Howard Lake to talk on Internet fundraising in Dublin

first_img  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The event will take place on Thursday 26 May 2005 from 9:15am – 12:15pm at a central Dublin venue which will be confirmed shortly.The fee for EAPG/WheelMembers is ‚€65 and non-members ‚€95. Internet fundraising is 10 years old: what have we learned?who is raising funds, how and with whose help?what to focus on this year Howard Lake to talk on Internet fundraising in Dublin Howard Lake | 30 April 2005 | News Advertisementcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Digital UK Fundraising’s Howard Lake will present a half-day roundtable in Dublin on Internet fundraising on 26 May for the European Association for Planned Giving.At EAPG Ireland’s Dublin Roundtable Howard will lead an informal and interactive seminar entitled “Internet fundraising: what works and what doesn’t”.He will cover: About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Thursday September 19th Local Sports

first_imgMASON CITY — Both of NIACC’s cross country teams are in the initial junior college rankings released on Wednesday. The NIACC women are ranked ninth after placing sixth at the Luther College All-American Invitational last Saturday. Iowa Central is ranked first while El Paso Community College is ranked second. Iowa Community College Athletic Conference member Iowa Western is ranked seventh. The Lady Trojans are off until October 5th when they run at the University of Arkansas Chile Pepper Festival. The NIACC men are ranked 10th in the first poll of the season. Cloud County Community College of Kansas is ranked first while Central Arizona is second. Iowa Central is ranked third and Iowa Western is ranked fifth. The NIACC men run at the St. Olaf Invitational on Saturday. MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Held without a hit until the sixth inning, the Minnesota Twins managed only three in 3-1 loss to the Chicago White Sox that shrunk their AL Central lead. Minnesota is four games ahead of Cleveland after the Indians beat Detroit 2-1 in 10 innings. The surprising Twins still have a magic number of seven to clinch their first division title since 2010. AMES — Iowa State receiver Tarique Milton says the chemistry between the receivers and quarterback Brock Purdy was developed as soon as last season ended. Milton leads the Cyclones with eight receptions for 144 yards in their 1-1 start.Milton says they work hard on the timing of routes in practice.Iowa State wants to win the turnover battle this week against Louisiana-Monroe and safety Justin Bickham says the defense needs to do its part. The Cyclones had a couple of chances for interceptions in a loss to Iowa but could not come up with the ball.Bickham says they should be creating more turnovers.Kickoff on Saturday is scheduled for 11 o’clock MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota Lynx general manager and coach Cheryl Reeve is the WNBA basketball executive of the year. She directed the team to a ninth straight appearance in the playoffs despite losing several longtime stars. Reeve finished her second year as general manager. The Lynx finished 18-16 after the retirement of Lindsay Whalen, an indefinite hiatus for Maya Moore and the absence of injured Rebekkah Brunson. Minnesota lost to defending champion Seattle in the playoffs last week. CRESTON – The No. 19 NIACC volleyball team picked up a 25-10, 25-22, 25-14 sweep over Southwestern Community College on Wednesday in Iowa Community College Athletic Conference action.The Lady Trojans (14-4 overall, 2-1 in conference) were led by Becca Steffen, who recorded 18 assists, 13 digs and six kills.Kennedy Meister added 11 kills, five digs and two blocks, Megan Hollander had five blocks, Shelby Heston had seven digs, four kills and three blocks.Meanwhile, Alexa Loftus had seven kills and four digs, Bri Powers added eight digs, Kayla Lentz had four digs and three service aces and Tessa Sienknecht had five assists for NIACC, which travels to Marshalltown Community College on Friday.center_img IOWA CITY — Iowa defensive coordinator Phil Parker says the Hawkeyes are using their bye week to get better at limiting big plays. The Hawkeyes gave up two long pass plays for touchdowns in an 18-17 win at Iowa State.Parker says they need to do a better job communicating.Improved health would help their cause. Iowa was missing four defensive backs due to injury against ISU.The Hawkeyes return to action on September 28 by hosting Middle Tennessee State. MASON CITY – The No. 12 Marshalltown Community College men’s soccer team topped NIACC 6-2 in the Iowa Community College Athletic Conference opener for both teams Wednesday on the NIACC campus.Marshalltown led 3-1 at the half and outscored the Trojans 3-1 in the second half to improve its overall record to 6-1 overall.NIACC received a first-half goal from Aleksander Trujic with an assist from Ignacio Suarez Lampidis and a second-half goal from Luke McMahon with an assist from Ojo Otitolouwa. It was Trujic’s second goal of the season and first of the season for McMahon.NIACC (3-1 overall, 0-1 in conference) returns to action Saturday at Iowa Western. AMES — The Iowa and Iowa State athletic departments have issued a joint statement about “rude, vulgar and, in some cases, violent behavior” directed at the Hawkeye and Cyclone marching bands during their rivalry games.The statement indicated both the Hawkeye and Cyclone marching bands “have been the target of unacceptable behavior at football games” in Ames and Iowa City in recent years. The athletic directors said everyone should be embarrassed when students in the bands don’t feel safe when performing at an away game.The athletic directors said fans are “a significant part of the solution” by providing a “safe stage” for both bands inside the stadiums and showing respect to the musicians.On Monday, University of Iowa athletic director Gary Barta issued a written statement about “inappropriate actions” toward band members and staff during Saturday’s Iowa-Iowa State football game in Ames, indicating an investigation was underway.last_img read more

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Corning boys take soccer section title over Live Oak

first_imgCorning >> The Corning boys got a goal in the final 10 minutes of play Saturday afternoon to take a 1-0 win over Live Oak to win the Northern Section Division 2 championship. Freshman Ricky Guzman scored on a free kick in the 31st minute of the second half to give Corning the lead and the Cardinals held off a late charge from the Lions for the win.Guzman pushed an earlier shot just left off a penalty kick and had six shots on goal, leading the Cardinals.Live Oak had a chance to even it up in …last_img

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Is Scientism Ready for E.T.?

first_imgIn speculating about the impact of extraterrestrials on world religions, an author neglected the impact on his own.It was with apparent glee that Astrobiology Magazine and PhysOrg presented the views of David Weintraub, professor of astronomy at Vanderbilt University.  Weintraub just wrote a new book, Religions and Extraterrestrial Life: How Will We Deal With It?  In the book, which sports a cartoony drawing of the typical green small-bodied big-headed slanty-eyed alien of early TV sci-fi, Weintraub speculates on what impact the discovery of extraterrestrials might have on Muslims, Buddhists, Jews and Christians.  As every secular scientist knows, religious people rely on faith instead of science, so here’s a way to stick it to them.  The Astrobiology Magazine article includes a video clip of Weintraub summarizing his speculations.The only religions he sees having a problem with E.T. are Muslims and some Christians.  Muslims might have a problem figuring out how aliens would find Mecca to bow toward from millions of light years away.  Some evangelical Christians, Weintraub thinks, might be hardest hit:Evangelical and fundamental Christians are most likely to have difficulty accepting the discovery of extraterrestrial life, the astronomer’s research indicates. “…most evangelical and fundamentalist Christian leaders argue quite forcefully that the Bible makes clear that extraterrestrial life does not exist. From this perspective, the only living, God-worshipping beings in the entire universe are humans, created by God, who live on Earth.” Southern Baptist evangelist Billy Graham was a prominent exception who stated that he firmly believes “there are intelligent beings like us far away in space who worship God.”Actually, the Bible does not say anything about extraterrestrials specifically.  The evidence for human uniqueness is indirect; the Bible’s focus is on man, and God’s concern for people on Earth “since the foundation of the world.”  This has allowed a variety of positions, although the cosmic uniqueness of Christ’s death and resurrection seems to support human uniqueness.  Christians believe, however, in the omnipotence and omniscience of God; He can do whatever He wishes, and has not revealed everything to man.Weintraub thinks most people are not ready for the discovery of aliens; “very few among us have spent much time thinking hard about what actual knowledge about extraterrestrial life, whether viruses or single-celled creatures or bipeds piloting intergalactic spaceships, might mean for our personal beliefs [and] our relationships with the divine,” he says.  While he seems willing to consider the impact of aliens on mankind in general, he apparently neglected to consider the impact on scientism.Tell you what, David; we’ll think hard about it after you have some evidence for it.  How about that?  We could ask the same questions about other speculative matters: what would be the impact of the discovery of gnomes?  What would be the impact of the discovery of unicorns?  What if?  What if?  What if?  Irene Klotz on Live Science just gave an interesting excuse: “Aliens may be out there, but too distant for contact.” SETI hope, therefore, is pragmatically indistinguishable from belief in gnomes.  Come back when you have some data.Let’s turn the tables and think about the impact of aliens on scientism and evolutionism.  Suppose the first alien signal from another planet reads, “Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved.” WWDD?  (What would Dawkins do?)Actually, one could make that case; Jesus repeatedly said he was from above.  “My kingdom” He told Pilate, “is not of this world” (John 18:36).  Need extraterrestrials?  Try that One.  And how about the angels?  There is a rich tradition of eyewitness sightings of good and evil angels.  Does eyewitness testimony count?  Or does the only permissible evidence have to come via radio waves?  Actually, “angelology” is a significant sub-branch of systematic theology, with a lot of supporting textual evidence, even though it may seem “alien” to a materialist.While we’re what-iffing, what if aliens tell Weintraub that they exist and evolved by natural selection?  How would he know they are not lying?  How would he know they are even physical beings?  After all, Christians believe that demons are “deceiving spirits” that can appear in physical form or else take possession of humans, on occasion.  They are so good at deceit, in fact, that the book of Revelation predicts that the whole earth will follow after The Beast, believing in his promises of “peace and safety” (I Thessalonians 5).  The aliens to come will delight Weintraub with their manual, “How to serve man.”  Only when it’s too late will he find out the Twilight Zone punch line: “It’s a cookbook!”Actually, it would take far less to throw the religion of scientism into consternation.  If SETI succeeds, it will demonstrate that the fundamental principles of intelligent design are valid.  For one, it would show that purposeful signals can be distinguished from natural processes.  For another, it would demonstrate the identity of the messenger is a separate question from the identification of a message.  For a third, it would show that information is a fundamental property of the universe.  This would undermine materialism, because aliens would show by communicating with us that they understand the functional relevance of information.So we say, Weintraub and the SETI believers should hope that aliens are never found.  As long as they are absent, evolutionists are free to speculate and tell stories.   Once they show up, the problems for the religion of scientism will have just begun.In the meantime, the rest of us will respect evidence over imagination.  We will not waste time “thinking hard about” what might not even exist. 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9 months agoWolves boss Nuno: We’ll learn from Man City defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Wolves boss Nuno: We’ll learn from Man City defeatby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves boss Nuno insists there’s no reason for concern after their 3-0 defeat at Manchester City.The visitors were outclassed – especially after the dismissal of Willy Boly in the 19th minute.But Nuno reasoned, “We showed character, we were brave to stay in the game, always working hard, but we can’t stop all the chances for Man City.“We tried to have speed and to maintain the organisation, then play clearly on the counter attack.“You have to stay compact, knowing the result is going to be difficult. You have to work yourself until the end and my boys did it, so we must look ahead to the next challenge at home.”He continued: “We are learning every day, since last season. What we try is to concentrate on ourselves. We know that we must do better to compete against such a big and fantastic team.“There’s always a challenge for us. We can’t erase the game from our memories, but we’ll try because what is important is the next one.” last_img read more

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Jamaica’s First Inclusive Academy Opened

first_imgThe Ministry of Education, Youth and Information has partnered with the Rockhouse Foundation to establish Jamaica’s first public educational institution that will cater to students with and without disabilities.The Savanna-la-Mar Inclusive Infant Academy, based in Westmoreland, was formally opened by Portfolio Minister, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, on Wednesday (November 28).Senator Reid said the institution’s opening is timely, as it will meet the growing demand for the delivery of quality education to children with special needs“The inclusive model is in keeping with international standards and is a welcome addition to the education landscape in western Jamaica, especially here in Westmoreland, Savanna-la-Mar in particular, where service for children with special needs is extremely limited,” he stated.Senator Reid also underscored the importance of public-private partnerships that are aligned with the Ministry’s mandate, particularly in improving special education.“We believe that the Savanna-la-Mar Inclusive Infant Academy fits well with the aims and objectives of [the Ministry]. We know that not only will you cater to the academic development of children but [will] also provide related services, such as speech therapy, and physical therapy,” he said.The Minister explained that the inclusive model is designed to ensure that the needs of every child are catered to through a collaborative approach.“All children receive appropriate educational programmes [and] curricula relevant to their needs… . All children participate in co-curricular and extracurricular activities and benefit from cooperation, [and] collaboration among home, schools, and community,” he shared.In this regard, Senator Reid reaffirmed the Government’s commitment to the early childhood sector to provide all children, whatever their background, with a good foundation for their mental, physical and emotional development.For his part, Rockhouse Foundation President, Peter Rose, reiterated his commitment to continue working with the Ministry to develop other similar educational institutions across the island.“Our goal and aspiration… is for this to not be a one-of-a-kind institution in Jamaica, but to see others [established] across the island. Our goal is to be helpful to the Ministry in any way that we can.This kind of place sends such a strong signal, not just to the children and parents who are a part of this school family but to the wider community, the parish, [and] the region,” he said.Since its inception, the Foundation has spent close to US$5 million on educational endeavours in Jamaica.It has, to date, transformed and modernised five other institutions. They include the Moreland High, Primary and Infant Schools; Negril All-Age School; Negril Basic School; Little Bay All-Age and Infant School; and the Bunch of Stars Early Childhood institution.Additionally, the Foundation has renovated and expanded the Negril community library.last_img read more

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Kanesatake seeks to solidify Indigenous Treaty against Energy East with sacred items

first_img(Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon holds up a Haudenosaunee Wampum Belt. Photo/Tom Fennario)Julien Gignac APTN National NewsThe Mohawk community at the centre of the Oka Crisis is leading plans to hold a ceremony aimed at solidifying an Indigenous alliance against the proposed Energy East pipeline.Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon said the ceremony is expected to take place in British Columbia this coming spring.Simon said he first raised the idea of the alliance during a September Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs meeting. Simon said the “Indigenous Treaty” would create a “formal alliance between anyone who would be inclined to reject the pipeline proposals going through native territories.”Kanesatake was at the centre of the 1990 Oka Crisis triggered after the neighbouring village tried to bulldoze Mohawk burial grounds to expand a golf course.The primary goal of the treaty aims to limit the expansion of Alberta’s tar sands. Simon said the alliance would focus initially on stopping TransCanada’s proposed Energy East pipeline which would ship Alberta-mined bitumen to the East Coast.Kanesatake would be directly affected by TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline project if approved — a portion slicing straight through traditional hunting territory. The hunting grounds stretch almost 200 square miles to Sainte-Scholastique, Mirabel and all the surrounding areas, said Simon.The community is one of roughly 155 First Nations communities along the proposed path.The pipeline is projected to cost $12-billion and traverse 4,600 kilometres from Alberta to Irving oil facilities in Saint John, NB. The pipeline would transport about 1.1-million barrels of crude a day.Simon said the new treaty would include a traditionally-based Indigenous ceremony. He said the springtime event would feature the exchange of sacred objects to formalize it.The idea stemmed from discussions among chiefs in Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec, said Simon.Simon said the exchange objects would include a Haudenosaunee Wampum Belt, a Pacific Northwestern Totem Pole, and a mid-western Buffalo Robe. Simone said these objects represent elements inseparable from the cultural fabric of many First Nations people.These items have powerful meanings, pre-dating Canadian Confederation by centuries. Their presence is a ceremonial sign, commemorating kinship, honour, alliance, he said.“The Wampum Belt goes back thousands of years since the great law of the Iroquois, the great law of peace” said Simon. “It’s not only symbolic, it’s at the very heart of our identity as Iroquois people.”Made from white and purple beads, Wampum were inter-generational communication tools, documenting lineage. Wampum Belts were used as a formal means of establishing bonds between nations, legitimizing important events and upholding the promise of allegiance. They were also used during healing ceremonies.The Wampum Belt lies at the heart the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, consisting of the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas and the Tuscarora people.Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak decided to include the Buffalo Robe.“They had vision in their nation that someday the Buffalo Robe would come back over the mountain,” said Simon. “That means to them the robe would make it over the Rocky Mountains and into British Columbia.”Sundance Chief Rueben George of the Tsleil Waututh Nation in B.C. will contribute the Totem Pole, Simon said.Totem poles are traditionally used to honour ancestral ties and history, marking important turning points and milestones. They depict the crests of corresponding clans, commonly representing animals.“We bring these together and it’s the power and belief of all of these nations coming together under one treaty,” said Simon.It has the attention of others, too.B.C. Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, Grand Council of Treaty 3, encompassing First Nations communities in both Ontario and Manitoba, and chiefs from the Innu Nation are currently considering joining in solidarity.Kanesatake has a custom political system and does not fall under the scope of the Indian Act.“I can sign a treaty with whoever I choose,” said Simon. “It doesn’t matter what system I’m under. It would be hugely symbolic, but it would also help First Nations reconnect with their past and use it in the present context.”The approach is manifold.“We wish to work in collaboration,” according to a text of the proposed treaty obtained by APTN National News. “With all Canadians and all levels of government in creating a clean, just and sustainable economy, one that will both lead to healthier and more prosperous communities across Canada as well as preserve and protect our way of life.”Simon said governments and industry should take this treaty seriously.“It’s to safeguard our rights and to say no, free, prior and informed consent must be had,” said Simon. “If the industry, or the government, or both, decide to strong arm a First Nation who steadfastly says ‘no,’ then that First Nation can rest assured that they’re not alone.”Obtaining “free, prior and informed consent” from Indigenous people before development projects receive the go-ahead is incorporated into the United Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett has said Indigenous people in Canada will not be excluded from federal decisions that could objectify their land and inherent rights.Ottawa is now facing increased pressure to approve the Energy East pipeline following the rejection of TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline by the White House earlier this month.The Justin Trudeau government has openly admitted to “supporting” the Energy East project.TransCanada officials have said they consulted many First Nations and Metis communities along Energy East’s proposed route.“They (Indigenous people) need to be an integral part of everything we do at TransCanada,” said TransCanada spokesperson Mark Cooper. “So far along the project we’ve held 2,100 meetings with more than 180 aboriginal communities and organizations across Canada since 2013.”Forty-eight Metis and First Nations communities have accepted “Communications Engagement Funding Agreements,” said Cooper.These agreements involve money and allow the company to enter communities, give hold information sessions and note any concerns raised.“These dollars go to helping to provide and build the capacity within the First Nations communities to be able to provide input, attend meetings, to conduct their own studies, to meaningfully engage in the process so that we can collect the best information possible as it relates to the benefits and concerns of the pipeline” said Cooper.Impoverished First Nations are easily swayed when money is involved, said Simon.“Poverty is a hell of an incentive to sign on the dotted line,” he said.Kanesatake has received money from the energy firm, said Simon.In 2014, TransCanada cut a cheque to the community for $15,000 to conduct such a “capacity agreement,” he said.“They gave us the money with no questions asked,” he said. “There was no receipt, no accounting.”Simon told them to “get out” once the company started to ask about traditional knowledge, saying it followed too closely the types of questions asked during land claim settlements.“I don’t see the Crown anywhere in this process, the industry is the only one coming to talk to me and they’re asking me these questions that might prejudice my land claim,” said Simon. “That pipeline comes through and it’s basically a forced surrender of the land without the Crown being anywhere in sight.”The National Energy Board (NEB) is scheduling hearings allowing First Nations to voice their concerns, opinions and beliefs as they relate to Energy East.“Oral traditional evidence sessions are intended to help the NEB understand early on in the process how the Energy East Project may impact Aboriginal communities’ interests,” according to the NEB website. “For example, NEB expects to hear testimony about sacred sites, ceremonial sites, and traditional uses of the land and water in areas through which the proposed pipeline would pass.”Such a move is debatable to Simon, who believes the NEB and industry should be an arms-length away from each other.“What should have happened from the very beginning is the minister of Indian Affairs — with the mandate from the prime minister — going to each regional organization, like the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs,” he said. “You talk to them and start to hammer out a process of consultation, then you call in the industry.”TransCanada is one company pushing the idea that pipelines are the safest and most cost effective way to transport oil.“We recognize that these projects are the safest way to transport needed oil,” he said. “It’s the least greenhouse gas intensive way to transport and we have an extreme respect for the land the aboriginal communities along the route,” he said.Indications of potential risks associated with pipelines recently surfaced. In July, Nexen Energy made a public apology after one of its pipelines, south of Fort McMurray, Alta., burst, gushing five million litres of oil.In September, one of TransCanada’s natural gas pipelines exploded near Emerson, Man., sending apocalyptic flames and black smoke sky high. Two thirds of the proposed Energy East pipeline are to be converted from natural gas pipelines.“The spills are a lot worse than a tanker coming off the rails,” said Simon. “When they do burst, they burst, man, and you have major disasters on your hands.”Diane Beckett, Sierra Club Canada’s interim executive director, believes the oil should stay in the ground.“We’re being asked, ‘What poison do we want?’” she said. “The truth is when pipelines break, they’re huge oil spills.”Energy East will expand the amount of oil extracted, she said.“We don’t need new infrastructure to be put into an old dinosaur industry,” said Beckett. “We have to start putting the investments into green energy and energy conservation.”Beckett admires Simon in his attempt to unify Indigenous people across the country.“I’m very heartened that First Nations are saying no to energy infrastructure,” she said.Consultation with Indigenous people is embedded in the Canadian Constitution and industry along with government have historically ignored this, said Rodney Nelson, CEO of Global Governance Group, a policy think-tank with a focus on Indigenous issues.“Gearing together as a non-divisive force to put a stop to energy projects is an important position and a position that’s needed,” he said. “The Constitution is not an Indigenous law, it’s a Canadian law.”Simon believes it is time for Indigenous communities to act in unison.“They’ve had many years on their end to promote their project,” he said. “Now it’s our turn to speak.” [email protected]@JulienGignaclast_img read more

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Football Fourstar quarterback Jack Miller commits to Ohio State

Ohio State continued to add to its 2020 class Sunday after four-star quarterback Jack Miller committed to the Buckeyes. A Scottsdale, Arizona, native, Miller, the No. 47 overall recruit, is the No. 3 pro-style quarterback and the No. 3 recruit from the state according to the 247Sports composite rankings. According to Miller on Twitter, he had received several other scholarship offers, including offers from Michigan, Michigan State and Alabama.Miller is the fourth player to commit to Ohio State in the 2020 class. He will join five-star offensive lineman Paris Johnson Jr., four-star defensive back Lejond Cavazos and four-star offensive lineman Jake Wray in the recruiting class.

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This Startup Is Building a Tinder for Athletes

first_img A Miami-based startup is building a Tinder for athletic people.  Sportsbuddy’s first tagline read, “Play me, don’t date me.” That overtly flirtatious tone is echoed in a video introducing how the app works. In it, a group of very attractive girls and equally good looking guys come together, through the app, and play soccer together. It’s sweaty, and pretty sexy. The company’s new tagline is, “The game starts here.”Sportsbuddy is Tinder with a spin. Individuals are matched not only by geolocation, as with Tinder, but also by relative skill in a particular sport. “We create matches with a meaning,” says Jordan Silva Mishkin, the company’s director of business development. “I think it’s inevitable that people will use SportsBuddy as a way to meet other singles, but hopefully this way you’ll match with someone that you have something in common with and that will lead to a stronger human connection.”Related: 6 Dating Apps That Are Putting a Fresh Spin on Finding LoveIt sounds good. And it also makes sense. Full disclosure here, I was once upon a time a ballet dancer and am now a very dedicated Bikram yogi. Physical activity is a huge part of my life, and it’s pretty reasonable that I would be interested in a partner for whom that is also true. Lifestyle compatibility is important, which is why there are dating sites for every niche out there. (Consider: FarmersOnly is a thing.)Once you create a profile on the Sportsbuddy app, you pick the sport that you want to play and the “smart matching” technology will suggest potential partners for you to play with who are nearby and at your skill level. You also specify the gender, age and geolocation radius you want to search in. After inviting someone to play, for example, tennis, with you, you can chat within the app to coordinate. After each match, both players rate each other. Sportsbuddy keeps the ratings confidential but uses the information to better match people in the future.Related: Hinge, the Less Random Tinder, Raises $12 MillionCurrently, Sportsbuddy has seven sports categories: tennis, golf, soccer, yoga, running, basketball, gym and an “other” option. More categories are on the way, says Mishkin.In Florida, you can also browse through nearby group sports activities you can join or create your own event. An embedded directory of sports venues in the area helps event planners find a location. The event searching and planning features of the app will expand to the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, New York and Chicago later this summer.The app is free to use, and Sportsbuddy intends to keep it that way. The company has raised a $500,000 seed round so far and plans to seek more. Its plan is to make money by taking a commission from the event venues, instructors or classes that are booked on the platform. It also plans to charge those who want to advertise classes or events on the platform.Click to Enlarge+ Related: The Dating App That Refused Mark Cuban’s $30 Million Buyout Offer Just Raised $7.8 Million in Funding 3 min read Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img June 24, 2015 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more

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