has good products,” said Stefanus. “But we require certain standards, such as SNI. So we do a lot of mentoring, including for halal certificates, waste management, administrative matters and technical tools.”But not all companies have the flexibility to source their raw materials from small businesses at home, like bicycle manufacturer PT Insera Sena, which sells Polygon bicycles.Although it uses local tires, some components to make Polygon bicycles require a high precision, prompting the company to buy those from foreign suppliers, Insera Sena director William Gozali said.“Some of our components are made in Indonesia, but there are critical components that we have to import,” said William.Topics : The Industry Ministry is seeking to increase the role of small and medium enterprises (SME) in supplying raw materials for big businesses, as the government wants to reduce reliance on imported goods.A program that runs from July 1-15 aims to prepare selected SMEs by helping them with brand registration, packaging as well as with National Industrial Standards (SNI) and halal certification to meet big producers’ product standards, according to Gati Wibawaningsih, the ministry’s director general of small and medium enterprises.“The message this program is trying to convey is that local industries can produce what Indonesians need with quality products,” Gati said in a virtual press conference on Wednesday.The program is part of the government’s efforts to increase the role of small businesses, which contributed nearly 61 percent to the country’s economy, to help reduce big industries’ imports of raw materials and intermediate goods.last_img read more

Read More →

Million dollar sales at record levels across Australia’s capitals

first_imgMillion-dollar sales: 13 Tipuana Drive, Capalaba, sold for $1.03m on August 7, 2017. Picture: Realestate.com.auBrisbane has been steadily climbing from 0.1 per cent of houses having sold for $1m or more two decades ago, to 2.4 per cent 10 years ago and 7.9 per cent now.Brisbane’s proportion of units that sold for $1m or more was even less, going from 0.2 per cent in 1997 to 2.4 per cent in 2007 and now sitting at just 2.8 per cent. In comparison, Sydney saw 21.3 per cent of units sell for $1m or more in the year to June.It’s those sorts of figures that have spurred an influx of interstate buyers on the hunt for property investments in the third biggest capital.CoreLogic’s Australian research head Cameron Kusher said bracket creep was no longer a surprise in Sydney and Melbourne where values surged 77 per cent and 61 per cent in the past five years.Million-dollar sales: 10 Grattan Terrace, Wynnum, sold for $1m on the dot on August 8, 2017. Picture: Realestate.com.au Million-dollar sales: 49 Heidelberg Street, East Brisbane sold for $1.037m on August 1. Picture: Realestate.com.auALMOST a quarter of houses sold across the capitals cost six digits or more in the past year, with million-dollar sales now hitting record levels, latest data shows.Research by CoreLogic found that in the year to June, 23.2 per cent of all houses sold across Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, Darwin, Canberra and Hobart were priced at least $1m.While the figures were dominated by Sydney where a whopping 47.8 per cent of houses sold for over $1m and Melbourne (25.9 per cent), the third largest capital Brisbane was still showing surprising value for money for buyers with 8 per cent of houses in the six-figure region.BRISBANE’S FIRST $3M SUBURB LOOMSRINEHEART SELLING BRISBANE PROPERTIESGET THE COURIER — MAIL’S REAL ESTATE NEWS IN YOUR INBOX FREEMillion-dollar sales: 9 Highvale Street, Eight Mile Plains, sold for $1.825m on August 8, 2017. Picture: Realestate.com.au More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours agoMillion-dollar sales: 7606 Fairway Boulevard, Hope Island, sold for $1.795m on August 8, 2017. Picture: Realestate.com.aucenter_img Million-dollar sales: 17 Haig Street, Clayfield, sold for $1.125m on August 9, 2017. Picture: Realestate.com.au“With dwelling values continuing to climb, we anticipate that in another 12 months we’ll see an even higher proportion of sales sitting at or above $1 million,” he said.“The flip-side to this is that the ongoing increase in the proportion of residential properties selling in excess of $1m highlights the ongoing deterioration in the availability of housing affordability.”The pace of change has also begun to spread to regional housing markets, Mr Kusher said, which generally had lower costs than the capitals.“Across the combined regional areas the proportion of houses selling for at least $1m has increased from 3.5 per cent in June 2016 to 4.1 per cent in June 2017. Meanwhile, the proportion of units selling for at least $1m has increased to 3.5 per cent of all sales in June 2017, up from 3.2 per cent a year earlier.last_img read more

Read More →

Virginia Tech stuns Syracuse in overtime of ACC debut

first_img Comments Heading into Friday night’s game against Virginia Tech, Syracuse had yet to allow a goal in two games.The Hokies had no intentions of keeping the Orange’s slate clean.Just when it seemed that Nick Perea’s 17th minute goal would be enough for SU to escape with a win, Robert Alberti tied the game with five minutes left in regulation. Then Kai Marshall sealed a Virginia Tech win with a golden goal eight minutes into overtime.Just like that, the Orange’s enchanting Atlantic Coast Conference debut lost its zest in no more than 30 minutes.No. 17 Syracuse (2-1, 0-1 ACC) fell to Virginia Tech (2-1, 1-0 ACC) 2-1 at Thompson Field in Blacksburg, Va., on Friday night. After leading by one goal for 85 minutes, the Orange’s overtime loss can be defined by missed opportunities.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It was a good college soccer match,” head coach Ian McIntyre said. “But it is one that we let get away from us, up with five minutes to go. If we get that second goal the game is a lot different.”The Orange’s only score came on Perea’s penalty kick early in the first half. After that, SU created only a small handful of chances.  Virginia Tech goalkeeper Kyle Renfro earned the win with only three saves.The Hokies outshot the Orange 14-10. SU goalie Alex Bono finished with seven saves.“In the first half, both teams were getting their chances,” McIntyre said. “But we didn’t do a good enough job of creating chances in the second half. Then in overtime things could have went either way and they just beat us on the counterattack.”Speeding up play has been the Orange’s most effective scoring recipe so far this season. Friday, it was spoon fed a taste of its own tactics. After VT midfielder Brandon Eaton carried the ball into the open field, Marshall was able to put away the game’s decisive goal.Still, for a team just starting out in one of the nation’s premier soccer conferences, there are positives to walk away with.For 85 minutes, the Orange held the upper hand in its first test in unchartered waters. Perea, one of the team’s most experienced players, tallied a point in his third straight game. And SU’s young, impressionable lineup gained the experience of playing in a gritty conference contest.“We were pretty good tonight,” McIntyre said, “but big picture a lot of young players gained incredible experience playing in the environment we played in tonight.”For Bono, who watched the game’s clinching goal fall into the net behind him, the loss represents a feeling that the Orange will strive to never feel again, which he encapsulated in a tweet after the game.This is what it feels like. We’ll never feel like this again, I promise that #CuseSoccer #TomorrowIsANewDay— Alexander Bono (@Alex25Bono) September 7, 2013 Published on September 7, 2013 at 12:04 am Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jessecenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read More →