After six years in prison, journalist is banished to remote city

first_imgNews News RSF_en News IranMiddle East – North Africa Reporters Without Borders condemns the way the Iranian authorities are continuing to persecute the well-known journalist Ahmad Zeydabadi, banishing him to the northeastern city of Gonabad after he was released from prison yesterday on completing a six-year jail sentence. Receive email alerts IranMiddle East – North Africa Follow the news on Iran Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists June 9, 2021 Find out more to go furthercenter_img Iran is ranked 173rd out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. Organisation March 18, 2021 Find out more Aged 50 and the father of three children, Zeydabadi was arrested on 14 June 2009, two days after then President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection. A victim of one of the Stalinist-style show trials in Tehran in August 2009, he was sentenced the following November to six years in prison followed by five years of internal exile in Gonabad and a ban on political and journalistic activities.He was transferred directly to Gonabad on being released yesterday.“Yet again, we condemn the iniquity of the Iranian judicial system and its attacks on freedom of information,” said Reza Moini, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Iran/Afghanistan desk.“The Islamic Republic of Iran is one of the world’s most oppressive countries. It does not limit itself to arbitrary arrests and sentences, but also imposes ‘complementary sentences’ on its citizens with the aim of silencing them forever. Such sentences violate articles 12 and 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which Iran is a party.”Moini added: “Zeydabadi should be able to live with his family and should be free to work.”Zeydabadi has a long history of persecution. He was repeatedly the target of summonses and arrests in 2000, 2003 and 2007. He was even jailed for writing an open letter to Ayatollah Khamenei entitled “Why cannot we criticize the Supreme Leader’s actions?”As a result of this letter, he was placed in solitary confinement in Section 209 of Tehran’s Evin prison and subjected to a great deal or pressure by intelligence ministry interrogators, who tried in vain to extract a confession and pubic apology to the Supreme Leader.An emblematic journalist, Zeydabadi worked for many newspapers including Etéla’at in 1998 and Hamshahri until 2002. He received the Golden Pen of Freedom Award from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) in 2009 and the UNESCO / Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize in 2011. After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists Help by sharing this information May 22, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 After six years in prison, journalist is banished to remote city News Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 February 25, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Read More →

Going Home Again

first_imgA steep mountain road Brings a Runner Back to His Roots“You OK, son?”It’s mid-October of 2003—one of those crystal-clear fall afternoons that never seems to end—and an older man in a sedan has pulled up beside me on Georgia Highway 180 Spur. The two-lane blacktop snakes its way up Brasstown Bald, the highest point in the state, and I’ve decided to try running the three miles from its base at Jack’s Gap all the way to the thimble-shaped observation tower at the summit.“Oh, yeah. I’m fine. I just—” I wheeze as he interrupts me, asking if I need a ride. I’m hardly a mile up the highway, and he’s worried. Things aren’t going well.That run up Brasstown 15 years ago was the first of many I’d take while I attended college just a few miles down the road. In fact, those trips became a near-weekly occurrence: aim the car north, find a rock station broadcasting out of Atlanta, and wind my way on mostly empty state highways into the cluster of high mountains the next county over.And then there was the run itself. The climb up Brasstown is a beast, ascending at grades approaching 20 percent—a road steep enough to give pro cyclists fits during the Tour de Georgia in the early 2000s. Running to the summit just felt like you’d accomplished something badass, even in the age before a selfie was needed to make an outdoor trip complete.Looking back, I’m not sure why my runs up Brasstown became a thing. Maybe it was an escape from studying, or maybe it was a chance to get my mind off of stumbling my way into adulthood. Maybe it wasn’t even the running at all but the chance to get out alone in the mountains for awhile. One of my friends says that you never feel more alive than when you’re driving a little too fast down a southern backroad with the windows down and the radio blaring. He’s not wrong.Even though I and everything else around it had changed, the mountain—and the struggle of climbing it—was the same. And when it comes to why we get outdoors in the first place, isn’t that the point?Regardless of the reason, that feeling didn’t last. I eventually started a career and moved from visiting the mountains once a week to living in them, albeit a few hours north in Virginia. And over time, driving into the mountains quit being so special. It’s a feeling that all of us who live in the Blue Ridge risk. Our favorite parks and trails can become all too familiar, and the hills that once seemed so striking on our horizon can become just another part of the landscape. Today, I’ll often catch myself grumbling through traffic on my way to the trailhead after work to squeeze in an evening run.I never really thought about that change until this past winter, when a work trip put me back in Georgia and not too far from Brasstown. I ended up with a free afternoon, so I pointed the car north again and headed for the mountains just like I’d done years earlier. I wasn’t sure how it would turn out. The world seems angrier now, my understanding of it a bit wearier, and my body an undisclosed amount of weight heavier than when I made that first run up the mountain as a teenager. As I drove into the hills, I fumbled around for that old rock station but ended up finding someone shouting over political talk radio instead.I wish I could report that my return to Brasstown went well, but it didn’t. I started out from Jack’s Gap too fast, forgot my pacing, and blew up midway through a particularly steep grunt where the road angles right up the nose of the ridge. I walked, cussed, and trotted at intervals from there.At the top, though, I remembered why I made those runs so many years ago. In 15 years’ time, not much was different on the summit. The Brasstown Wilderness still cloaked the ridges surrounding the lookout, while the Blue Ridge gradually faded to the Piedmont to my south. Lake Chatuge glittered in the valley below. Even though I and everything else around it had changed, the mountain—and the struggle of climbing it—was the same. And when it comes to why we get outdoors in the first place, isn’t that the point?Maybe I’m just turning this essay into a therapy session, but maybe that’s also one of the many things the mountains can be. A few weeks after my trip to Georgia, I was sitting through an especially dull workday when that run up Brasstown came to mind. I snuck out of the office early, but this time I headed for the highest summit in the county instead of the park where I do my usual evening run. I left the car in a pull-out at the base of the mountain and began climbing an approach road that led to a lookout tower a couple of thousand feet higher up. It wasn’t Brasstown, but it was close enough.This run didn’t go any better, but as I eased around a sharp curve, an engine revved behind me. A pickup crept up the road, and a concerned voice called out from the driver’s seat.“You alright?”For a moment, it didn’t matter what mountain I was on. Everything clicked into place, and a goofy smile flashed across my face. “Oh, yeah,” I yelled back. “Everything’s fine.”last_img read more

Read More →

South American Police Forces Coordinate Search For Small Plane Missing In Peru

first_imgBy Dialogo June 16, 2010 The police forces of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, and Peru and Interpol are investigating the location of a small plane that disappeared last week with nine people on board while flying over the Nasca lines, in southeastern Peru, the local police announced Monday. “We are pursuing several theories. The investigation is at an advanced stage, and we are in contact with elements of the police forces in other countries, along with Interpol,” the director-general of the Peruvian National Police, Miguel Hidalgo, told the press. “In the next few days an official finding will be made about the disappearance of the plane,” he added. The Peruvian authorities and the company that owns the Cessna plane have ruled out the possibility of an accident. “The radars detected it away from its planned route,” Peruvian defense minister Rafael Rey said Saturday in reference to press reports that have located the plane near the border with Bolivia and Brazil hours after it went missing. The initial supposition was that the plane had suffered an accident, but as the hours passed and after a fruitless aerial search, a possible act of piracy began to be suspected. The suspected kidnappers rented the plane using false identities and documents Thursday, for a tourist flight over the enigmatic pre-Inca Nasca lines, four hundred kilometers south of Lima.last_img read more

Read More →

CNY Firemen’s Association Convention, set to be held in Owego, postponed

first_imgOWEGO (WBNG) — Another event set to take place this summer has been postponed due to the coronavirus. “An awful head start for it, really. You just have to contact people and make sure they’re going to show up again next year, simple as that,” said Bidwell. Not only does the convention hit close to home with Owego’s history, but it also brings a lot of people into town. On the bright side, it’s not canceled, just postponed, giving organizers a leg-up on planning for next year. “If this coronavirus ever gets over with, we’ll get back to what we’re supposed to do, simple as that,” said Bidwell. It holds a special meaning for the village of Owego. The association represents fire departments throughout 20 counties in the state and the convention brings them together for meetings, hose races, parades and celebrations. But now Owego will have to wait until 2021 to host. “It brings a lot of business into the village for a whole weekend, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday,” said convention co-chair and former Owego Fire Chief Ed Bidwell. “It allows businesses to pick up additional business that weekend. It’s really worth it.” The Central New York Firemen’s Association convention was planned for July 9 through 12 in Owego. The association’s first president was former Owego Fire Chief Frank Baker, who also donated the recently restored fireman’s fountain in memory of his son. The last time Owego hosted the CNY Firemen’s Association convention was 2010. The new date is set for July 8 through 11, 2021.last_img read more

Read More →

Side Biter Chassis in second season as sponsor of IMCA’s North Central Region

first_imgCLEAR LAKE, Iowa – Side Biter Chassis returns for a second season as title sponsor of IMCA’s North Central Region for Modifieds.The Clear Lake, Iowa, chassis builder is owned by veteran Modified driver Ryan Ruter and again provides part of the $6,000 point fund to be paid to top 10 drivers in the region that includes tracks in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, Saskatchewan, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Champion of the Side Biter Chassis North Central Region earns $2,500, with $1,250 for se­cond, $625 for third, $325 for fourth, $300 for fifth and $200 for sixth through 10th.Drivers must display two Side Biter decals on their race car to be eligible for point fund shares. Checks will be presented during the national awards banquet in November, or mailed beginning the next week from the IMCA home office.“We are proud to represent the North Central Region again in the IMCA Modified division. Our passion has always been the grass roots racing and that starts with our local racers,” Ruter said. “We are happy to provide a portion of the point fund for these regional racers as a way of giving back.”More information about Side Biter chassis and services is available by calling 641 357-1600 and at Facebook.com/RuterRacing.“The Side Biter chassis is now built in a new state-of-the-art facility in Clear Lake, Iowa, and that expansion has led to additional offerings of Northern SportMods, Stock Cars, and even boat docks if you are in the market for one of those, but the Side Biter Modified remains the cornerstone of Ryan’s business,” IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder commented. “It is great to come along side them in that growth and we’re proud to have them back representing the North Central Region again this year.”last_img read more

Read More →

Syracuse co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Sean Lewis to take Kent State head coaching job

first_imgSyracuse co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Sean Lewis will be the next head coach at Kent State, according to multiple reports.Dino Babers saw this coming. In answering the last question of his final appearance with reporters this season, Syracuse’s head coach said he anticipated any changes among his coaching staff to happen “naturally.”“We’ll lose staff just because our coaches will get hired from other people,” Babers said. “When you start doing the things that we’re doing, people notice.”Count Kent State among them, as the Golden Flashes have hired Babers’ co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. Lewis came to SU with Babers when he was hired after the 2015 season, and coached under Babers at each of his previous two jobs, Bowling Green and Eastern Illinois.Lewis takes over a Kent State program that finished 2-10 in 2017. Like Syracuse, the Golden Flashes did not win a game on the road. They rank 127th in total offense with 275 yards per game. There are 129 FBS teams.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLeaving SU is the man who convinced Babers to put virtual reality in the quarterback room of a pass-heavy team. In two years with Lewis owning a share of the offensive leadership, the Orange passed more than it ever did in program history.With the early signing period for the class of 2018 beginning on Wednesday, the move comes at an inopportune time for SU. Lewis is the primary contact for plenty of recruits. Several commits have told The Daily Orange his decision to leave does not change their standing.Babers will hold a press conference on Wednesday at 4 p.m. to introduce the incoming signing class. Comments Published on December 18, 2017 at 4:29 pm Contact: [email protected] | @jtbloss Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read More →