JUDGE PUTS DRINKS LICENSE ON HOLD AFTER HEARING OBJECTIONS TO DONEGAL BEACHFRONT RESORT PLAN

first_imgThe Cuan na Ri Development at Carrigart.A Judge has put a stay on granting an alcohol license for a controversial Donegal beachfront development after hearing objections from a local resident in court.Members of the Cuan na Ri Ocean Front Activity Centre and Resort planned for Aghadachor, Carrigart applied for the license at Letterkenny Circuit Court. The court was told that there were no objections from the Gardai or the Fire Service to the granting of the license.The alcohol license was to be extinguished from a premises in Rathdrum in Co Wicklow and transferred to the Co Donegal premises.However local resident Tony McCarry stood up in the public gallery and asked Judge Matthew Deery if he would listen to the concerns of local people.Judge Deery agreed and allowed Mr McCarry to outline the issues.Mr McCarry, who said his home house where he grew up was five hundred metres from the planned oceanfront centre, had caused major problems for locals.He said people in the area were not against the development but were against the issues which had arisen as a result.He claimed that access to the beachfront had now been cut-off and that the public were now being asked to pay a levy to access the beach.He claim that many public rights of ways to the stretch of beach on which the development was being built had now been locked by gates.He said that many elderly people were now terrified to visit the area because of threats from the developers.He also revealed that professional golfer Paul McGinley and a consortium had previously owned the land but could not get permission for their planned development.“How is it that these guys can come in and close the beach down.“People who live near this beach now have to walk four miles to the next beach. We want gates erected to be removed and we want access to our beach,” he said.He also claimed that while out walking with his son that a car tried to ram him off the road and that he was also verbally attacked by one of the developers of the site.Evidence was also given in court by architect John Masterson who said a number of technical issues arose on the development but these had been sorted.The owner of the property, Michael Anthony Preston, said he acquired the land in 2007 but did not begin developing it until 2012.He said his company had put in pedestrian access to the area and they had also build a car park.He said access was open between 8am and 10.30pm via a gate to the beach.He added that the beach was a special area of conservation which was controlled by the National Parks and Wildlife Service and not the developers adding that “access is quite easy.”Judge Deery said it appeared that there appeared to be no objections in relation to the alcohol license from the Gardai, the Fire Service or the Planning Authority.However he said he appreciated there were concerns amongst locals about the access to the beach.He asked both parties to come together on the matter.“I would ask Mr Preston to have a word with this man (Mr McCarry) to try and accommodate him,” said Judge Deery.He then adjourned his decision on the granting of the alcohol license until Thursday.JUDGE PUTS DRINKS LICENSE ON HOLD AFTER HEARING OBJECTIONS TO DONEGAL BEACHFRONT RESORT PLAN was last modified: July 16th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:alcohol licenseCarrigartCuan na RidonegalJudge Matthew DeeryLetterkenny Circuit Courtlast_img read more

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Raiders’ Trent Brown goes to I.R., Jacobs won’t play against Chargers

first_imgALAMEDA — Trent Brown was placed on injured reserve Wednesday a day after making his first Pro Bowl. His season is over.Josh Jacobs remains on the 53-man roster, but won’t face the Los Angeles Chargers Sunday because of a shoulder injury he’s played with since Oct. 20. Coach Jon Gruden is holding out hope Jacobs will be able to play against Denver in the regular-season finale on Dec. 29.Meanwhile, left guard Richie Incognito exited the locker room in a walking boot on his right ankle, …last_img

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Sanlam takes authors on a journey

first_imgStories told over the ages form an important part of heritage, offering the reader fragments of the past. They also provide a window into the imagination of the author. (Image: Sanlam Prize for Youth Literature)South Africa has many unique and authentic stories to tell, stories that live in the minds of those who have dreamed them, lived them or witnessed them, but who don’t have the opportunity to share them with the rest of the world.In looking to provide the stepping stones they need to get their stories out into the world, through its Sanlam Prize for Youth Literature competition, financial services group Sanlam offers promising young writers the chance to have their books published for others to read.Entries for the competition close on 7 October 2016, so there is still time for writers to enter and stand the chance of being one of the finalists.The competition has six categories: English, Afrikaans, Nguni languages, Sotho languages, Xitsonga and Tshivenda. Each category has two prizes: R12 000 for first place and R6 000 for second place.To be considered for the competition, the author’s book has to be suitable for people between the ages of 12 and 18 and be at least 25 000 words long. The competition is only open to citizens of South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia and Botswana.“As a bookseller I’m constantly on the lookout for more literature that is aimed at the youth that is both published and written locally, and the sad thing is that there just isn’t enough” says Jessica Smith from The Book Lounge in Cape Town.“But with the Sanlam Prize for Youth Literature, they provide a great platform for both established authors and emerging writers and it gives them the opportunity to have their work published.”250 WORDS A DAYThe competition invites writers to join their team of established authors and take advantage of the opportunity to spend some time with programme facilitators and get tips and inspiration from established authors who act as mentors.Smith explains that the 250 words a day challenge “makes the overwhelming task of writing a full-length novel feel that much more achievable.“The guidance that they provide and the tools that you are given are just invaluable.”Listen to 2013 winner Sipho Kekezwa talk about what the win has done for him:GET INVOLVEDIf you are an aspiring writer and you feel you have a story that is worth being told, you still have time to enter this year’s competition. Visit the Sanlam Prize for Youth Literature web page for more information.Entry forms are available on the website, along with details about how to enter and share your African stories for African youth. The competition gives you an opportunity to improve your writing and dive deeper into the world of storytelling.“Even for those whose stories are not published, a spark has been ignited and a love for both reading and writing solidified,” says Smith.“I am so grateful to this competition for allowing emerging voices to be heard and for talent to be nurtured. I absolutely cannot wait to see these works on our shelves.”PLAY YOUR PARTAre you playing your part to help improve the lives of those around you or the environment? Do you know of anyone who has gone out of their way to help improve South Africa and its people?If so, submit your story or video to our website and let us know what you are doing to improve the country for all.last_img read more

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Minibus therapy takes life skills counselling on the road

first_imgInnovative psychologist Banetsi Mphunga campaigns to break the stigma around mental health issues and take the anxiety out of therapy using a minibus taxi as a mobile treatment clinic in Cape Town townships.The people’s psychologist Banetsi Mphunga and his Volkswagen Caravelle minibus from which he offers free therapy sessions to people in Khayelitsha and further afield. (Image: Twitter)CD AndersonWhile Mphunga still maintains an office-bound practice at the Township Parents and Children Counselling Centre in Khayelitsha, the majority of his time is spent on the road, driving a minibus mobile clinic that offers free counselling sessions and life skills guidance to young people in the area.He started the idea in 2015, inspired by his work in youth development programmes. He had noticed that a lot of the youth he spoke to were too afraid to discuss their problems in a formal counselling session, in an unfamiliar environment.In the informal, more relaxed interior of the minibus, patients didn’t need to feel intimidated or claustrophobic, Mphunga told the Daily Vox website.He calls his facility an “emotional ambulance”, and while most cases he deals with are relaxed and constructive, there are times when he is called into action quickly and aggressively: more often than not when drugs and physical abuse are involved.He sees his ultimate aim as a people’s therapist to end the drug and alcohol cycle that is the starting-point of many mental health issues in young people.And he will go anywhere, at any time of the day, to fulfil that promise. “What I hope for them, is to show them despite whatever situation they have been going through, they can still make it,” Mphunga told the Daily Vox.While his work is focused primarily in Khayelitsha, the mobile clinic – a second-hand Volkswagen Caravelle with tinted windows to secure confidentiality – enables him to spread his work to surrounding areas, particularly in the rural farming areas in towns as far as Robertson and Malmesbury.It also allows him to meet teachers, priests and community leaders on their home turf, and offer advice on how to identify and best resolve issues such as depression, anxiety and anti-social behaviour in children.Mphunga also offers trauma counselling for the elderly, a section of the community often forgotten when it comes to mental health. Most of the time, old people just want someone to talk to and listen to their problems, Mphunga says, but sometimes there are more serious unresolved issues that can be addressed in sessions.Community response to Mphunga’s minibus therapy has been positive. While he understands he may not be able to cover all the bases for effective long-term therapy, he is confident that making people comfortable with the idea of talking about their problems in a spacious, non-threatening environment will help them seek out more regular, more effective counselling.He is currently crowdfunding for ongoing maintenance improvements for his minibus, as well as raising funds for youth-oriented development programmes in his community, through a GoFundMe page, which you can visit here. Source: News24, Daily Vox, The Good Things GuyWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Hearings Open on Solar Panel Trade Case

first_imgTariffs opposed by trade groupThe Solar Energy Industries Association claims that tariffs and minimum PV module prices would threaten an industry that now employs more than 260,000 Americans and could mean the loss of 88,000 jobs by next year. In a letter to the ITC in May, the association said that the duties sought by Suniva would be “extremely damaging” to the industry.“In particular,” the letter said, “the duty on unassembled cells, more than doubling their cost, would adversely affect U.S. module assembly operations which account for most of the roughly 1,500 CSPV cell/module manufacturing jobs that currently exist in the United States.” The SEIA also said “the erection of trade walls” would do nothing to address the underlying problem of excess global manufacturing.The association criticized the two petitioners for a “long history of management and technical failures.”A group of 16 U.S. senators has also joined the battle with a letter outlining their “deep concern” over the prospect of new trade penalties. “Solar companies in our states believe the requested trade protection would double the price of solar panels,” the senators wrote. “Increasing costs will stop solar growth dead in its tracks, threatening tens of thousands of American workers in the solar industry and jeopardizing billions of dollars in investment in communities across the country.” GTM said in a June post that the request for a tariff of 40 cents per watt on cells and a minimum price of 78 cents per watt on modules “would cause unprecedented demand destruction.” RELATED ARTICLES What happens nextThe ITC will determine by late next month whether Suniva and SolarWorld have been damaged by imported solar technology and make a recommendation to President Trump by November 13, The New York Times said.In an earlier case before the ITC, SolarWorld Americas and six other U.S. manufacturers claimed that Chinese makers were benefiting from unfair government subsidies, The Times reported. Tariffs resulting from that case ranged from about 20% to 55%, and helped fuel a $10 million expansion at SolarWorld’s Hillsboro, Oregon, factory.More recently, domestic demand for PV modules in China dropped and manufacturers reduced prices, forcing global prices down. The domestic industry’s share of the panel market has been falling, reaching just 11% last year, the report said. Could a Trade Dispute With China End the U.S. Solar Boom?New Tariffs on Chinese Solar PanelsSolar Beats Utility Power in Many CitiesSolar Thermal Is Really, Really DeadAn Introduction to Photovoltaic Systemscenter_img The U.S. International Trade Commission opened hearings in Washington on Tuesday that could result in higher prices for imported solar technology and, according to a solar trade association, cost 88,000 Americans their jobs.The petition seeking tariffs on photovoltaic (PV) cells and minimum PV module prices was filed earlier this year by Suniva, a bankrupt solar manufacturer, which said China and other Asian countries were “flooding” the U.S. with solar cells and modules, The Hill reported. The Atlanta-based company said that the American crystalline silicon cell industry was “disintegrating” and would not be able to survive as imported technology “unexpectedly exploded and prices have collapsed.”Two days after the ITC said it would launch an investigation into Suniva’s complaint, SolarWorld Americas said it would join as a co-petitioner for the tariffs.The case illustrates the complexities of the international solar market. A majority share of Suniva, which filed for bankruptcy on April 18, is owned by Shunfeng International Clean Energy, a Chinese firm. SolarWorld Americas also has a foreign parent company, the German firm SolarWorld AG. It, too, has filed for insolvency, the German equivalent of bankruptcy, according to an article in PV magazine. The ITC proceedings will be closely watched, with a number of solar workers making the trek to Washington to show their opposition to potential trade penalties. “Fired up and ready to go!” one of them said in a #SaveSolarJobs post on Twitter. “Solar workers showing up to show the ITC what’s at stake.”last_img read more

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