One-stop mortgage shopping an opportunity for credit unions

first_imgby: Tandy VincentNationally recognized consumer advocate, Clark Howard, recently posted an article encouraging homebuyers to compare mortgages to ensure they get the best interest rate. Howard says “the difficulty of getting a mortgage has created a situation where people don’t even shop for a mortgage anymore. There’s no thought to even make a second phone call.”Unfortunately, Clark is right! According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau1 nearly half (47%) of Americans don’t shop for a mortgage. Instead, overwhelmed with the process of finding a home, they opt to talk to only one lender! It’s a financial mistake that can cost a homebuyer more than $25,000.2Credit unions can help. But how?As financial advocates, credit unions are uniquely positioned to help members make the right financial choices when it comes to financing a home. It’s kind of our thing.In service of that commitment, and in light of the CFPB findings, establishing first point of contact with home-buying members in the earliest stages of the process is where we should focus our attention. If we can get in front of buyers while they are just starting their home search and before they hire a Realtor, we’re in a prime position to become their real estate advocate and earn their mortgage business as a result. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Shoemaker sharp in first Razor Chassis South Central Region campaign

first_imgRazor Chassis South Central Region IMCA Modified rookie of the year Cody Shoemaker. (Photo by Mackensi Neighbors)PARADISE, Texas ­– Cody Shoemaker decided he wanted to try something different after five sea­sons in a Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMod.What he’ll try to decide next is where to display the trophy he received as rookie of the year in the Ra­zor Chassis South Central Region for Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds.“We had been in a SportMod for a few years and just wanted to try something different,” ex­plained the Paradise, Texas, pilot. “The Modified handles a lot different than a SportMod but it’s a lot of fun.”Shoemaker won three of 42 starts, taking the first checkers of his career in the class on March 26 at Kennedale Speedway Park.He was runner-up to regional king Matt Guillaume at Boyd Raceway and finished eighth in the points at KSP.“We ran with a lot of good guys, like Matt, Kevin Sustaire, William Gould and John Gober,” Shoe­maker said. “Our goal at the start of the season was to get some top 10’s or maybe some top five’s but we outran ‘em all a few times. That made us feel pretty good.”Shoemaker was a regular at both Boyd and KSP during his SportMod days. He made four treks to Grayson County Speedway before ending his first Modified season at 281 Speedway, the site of his first SportMod win in 2011.“I feel like if we’d figured out the dry slick sooner, we would have pulled off another win or two this year,” said Shoemaker, seventh in the regional standings,  “but we’re well satisfied with this year.”Starts: 42Wins: 3Additional Top Fives: 10 HIS CREW: Parents Jerry and Naomi; wife Brittan; daughter Blakleigh; and aunt Dee. HIS SPONSORS: Jerry’s Bit Service of Paradise; Mark Herring Race Engines of Plainview; and Affordable Water Well Service of Boonsville.last_img read more

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NCAA proposes to change shot clock from 35 to 30 seconds

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on May 15, 2015 at 1:59 pm Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesse After shortening the shot clock from 45 seconds to 35 before the 1993-94 season, the NCAA announced a proposal for the next reduction on Friday afternoon. The NCAA rules committee announced its vote on the change on Friday afternoon. All rules change proposals must be approved by Playing Rules Oversight Panel on June 8 before becoming official.In April, Rick Byrd, the chair of the NCAA rules of committee and Belmont’s head coach, told ESPN that the shot clock would “likely” move from 35 to 30 seconds. The NCAA has already experimented with using a 30-second shot clock in this year’s postseason National Invitation Tournament. Byrd added that the change would combat complaints about pace of play and low scoring that littered the game in the 2014-15 season, and that the collective opinion of coaches has started to call for the change. That is partially true for Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim, who was highly critical of the 35-second shot clock at Atlantic Coast Conference media day in October.Boeheim said that there’s no reason the shot clock — invented as a 24-second shot clock in Syracuse in 1954 — should be any longer than that. He went on to say that no “good offense” should need more than 24 seconds to score in college basketball, and his quick-shooting system mostly follows that logic. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange’s 2-3 zone also lulls teams into long possessions, and the 30-second clock can only benefit SU on the defensive end. On the same day that Boeheim cut up the 35-second shot clock, ACC commissioner John Swofford spoke of the conference’s initiative to have the shot clock reduced. “As we announced during our spring meetings last year, we will experiment with using a 30-second shot clock during exhibition games this fall,” Swofford said at media day in October. “The goal of the recommendation, which came from our coaches and was ratified by our athletic directors, was to see if this had the potential to increase the number of possessions and ultimately speed up the game. “And we look forward to sharing whatever experiences we have with that with the men’s basketball rules committee at the end of the season.”At 2 p.m. on Friday, Byrd will speak to the media via conference call to discuss the factors behind the latest shot-clock change. NCAA national coordinator of men’s basketball officiating J.D. Collins and NCAA vice president of men’s basketball Dan Gavitt will also be on the line. Commentslast_img read more

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