Alaska climbs to third spot, denies Rain or Shine of twice-to-beat

first_imgUK plans Brexit celebrations but warns businesses may suffer Alaska’s victory also assured defending champion San Miguel of the twice-to-beat advantage in the playoffs.Vic Manuel came through in the clutch for the Aces, who played without Calvin Abueva and Carl Bryan Cruz, as his jumper gave Alaska a 96-95 lead with 39 seconds left in the game.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkJVee Casio and Kevin Racal then iced the game from the free throw line.Alaska head coach Alex Compton was in awe of how his team delivered under duress especially when Maverick Ahanmisi and James Yap combined their efforts to bring Rain or Shine back in the game. Manuel and Racala also filled up the scoring column for the Aces with 14 and 13 points, respectively, while Sonny Thoss and Simon Enciso had 10 points apiece.Ahanmisi led the Elasto Painters with 23 points, five rebounds, five assists, and five steals while Yap added 17 points.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed After shrugging off jitters, Kai Sotto unleashes strength LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Sea turtle trapped in net freed in Legazpi City Vic Manuel. PBA IMAGESAlaska ground it out and frustrated Rain or Shine, 99-95, to reach the third spot in the 2018 PBA Philippine Cup Friday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.The Aces improved to 7-4, half-a-game behind no.2 Magnolia, after snapping their two-game losing streak and denying the Elasto Painters, who skidded to 5-4,  a chance for a twice-to-beat advantage come the quarterfinals.ADVERTISEMENT Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano MOST READ It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “What a game, awesome game,” said Compton. “Maverick Ahanmisi gave me about 800 new gray hairs there in the fourth quarter. I don’t know how many points he had but he hit three threes and a three-point play. He really helped bring them back and it was huge. James had been playing great.”“I just really appreciate the efforts of our guys to weather the storm and keep coming.”Alaska held an 83-75 lead at the 8:03 mark of the fourth before Ahanmisi displayed his marksmanship.Ahanmisi had 15 points in Rain or Shine’s blistering 20-9 run in the fourth that Yap capped off with a jumper to give the Elasto Painters a 95-94 edge with 1:30 remaining.Casio came up with 22 points, 10 rebounds, and 10 assists to lead Alaska while rookie Jeron Teng and Marlon Magat both had 14 points.ADVERTISEMENT GALLERY: Barangay Ginebra back as PBA Governors’ Cup kings Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano View commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Listen More Closely to Africa’s Voice on Climate Change

first_imgAs more than 120 world leaders converge on New York this week for an unprecedented UN climate summit, one highly significant voice needs to be heard.  That voice belongs to Africa. In all the global discussions around rising sea levels, shrinking rain forests, imperiled species and biodiversity, green bonds and carbon prices, Africa’s unique stake and contribution to a global climate strategy needs to be more front and center. This is only right for a continent that has contributed the least to the profound changes underway in the Earth’s climate but whose people will suffer its withering impact the most.Consider that Africa is responsible for only 3.8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions yet from the Sahel to the Horn of Africa to the south of the continent, African countries experience first-hand the devastating effects of increasingly severe droughts and floods and more extreme weather patterns that scorch or drown their crops. Africa’s political and business leaders are already committed to a climate-resilient growth path, yet the path promises to be bumpy. Recent World Bank research outlines a disturbing scenario for Sub-Saharan Africa in a 2°C warmer world, forecasting dramatic effects on agriculture and food production in a region where 80 percent of Africans rely on agriculture to make ends meet for their families. Consequently, we cannot separate agriculture and food security from climate change. Agriculture in Africa accounts for 30-40 percent of GDP. A 1.5°C to 2°C increase in temperature by the 2030s and 2040s will lead to a 40- to 80-percent reduction in the area of land suitable for growing maize, millet and sorghum. These cereals are the mainstay of African diets. They provide the bulk of people’s daily food intake especially in the drylands of the Sahel and the Horn of Africa. We must also amplify the links between climate change and conflict. In a groundbreaking 2013 paper published in Science magazine, economists Solomon Hsiang, Marshall Burke, and Edward Miguel argued that there is strong evidence linking climatic events to human conflict in Africa and across all other major regions of the world. The magnitude of climate change is substantial they wrote: for each one standard deviation change in climate toward warmer temperatures or more extreme rainfall, median estimates indicate that the frequency of interpersonal violence rises 4% and the frequency of intergroup conflict rises 14%.Africa’s harsher climate of the future will also change traditional livelihoods. As temperatures rise, Africa’s iconic savanna grasslands will dry up and threaten the livelihoods of their pastoral communities. Given the sensitivity of livestock—their goats, cows, and other animals—to extreme heat, too little water and feed, and disease, pastoralism as a centuries-old way of life is likely to be in danger.Rainfall patterns will dramatically change; droughts and floods will be more frequent and lead to a 3-percent expansion in total arid areas. Coastal populations in Guinea-Bissau, Gambia and Mozambique would face the greatest risk of inundation and storm surges. Coastal erosion represents a major threat as a large part of Africa’s GDP derives from activities such as fishing, tourism and trade.  Entire cities and villages along the coast – capital cities and crucial deep-sea ports — could be wiped out due to rising sea-levels. Countries such as Togo, Ghana and Mozambique could lose more than 50 percent of their coastal GDP, according to recent estimates. Sustainable management of the region’s rich natural resources—forests, water, land—can contribute to the storage of carbon, while supporting livelihoods and generating economic benefits. Madagascar, one of the poorest countries in the world, also harbors 5 percent of the world’s known biodiversity. Before the country’s political crisis, nature-based tourism was a $500-million industry, growing at 10 percent per year. But the island is also on the list of the most climate change-vulnerable countries which will have a significant impact on its biodiversity.Africa is one of the world’s fastest-urbanizing continents. Parched rural hinterlands will steadily force people to move to already-crowded cities, creating overcrowding, stressing supplies of safe drinking water and drainage and sanitation.At the African Union Summit in Malabo, last June, Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete reminded his audience that the “effects of climate change are likely to strike to the detriment of the whole continent”.  He added that Africa now requires in excess of US$15 billion per year to combat climate change, a figure that continues to rise.The good news is that Africa is uniquely well positioned to build resilience, especially in energy and agriculture, and has already embraced sustainability. Being green is good for business. In Kenya, small farmers are now earning carbon credits from sustainable farming. In South Africa, the city of Johannesburg recently issued its first green city bond to finance low-carbon infrastructure. In Mauritania, solar energy now powers 30 percent of Nouakchott’s energy use. In Africa, wind and solar potential can be over 1,000 GW but needs to be fully exploited. The continent has embarked on a clean power revolution that brings more electricity to people’s homes, businesses, clinics and schools. With only one in three Africans having access to energy, the task is urgent.  Africa has tremendous untapped hydro, geothermal, and solar power and must be developed to provide the electricity needed to offer sustained – and green – growth for the benefit of all its citizens.The World Bank is stepping up to the challenge.  We are financing transformational projects that attack poverty from multiple angles. We are supporting governments to promote “climate-smart agriculture” so that African farmers can achieve higher yields and make their farming more resilient to the changing climate.  In DRC, a $73.1-million technical assistance project will pave the way to bring hydroelectric power to 9 million people. These interventions are just a starting point – not nearly enough to address the monumental energy needs of the continent.  Though prices for renewables have declined significantly in the past decade, these energy sources are still costly.  The green energy revolution in African cannot be achieved without financial support of the international community, to bring down the costs of adopting these clean technologies.    The warning signs are clear: climate change under even the 2°C scenario is a menacing threat to sustainable development in Africa. These impacts could potentially overwhelm existing development efforts. We ignore the early warning signs at our collective peril. But, through collective action, we can ensure a climate-resilient future that benefits all Africans and the entire planet.Makhtar Diop is the World Bank Vice President for the Africa RegionShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More →

Raiders deal Amari Cooper to Cowboys for first-round pick

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceALAMEDA — It happened early in practice Monday, with a member of the Raiders’ support staff coming out to escort Amari Cooper off the practice field.“They be calling him the grim reaper,” running back Jalen Richard said. “He just came and grabbed him.”The Dallas Cowboys offered a first-round draft pick in 2019, and the Raiders ended a week’s worth of rumors and intrigue by trading a receiver coach Jon Gruden had …last_img

Read More →

Pay Wallet: salaries to your mobile

first_imgThe solution caters for any disbursements which previously relied on cash or cheque payments; and clients also have the option of providing recipients with a Pay Wallet card, which can be used at any ATM and for cash back or purchases at point of sale. “Pay Wallet will reduce our clients’ risk of theft and fraud as well as the cost and inconvenience associated with handling cash,” said FNB Commercial’s head of sales and client relationships, Michael Vacy-Lyle. According to 2009 FinScope research, South Africa has more than 27-million economically active individuals, 37% of whome do not have bank accounts. “Pay Wallet is yet another innovative solution from FNB ensuring that all South Africans are active participants in the growth of our economy,” FNB Smart Services CEO Yolande van Wyk said in a statement this week.” Safe, affordable, convenient “Our solution provides employees who do not own a bank account, the opportunity of being able to receive their funds instantaneously and electronically,” said Van Wyk. “FNB’s focus on innovation has created the ability for our clients to conduct their financial matters safely and securely, and far more conveniently.” According to FNB, the Pay Wallet offers its corporate, commercial and public sector clients safety, affordability and convenience by allowing them to electronically pay their employees’ salaries. According to Vacy-Lyle, clients will also have the ability to “sponsor” up to two cash withdrawals for the recipient in order to further reduce costs for employees. First National Bank is set to launch a new solution enabling employers to pay the workers without bank accounts via their mobile phones, giving them immediate access to their salaries via the bank’s ATMs – without needing bank cards or accounts. 27 July 2010 “Through our commitment to entrepreneurship and enabling businesses to manage their cash flow effectively, we focus on innovation as a key driver in making banking more affordable, accessible and convenient to our clients – saving them time and money,” he said. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material “By accessing a specifically developed portal on FNB Online Banking, clients will have the ability to create and pay wallet holders in real-time, and wallet holders will have immediate access to their money by withdrawing cash at an FNB ATM.” “It affords those with no access to banking services to be paid electronically without the need of a bank account.” Focus on innovationlast_img read more

Read More →

Minibus therapy takes life skills counselling on the road

first_imgInnovative psychologist Banetsi Mphunga campaigns to break the stigma around mental health issues and take the anxiety out of therapy using a minibus taxi as a mobile treatment clinic in Cape Town townships.The people’s psychologist Banetsi Mphunga and his Volkswagen Caravelle minibus from which he offers free therapy sessions to people in Khayelitsha and further afield. (Image: Twitter)CD AndersonWhile Mphunga still maintains an office-bound practice at the Township Parents and Children Counselling Centre in Khayelitsha, the majority of his time is spent on the road, driving a minibus mobile clinic that offers free counselling sessions and life skills guidance to young people in the area.He started the idea in 2015, inspired by his work in youth development programmes. He had noticed that a lot of the youth he spoke to were too afraid to discuss their problems in a formal counselling session, in an unfamiliar environment.In the informal, more relaxed interior of the minibus, patients didn’t need to feel intimidated or claustrophobic, Mphunga told the Daily Vox website.He calls his facility an “emotional ambulance”, and while most cases he deals with are relaxed and constructive, there are times when he is called into action quickly and aggressively: more often than not when drugs and physical abuse are involved.He sees his ultimate aim as a people’s therapist to end the drug and alcohol cycle that is the starting-point of many mental health issues in young people.And he will go anywhere, at any time of the day, to fulfil that promise. “What I hope for them, is to show them despite whatever situation they have been going through, they can still make it,” Mphunga told the Daily Vox.While his work is focused primarily in Khayelitsha, the mobile clinic – a second-hand Volkswagen Caravelle with tinted windows to secure confidentiality – enables him to spread his work to surrounding areas, particularly in the rural farming areas in towns as far as Robertson and Malmesbury.It also allows him to meet teachers, priests and community leaders on their home turf, and offer advice on how to identify and best resolve issues such as depression, anxiety and anti-social behaviour in children.Mphunga also offers trauma counselling for the elderly, a section of the community often forgotten when it comes to mental health. Most of the time, old people just want someone to talk to and listen to their problems, Mphunga says, but sometimes there are more serious unresolved issues that can be addressed in sessions.Community response to Mphunga’s minibus therapy has been positive. While he understands he may not be able to cover all the bases for effective long-term therapy, he is confident that making people comfortable with the idea of talking about their problems in a spacious, non-threatening environment will help them seek out more regular, more effective counselling.He is currently crowdfunding for ongoing maintenance improvements for his minibus, as well as raising funds for youth-oriented development programmes in his community, through a GoFundMe page, which you can visit here. Source: News24, Daily Vox, The Good Things GuyWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Read More →

FitExpo 2017 to impart fitness mantra in people

first_imgKolkata, July 17 (PTI) The biggest Fitness and Wellness Festival of Eastern India will take place in November this year.International Zumba Education Specialist from US, Maria Browning said at a press meet yesterday, “It?s a great platform which brings together so many people and institutions who are working towards building a healthier future.?FitExpo 2017 Chief Convenor Gagan Sachdev said, “The meet, which we aim to match the size of Kolkata Boimela or even bigger, would impart sports and fitness mantra into every one?s lifestyle, promote talent and also recognise those who have contributed towards this industry.””The FitExpo 2017, to be held on November 11 and 12 at Milan mela grounds, would bring together thousands of fitness enthusiasts apart from stakeholders,” he said.They hail from as divergent fields as fitness trainers, bodybuilders, health clubs, martial art academies, personal trainers, group fitness instructors, zumba and salsa exponents, athletes, physiotherapists, sports medicine experts, spas, beauty therapists etc.The press meet preceded the curtain raiser as two internationally known Zumba dancers swayed to the beats.The FitExpo 2017 will have workshops, seminars, live shows and various competitions. PTI SUS MDlast_img read more

Read More →

a month agoMan City boss Guardiola: Otamendi and Fernandinho too old for regular football

first_imgMan City boss Guardiola: Otamendi and Fernandinho too old for regular footballby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola says Fernandinho and Nicolas Otamendi are too old to play every game.Otamendi is the only healthy natural centre-back in the squad meaning Fernandinho, a regular midfielder, started in Wednesday’s 3-0 win over Shakhtar Donetsk.But Guardiola says because of their age he will have to call upon Kyle Walker and Rodri to play minutes at centre-back.”I didn’t have doubts [Fernandinho] could do it,” Guardiola said after City’s win on Wednesday. “Nico is 31, Fernandinho is 34 and the next alternative (Eric Garcia) is 18. For three or four months I don’t know what will happen.”Both were incredible tonight. Nico showed incredible personality after what happened in the previous game.”We need another solution — Rodri or Kyle Walker maybe — because they cannot play every game at their age.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

Christopher Walken Speaks Up For Animals

first_imgChristopher Walken is speaking up for urban wildlife in a new video for The Humane Society of the United States.Video: Christopher Walken Speaks Up for WildlifeWhen coyotes, raccoons, or other urban wildlife get too close to our communities they are often perceived as nuisances. Instead of killing urban wildlife, HSUS hopes people will consider more humane and effective alternatives. They have a very useful tool on their website that can let people choose which urban animal is causing them issues before leading them to a page with humane solutions.last_img

Read More →

Mens hockey set to start season with young roster

The Ohio State men’s hockey team only has a single senior on their roster opening the 2009 campaign, but a core of juniors and sophomores should help stop talk of 2009 being a rebuilding season. Despite losing their leading scorer, Corey Elkins, all but one of their 15 highest point scorers from last season are returning.The 12 juniors and seven sophomores look to build off of last season’s 23-15-4 overall record and 13-11-4 conference record. Their premature exit from the NCAA tournament last year should put an extra fire under the experienced Buckeyes.A stepping-stone season    Looking back on last season, head coach John Markell said he believes that the previous year was a great stepping stone season for his team.“We were very close to being a top four team in this league,” Markell said. “With the youth we had, I like the strides we made. I think we established some positions. Our goal tending and defense were solid and we were a good goal tending team.”Last season, the team started off to an adequate 3-5-1, but a 13-game unbeaten streak midway through the season brought them into national contention. The streak was a symbol of consistency, something that Markell is preaching to his team this season.  Their successful season ended in disappointment with a loss, 8-3, to No. 1 Boston College in the first round of the NCAA tournament. “They took the loss the right way and really worked this summer,” Markell said. “I’m waiting to see what that gives them.”Progressing toward this season, Markell said he wants to improve on a few aspects of his team from last season.“The concerns I have for this team is that our power play has to work better if we are going to make even greater strides,” he said. “We need to get a guy on the anchor of our power play and we also have to defend a little better.”Filling the gapsMarkell knows he lost three talented seniors this season, but he believes his team can fill in the gaps.“We lost Corey Elkins, physical players Nick Biondo and Zach Pelletier, that we are going to have to replace,” he said. “We have all the makings with our junior and sophomore classes. The character that we added with our freshman class can fill the holes.”Dustin Carlson, the starting goaltender and a member of this year’s talented junior class, said he believes that this year the team can make great strides with their experienced returning players.“I think we are going to perform a lot better than last year,” Carlson said. “We have a huge returning class and pretty much everyone started.”Carlson said he also believes that even though Elkins was such an important component of last season’s team, someone could easily fill his role.“I definitely think someone is going to step up and fill his shoes for sure,” he said. “We have a lot of depth in scoring and I think everyone is going to step up again.”Junior forward Peter Boyd agreed with Carlson’s assessment.“There’s quite a few guys that can put the puck in the back of the net,” Boyd said. “Corey was a good player obviously, but I definitely think there are guys that can fill into that role.”Other notable returning starters are junior forwards John Albert and Sergio Somma. Albert, who was only two points away from being last year’s lead scorer, looks to improve on his 39 point total and 11 goals. Two sophomores who look to build upon their successful first seasons are forwards Zac Dalpe and Ian Boots.Carlson will return as the team’s starting goalie this season where he posted a 21-12-3 record and allowed only 2.5 goals per game.“Taking it in small blocks”Looking to the upcoming season, Markell said he could not wait to start.“I love the character of our young freshmen,” he said. “Our nucleus is sophomores and juniors, and if they are tight-knit it could take you a long way. They feel like a family and they are playing for each other.”The Buckeyes will face tough opponents this season such as Notre Dame, Miami University and Michigan, but Markell is not focused on any particular opponent.“In college hockey the parity is unbelievable,” he said. “There’s 58 Division 1 hockey teams and everybody can beat everyone. You have to be prepared to play each and every game.”Carlson also believes in the parity theory emphasized by his head coach.“Obviously we want to beat the big teams like Michigan and Miami,” he said. “But we can’t overlook anyone at all. We need every game this year. [We need to] just take it in small blocks a weekend every time. We are looking for consistency and a 20-win season that I think we are capable in having.”OSU kicks off the season with a game at home against Western Ontario Sunday at noon. [email protected] read more

Read More →