Guardiola says Man City aren’t new Invincibles

first_imgShare on: WhatsApp Sunday’s game against Arsenal is set to be the first time Alexis Sanchez faces City since a £60 million ($78.4 million, 67.5 million euros) move to the Etihad Stadium fell through at the end of August.Guardiola refused to be drawn on the prospect of resurrecting that deal, either in January or at the end of the season, when the Chile international’s contract runs out.“The transfer window is closed, so it’s not time to talk about that,” Guardiola said.“I have respect for Arsenal and especially for my own players. In the period that the transfer window is open, I leave other people to talk about that.“You know my opinion on the players I have. On Alexis, you know my opinion, but he’s an Arsenal player so it’s not correct to talk about that, especially before we play them.”Guardiola believes City should be wary not just of Sanchez, but also of Mesut Ozil, another point in a three-pronged attack that also features Alexandre Lacazette.Ozil, like Sanchez, is out of contract next year, but has faced criticism for a lack of goals and assists this season.“I don’t have doubts about him, first in terms of quality,” said Guardiola, who came up against Ozil during his time as Barcelona coach.“I enjoy him and have suffered from him at Real Madrid and here. He gets criticised when the team loses. He is a big target when they lose. But I admire him.“Maybe his body language doesn’t help him too much, but sometimes that confuses the opinion of the critics.“I don’t have doubts about his quality. It’s good for the Premier League to have players of this talent, but hopefully on Sunday he can play a bad, bad, bad game.” Manchester, United Kingdom | AFP |  Pep Guardiola has promised Arsene Wenger that Manchester City have no chance of emulating his Arsenal team’s 2003/04 record of completing a Premier League season unbeaten.Arsenal were dubbed the ‘Invincibles’ after becoming only the second team — after Preston North End in 1888/89 — to go through an English top-flight campaign without losing a game.City are unbeaten after 10 games of the league season, but Wenger has suggested it will be difficult for them to match his side’s achievement and City boss Guardiola agrees with the Arsenal manager.“I would like to say to Arsene that this record belongs to him. We are not going to break it,” Guardiola said on Friday ahead of his side’s home game with Arsenal on Sunday.“He has to be calm. He has to be sure that is not going to happen. It was an exceptional team.“To stay unbeaten in the Premier League is something fantastic. He has to know that we don’t want to break this record, but we want to play well and beat them on Sunday.”City have not lost any of their 16 competitive games this season, winning 14 of them and beating Wolverhampton Wanderers on penalties after a draw in the League Cup.They sit five points clear at the top of the table, but Guardiola played down Chelsea manager Antonio Conte’s suggestion that City are on course for the title.“We are five points ahead of Manchester United,” he told reporters at City’s Manchester training base.“How many games are left? Twenty-eight. How many points? Eighty-four. We are five in front. It is nothing.“If you say that until next May we are going to play like we have in the last two months, I’d say: ‘Wow, we have a good chance to win the Premier League’. But who is going to assure me we will not get injuries?“Even for the best teams in the world it’s hard to maintain what we have done over the last two months.”– Ozil admiration –last_img read more

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Listen To Your Children’s Concerns Over Recent Murder of Mother of…

first_imgIn the aftermath of the Asbury Park shooting Tuesday, when Neptune police Sgt. Philip Seidle was accused of shooting to death the mother of his nine children – his ex-wife – Tamara Seidle, in front of their youngest daughter, experts say parents’ and schools’ primary concern should be to help children talk about and cope with the traumatic news.Liz Rudder from CPC Behavioral Healthcare recommends that parents provide a comfortable environment for their children when they are discussing a traumatic event.“The goal is to be honest and open with dialogue,” Rudder said. “Communicating facts without the full detail is recommended.”It is essential to know what happened, but not necessarily the grim, gruesome details of it all.“Reassuring children that they are safe is extremely important,” Rudder said. “It isimpossible to protect kids from everything, especially since news is easily accessible through different outlets.”Shock ripped throughout Monmouth County, as news of the shooting became the lead story of local news outlets and quickly rose to national news prompting schools to take steps to help children cope with the event.Dr. Michael Lake, the Superintendent of Neptune Township School District, has taken a number of measures to ease student trauma. He arranged for a grief counseling team to come into the high school Wednesday morning and a crisis response team will be in school for the remainder of the week. Lake said the team will meet with the administration and provide guidance to students and teachers who are suffering from the crisis.The Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office arraigned and formally charged Philip Seidle Wednesday with first-degree murder, second-degree possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose and second-degree endangering the welfare of a child Wednesday.A judge denied the motion by Philip Seidle’s lawyer to reduce his bail, which is currently set at $2 million with no 10 percent option.He is currently being held in the Monmouth County Correctional Institution without parole and faces a maximum sentence of life imprisonment, or a minimum of 30 years, subject to the “No Early Release Act” requiring him to serve 85 percent of the sentence imposed before becoming eligible for release on parole.As Tamara Seidle was fleeing from her ex-husband, who was driving a 2005 Honda Pilot, her 2012 Volkswagen Jetta crashed into a parked car on Sewall Avenue, according to LeMieux.Philip Seidle got out of his vehicle, pulled out his .40-caliber Glock service handgun, approached the driver’s side of the Jetta and shot his ex-wife multiple times, LeMieux said.“He does this while his own daughter is located in his passenger seat – in his vehicle,” LeMieux told the judge.As Asbury Park police, who responded at 11:26 a.m. to an unrelated motor vehicle accident, arrived at the scene, they watched Seidle shoot multiple times into the car and did not pull their weapons. Seidle then put the gun to his head. At that point, police talked him into letting officers retrieve his 7-year old daughter from the passenger side of his Silver Honda Pilot and bring her to safety.Seidle then moved to the front of the Jetta, firing several more shots through the windshield at Tamara Seidle, and then pointed the gun at his head provoking a 20-to 25-minute standoff with police.He surrendered to police at 11:52 a.m., according to the release. Investigators from multiple departments were at the scene including Asbury Park, Neptune Township, the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office, Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Marshal’s Service.The case is assigned to Monmouth County First Assistant Prosecutor Marc LeMieux. Monmouth County Detective John Leibfried and Asbury Park Detective Dan Kowsaluk are investigating.The couple, divorced May 27, had nine children together between the ages of 7 and 24.A meeting was held with Township Administrator Vito Gadaleta in hopes of putting together a task force of individuals who will provide financial help and stability for the Seidle children. A township wide fundraising appeal will take place and Neptune police have pledged to help.Lake said the Seidle children were school leaders as they were involved in extracurricular activities including sports, and Mrs. Seidle was a well-known mother at the Neptune Township schools.Not only was Mrs. Seidle involved with the schools, but she was also a “pillar of faith” within the Mother of Mercy Parish community, said the Bishop of the Diocese of Trenton David M. O’Connell, C.M.Tamara Seidle was the coordinator of religious education at the parish in Asbury Park.“Our minds cannot fathom the horror that transpired when Tamara Seidle was shot and killed in front of her own seven-year old daughter on Tuesday morning in Asbury Park,” O’Connell said in a press release.“Tamara had been such a pillar of faith within the community of Mother of Mercy Paris. The broken hearts of all those who knew her and worked with her, both in the parish and across the Diocese, are struggling with unimaginable and inconsolable grief at her loss.”The accused murderer is a 22-year veteran of the Neptune Township Police Department and was first hired as a patrolman in July 1993. He was promoted to sergeant in the Patrol Division in January 2009. He was also a veteran of the United States Navy, serving from March 1986 until his honorable discharge in November 1990.“(Philip Seidle) was an exemplary model of what a police officer should be,” Sofia Guerra, owner and editor at Always Catholic blog, said. “His kind personality, yet commanding presence quelled many disputes at a local hot spot.” Guerra said she is absolutely shocked that this happened, as she has known Seidle as a long time Neptune resident.Connor White, Joey Dominguez and Samantha Caramela contributed to this storylast_img read more

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Holmdel’s New Mayor Is Greg Buontempo

first_imgStory and photo by Joseph SapiaHOLMDEL – In what came as a surprise to some Tuesday night, the governing body unanimously elected a new leader from among its committee members at its annual reorganization meeting.Committeeman Greg Buontempo will succeed Eric Hinds, who has been a high-profile presence as the township observes redevelopment of the 472-acre Bell Works site, holds a public vote on turf fields for Cross Farm Park, and fights JCPL’s proposed power line project along the railroad right-of-way.This is Buontempo’s final year of his second three-year term. “Thank you all for your confidence in me to lead Holmdel Township for the next year,” Buontempo said. Perhaps things did not go as smoothly as they could have for the all-Republican Township Committee. A few residents addressed the committee, speaking in praise of outgoing Mayor Eric Hinds, who is beginning his third three-year term on the committee.Hinds had acknowledged he would have liked to have been selected mayor again for the third straight year.“It’s never easy (relinquishing the mayor’s seat),” Hinds said. “It’s the way the system works. I can be disappointed, but I understand it. “Of course, I want to be mayor,” Hinds said. “(But) I support Greg and move forward.”Hinds said some did not understand that although Hinds held the mayor’s seat when he was running in last year’s election, he was not running for mayor, but for a committee seat.“I voted for him (Hinds) to be mayor,” resident Paul Andersen told the committee. “I feel my vote was not utilized in the way it was cast.”Buontempo agreed some did not understand the township committee form of government, which also is in place in neighboring Hazlet, Middletown and Colts Neck.Under the township committee form of New Jersey municipal government, voters in Holmdel elect five members at large for staggered, three year terms, which begin the first week in January. At the annual reorganization meeting, the five committee members select who among them will be mayor and deputy mayor for the coming year. While the mayoral title carries a leadership role and prestige, along with some powers, the committee essentially is a roundtable with all members having equal power under the law.Buontempo said the township committee form of government “was a learning experience” when he first encountered it.Committeeman Patrick Impreveduto, a former mayor, was elected deputy mayor by his four colleagues with Impreveduto abstaining.In his mayoral remarks, Buontempo talked about progress being made in town at the Bell Works site, formerly Bell Labs until about 10 years ago, on Crawfords Corner Road. Companies moving to the multi-use commercial site include JCP&L and software maker iCIMS. One million square feet of commercial space will be active at Bell Works in the next two or three years, Buontempo said.Also, the Holmdel branch of the Monmouth County Library is to relocate from the basement of Town Hall to Bell Works in late 2017 or early 2018. At Bell Works, the branch’s size will be 17,000 square feet, a jump from its current 2,500.“It’s going to be part library, part learning center, part historical museum,” Buontempo said.The museum will trace Bell Labs’ work in the township in a display “threaded through the library,” said Buontempo, explaining the committee came up with the idea. He said the museum is envisioned as both placards of information and physical objects on display.“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Buontempo said. Somerset Development, the owner-developer of Bell Works, will provide $1 million toward the estimated $1.5 million to $1.6 million renovation of the library on the second floor of the six-story, 2-million-square-foot former Bell Labs building. The township will be responsible for the rest of the money.Also, Somerset Development is giving the township a free perpetual lease for the library.On Thursday, Jan. 12, an informational session will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Bell Works on the library project, Bountempo said.Buontempo was sworn in as mayor by Freeholder Serena DiMaso, a Holmdel resident and former mayor.Impreveduto could not fully raise his right hand when he was sworn in as deputy mayor because his arm was in a sling from recent shoulder surgery. He injured the shoulder months ago in a fall.When state Senator Joseph M. Kyrillos Jr. swore in Impreveduto, the senator joked about him having his “right fingers raised,” rather than his right arm and hand.The committee honored Hinds with his service as mayor with a proclamation, which prompted a standing ovation.Hinds looked back at being mayor in 2016. He said accomplishments included an online township newsletter, a town-wide cleanup and a career night for students.“I tried to attend a ton of events and bring the community together,” Hinds said. But he will not rest now that he does not have the mayor’s position. “It’s not my nature to sit back,” Hinds said.Joe Crowley, a resident, told the committee, “I would like to thank Eric for all his passion to the community.”Hinds and Committeeman Michael Nikolis, both winners in November, were sworn into their new terms by Kyrillos and DiMaso, respectively. Also in attendance at the organization was state Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon.Appointments included:Township attorney: Michael L. Collins of the Archer and Greiner firmPlanner: Jennifer BeahmEngineer: Edward G. Broberg of T&M AssociatesAuditor: Robert AllisonJudge: Mary CaseyProsecutor: The Citta, Holzapfel and Zabarsky firmPublic defender: Raymond RayaCode enforcement officer: Loni LucinaZoning Officer and Fire inspector: David OlsenPurchasing agent: Barbara KoveleskyHistorian: Rhonda Beck-Edwardslast_img read more

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Election 2017: Five Compete for Two Open Highlands Seats

first_imgGreg WellsAge: 42Qualifications: Member of Highlands Open Space and Recreation Committees; former member of Highlands Land Use BoardProfession: Product Leader for Nielsen Holdings PLCCampaign Slogan: New Perspective, Fresh Ideas, Real ActionFor Greg Wells, his platform is influenced by the words of a mentor – crumbs make cake. Every little thing in town matters to the whole big picture.“It doesn’t seem like we’re really executing right now,” Wells said, adding he wants “to see if we can actually get some stuff done down here.”Wells, who lives close to the Seastreak ferry terminal, sees the dearth of parking as a real detriment to the residents in that section. He said investigating a solution is paramount.“There were times when we thought Seastreak was going to go out of business,” said Wells. “Now that they’re so popular, we have a real parking problem. It’s something that affects all of the people who live down there.”Regarding downtown flooding, Wells said executing on previously engineered projects is important. Wells also said he wants to create an “engineering project manager” position in Highlands. That person would report to the borough administrator and would be the point-of-contact for any and all infrastructure improvement projects.“Get a full-time position in town to execute on these large-scale engineering projects,” he said.  “Everybody needs to agree there’s too many cooks in the kitchen.”Wells also had a number of ideas to benefit taxpayers, including executing on shared service agreements with neighboring towns, and improving upon the unique nautical recreation opportunities.Regarding Shadow Lawn, Wells said his view might be more unique. He is for redeveloping the property, but doesn’t “want to write the developer a blank check.”He wants to rely on resident surveys done between 2015 and 2016, where over half of Highlands residents said they were comfortable with the property’s current zoning of mid- to high-rise.“I am for development up there,” Wells said, “but responsibly and with input from the community.”John CobergAge: 65Qualifications: Highlands Department of Public Works employee of 25 years; former captain of Highlands First Aid Squad.Profession: RetiredCampaign Slogan: NoneLife-long resident John Coberg, a U.S. Army Vietnam veteran who worked in Highlands for over two decades, said Highlands has struggled to come back after Sandy hit in October 2012.“I look at what they (Highlands borough council) have done since Sandy ended, and I’ve seen everything concentrated on the main street,” he said. “But if you turn down any one of those side streets, it’s terrible.”Coberg was critical of the post-Sandy rebuild, citing communities like Sea Bright and Union Beach which have rebuilt in a timelier fashion.“We’re only a little town, and all that got done was Bay Avenue?” Coberg questioned.Coberg said, if elected, he would push to get away from the “fighting with one another” he sees happening on the current borough council, and look to open up lines of communication.Among his different platforms, Coberg said he wants to implement parking meters along Shore Drive for Seastreak commuters who park on the street; not redevelop Shadow Lawn Trailer Park into multi-level housing; and focus on finding state and federal grants to help Highlands.He is pushing for major beach replenishment from Sandy Hook Bay Marina down to Miller Beach, so residents can benefit in more than one way.“That’s going to keep the water away and keep the heritage of this town,” he said.This article was first published in the Oct. 19-26, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times. By Jay Cook |HIGHLANDS – With the five-year anniversary of Super Storm Sandy around the corner, each candidate running in this year’s election said it’s time for Highlands to step forward in the post-Sandy rebuild. Opening lines of communication between the borough and its residents was also brought up by each candidate. Highlands operates a non-partisan government and has two open seats this year as council members Doug Card and Rebecca Kane-Wells are not seeking re-election. The two open seats on the Borough Council come with a full, three-year term. All five candidates have been invited to attend a debate night on Friday, Oct. 20, at 8 p.m. at the Robert D. Wilson Community Center, 22 Snug Harbor Ave. It will be moderated by former Highlands resident Muriel J. Smith.Frank NolanAge: 47Qualifications: Highlands Councilman from 2006 to 2009; Highlands Mayor from 2010 to 2016; member of Highlands Land Use BoardProfession: Real Estate Agent with Burke & Manna, Sea Bright; Title Agent with Two Rivers Title, Little SilverCampaign Slogan: Leadership, Experience, and Integrity Mean SomethingNolan, the only resident running in this election with elected political office experience, said it’s the clear-cut reason why he should return to the council.“Yes, that means I have a record you can pick at,” Nolan said, “but also I’m not going to need on-the-job training.”The former mayor didn’t seek re-election to respect term limits. He said it gave him the opportunity to step back and refocus on his positions.Nolan said, if elected, he’ll focus on funding the school system, infrastructure, and the police department. Those three entities are the pillars of the Highlands community, he said.One of this election’s hot topics – infrastructure – was discussed heavily this summer when fecal matter was draining into the stormwater sewer system. It was polluting Highlands’ two public beaches.Nolan said during his time on the borough council, pre-Hurricane Irene, the council approved a bond for an infrastructure reconstruction project. It entailed installing a pump station on Snug Harbor Avenue, as well as creating more floodline piping through town. He said it is ready to go, and would advocate for starting that project.Nolan also said he’s a parent to a child currently in the Highlands school system. He said that alone means he has an investment in what the school system is doing, and how much funding it could need.“You also want to make sure you have a good product,” he said. “The kids who we’re sending there are our future leaders.”Talk about having Sea Bright students leave Shore Regional and attend Henry Hudson Regional have resurfaced, Nolan said, and he would be receptive to that plan “if it doesn’t water down the product.”“If we have the capacity, I’m all for it,” he said.Ken Braswell Age: 58Qualifications: Member of Highlands Land Use Board; Former chair, vice chair, member of Highlands/Atlantic Highlands Sewer AuthorityProfession: Owner of ShoreGrafx, HighlandsCampaign Slogan: Levelheaded LeadershipBraswell, running for office the first time with running mate Rosemary Ryan, said improving the underground infrastructure would be his top priority if elected.The Army Corps of Engineers presented a plan to Highlands in April which called for building a flood wall along much of the borough’s bayshore frontage to protect from Sandy-caliber storms. Braswell said he was against the plan because homeowners would still need flood insurance and basic roadway flooding wouldn’t cease.As a small business owner with an office on Bay Avenue, he said the perpetual fear of flooding is a real concern.“It’s been overlooked way too long in Highlands, and it’s going to catch up to us,” Braswell said. “It has already in some respects.”With experience on the expired Highlands/Atlantic Highlands Sewer Authority, Braswell believes he can open talks with neighboring towns and the state to reduce the amount of stormwater draining downhill along Route 36.“We just can’t handle it anymore,” he said, bluntly. “We can’t attract new businesses.”It’s a Catch-22, Braswell continued, as the borough will have to pay to fix flooding issues and, until it happens, tax revenue from new businesses will be dormant. He said finding that balance is key.Fixing the flooding is “just the willpower to go through and find a way to do it without impacting our taxes a great deal,” he said.His wife, Carla Cefalo Braswell, is president of the Highlands Business Partnership. Braswell wants to strengthen the relationship between local businesses and the governing body.Rosemary RyanAge: 49Qualifications: Member of Highlands Land Use Board; member of Highlands Business Partnership; former president of Henry Hudson Regional Board of EducationProfession: Paralegal with Law Office of Toby Grabelle, ShrewsburyCampaign Slogan: Levelheaded LeadershipAlso running in her first political election, Ryan said her presence on the council with Braswell will allow for an efficient government, where more can be done than what is currently happening.“In the past, there seemed to be some friction on the board, which has hindered progress,” she said, adding “I can be aggressive, but I’m very pleasant to deal with.”Branching out from Braswell’s position on downtown flooding, Ryan said she plans to spotlight residential code enforcement. Simple things like property maintenance and ensuring homes are safe and attractive to the eye are important. It goes a long way if everyone is responsible for their properties, she said.“Yes, we want to keep this nice, small town atmosphere,” Ryan said. “But we need improvements.”Ryan and Braswell said they were on a Land Use Board subcommittee which selected a planner to investigate if Shadow Lawn Trailer Park could be deemed an “area in need of redevelopment.” The 14-acre site has nearly 100 residents leasing trailers, and is the last major developable piece of land in Highlands.Ryan said she wouldn’t want to see an equivalent to the neighboring EastPointe high-rise development, but said redevelopment could benefit Highlands sooner if shorter tax abatements are provided.“We would love to see more residents up there,” Ryan said. “I just don’t know how many units.”With experience on the local Board of Education, Ryan said bringing Sea Bright students to Henry Hudson would be a priority of hers. The high school is “a private school setting in a public school environment,” she said.Ryan said conversations over recent years have made the school district change for Sea Bright students a reality. Those students would travel less and be closer to home.“It’s something that I’ve supported from the beginning,” she added.last_img read more

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