Hughes sets tone in exhibition with 10 steals

first_imgSenior guard Trevon Hughes had 10 steals as the Badgers dominated UW-Superior, 80-47 last night.[/media-credit]Basketball is a simple game when your starting guards average 14 assists to just three turnovers per game.After an impressive opener in which seniors Trevon Hughes and Jason Bohannon tallied 13 assists and four turnovers, the backcourt duo one-upped themselves Wednesday night.Bohannon scored 14 points to go along with six assists, four steals and just two turnovers. But it was Hughes who really stole the show.The 6-foot guard from Queens, N.Y., controlled the game for the Badgers, putting up nine points while dishing out nine assists and recording 10 steals. More importantly, though, Hughes did not turn the ball over against UW-Superior.“He proved why he’s one of the better point guards in the nation,” UW-Superior head coach Logan Flora said. “He was very good; he locked up our point guard who I feel has held his own against Division I players in the past.”One reason for Hughes’ and Bohannon’s play has been relentless effort from start to finish in each of the Badgers’ first two games. If you ask head coach Bo Ryan, he would tell you that’s the only way to play the game.According to Hughes, though, it has a lot to do with the makeup of this year’s team as well.With the ability of the Badgers to score from deep and in the paint, Hughes and Bohannon have found a lot of open targets to the feed the ball to, both inside and outside.“Just having shooters on the court with me to open up the court when I get to the lane makes things a whole lot easier,” Hughes said. “And their guys on the wing have to help and collapse because there’s no easy buckets, so I just kick it out and I get most of my assists from there in the transition game this year.”According to junior forward Jon Leuer, the Badgers have put a lot of emphasis on pushing the ball in transition during the offseason, something that was not necessarily one of their strong points a year ago.“That’s definitely something that’s going to be one of our strengths this year,” Leuer said. “That’s one of the things we’re trying to focus on is just trying to beat your man down the court, because you can obviously get easy points that way.”Badgers sign three for 2010 classBefore Wisconsin took the court Wednesday night, the Badgers announced the addition of three players to their 2010 recruiting class: Evan Anderson, Josh Gasser and Duje Dukan.When asked about the three following the Badgers’ victory over UW-Superior, Ryan admitted he was excited about the signing.“We’re ecstatic,” he said. “They’re basketball players.”Anderson, a 6-foot-11-inch, 240-pound center from Eau Claire, Wis., is a big guy who Ryan said is better moving his feet now than he was when they began recruiting him two years ago.Despite an injury-shortened junior season, Anderson earned all-state honorable mention honors from the Associated Press after averaging eight points and six rebounds per game.As a sophomore, he was named to the second-team All-Cloverbelt Conference and as a freshman, Anderson set the school single-season record at Stanley-Boyd High School with 98 blocks.“He was hedging screens this summer in Vegas,” Ryan said. “I was so happy that he got healthy.”Gasser, a 6-foot-4-inch, 190-pound guard from Port Washington, Wis., is another guy who Ryan has seen a lot of improvement in over his three years at Port Washington High School.He averaged 22 points, 11 rebounds and three assists per game last season as a junior, en route to being named conference MVP.According to Ryan, Gasser is an excellent all-around player, as evidenced by the fact he already is Port Washington’s all-time leading scorer and rebounder after just three years.“Josh can see the floor, he can shoot it, he can put it on the floor and he can defend,” Ryan said. “And he’s just one of those guys that just plays. He wasn’t looking to find out where he was ranked. … He’s just (thinking), ‘Hey, I want to be a Badger.’ ‘OK, Josh, let’s go.”Finally, Dukan, a 6-foot-8-inch, 190-pound forward from Deerfield, Ill., is the son of Ivica Dukan, who played professional basketball in Europe for 15 years and is the current director of international scouting for the Chicago Bulls.Dukan averaged 16 points and eight rebounds per game last season, earning All-Central Suburban League honors. He also is a player Ryan has high hopes for when he joins UW.“The sky could be the limit for him,” Ryan said. “He plays basketball against some of the best players around every summer. … He’s been exposed to a lot of things basketball-wise.”last_img read more

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Walks costly for Dodgers in loss to gaining Diamondbacks

first_imgLOS ANGELES >> The Dodgers found a new way to lose Tuesday.For a team that has lost 10 of its past 11 games, it was no small feat.In the 10th inning of a tie game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Dodgers pitcher Pedro Baez walked the first two batters he faced. Both scored when third baseman Justin Turner threw to the plate for a likely out, only to watch his throw carom off the glove of catcher Yasmani Grandal.The fateful error capped a 3-1 loss, and represented a cruel twist of fate for Grandal. His fifth-inning home run dashed Zack Greinke’s bid for a no-hitter and a shutout, and proved to be the Dodgers’ only run of the game. During their current 12-game winning streak, the Diamondbacks have gained 9 1/2 games on the first-place Dodgers in the National League West standings. The Dodgers’ only win during that time? A 1-0 nail-biter in San Diego in which Clayton Kershaw pitched flawlessly.Pitching wasn’t the problem Tuesday.Dodgers manager Dave Roberts insisted he didn’t need starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu to be perfect. He merely wanted Ryu to return to form – six runs allowed in his first six starts following the All-Star break – after getting shelled for six runs in four innings Aug. 30 in Phoenix.Ryu did just that. The left-hander allowed only one run in six innings, pitching well enough to leave the game tied at 1. He walked five batters but struck out seven and benefitted from a double play on a comebacker to the pitcher’s mound.Ross Stripling pitched two scoreless innings in relief of Ryu. Kenley Jansen pitched around a couple baserunners in the top of the ninth inning. In the bottom of the ninth inning, the Dodgers wasted a leadoff single by Chris Taylor, who was thrown out trying to advance to second base on a deep fly ball. That set the stage for Baez (3-4), who has allowed seven runs in three September appearances while recording only two outs.Baez walked Chris Iannetta and A.J. Pollock to begin the 10th inning. Left-hander Tony Watson was warming up in the bullpen when Roberts emerged from the dugout to visit the mound, but the manager elected to leave Baez in the game.Chris Herrmann pinch-ran for Iannetta, and both runners moved up on a J.D. Martinez groundout. When Brandon Drury bounced a ground ball to third base, Turner’s best chance at an out was to throw home to retire Herrmann. His throw was on target but Grandal – blinded by Herrmann, perhaps – couldn’t close his mitt on the baseball.Watson relieved Baez and finished the inning, but the damage was done. Fernando Rodney pitched a scoreless 10th inning, allowing only a pinch-hit single to Corey Seager, to end the game.Since they matched their 2016 win total on Aug. 25, the Dodgers are 1-10 and have been outscored 62 to 26. Five of those losses have come at the hands of the Diamondbacks.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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The Chelsea v Nordsjaelland quiz

first_imgTest your knowledge by seeing how many of these five questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-91]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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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When Data Doesn’t Fit the Consensus

first_imgLike evolutionists, climate scientists have ways of oversimplifying or neglecting inputs that could challenge their paradigm.Models for climate change must deal with numerous factors, some independent, some overlapping with other factors in complex feedback loops. It’s impossible to get everything in line for a political sound bite, as the examples below illustrate. Major input estimates can be way off. Whether the factors listed here help or hurt the consensus view on anthropogenic climate change is less important than the question: what other factors are being overlooked or wrongly estimated? What are the unknown unknowns? (See also 9/19/16, “Climate is not clear for change”).Estimates on glacial erosion rates were biased. Science Magazine reports that systematic biases are calling into question estimates of erosion rates in glaciated environments:Deciphering erosion rates over geologic time is fundamental for understanding the interplay between climate, tectonic, and erosional processes. Existing techniques integrate erosion over different time scales, and direct comparison of such rates is routinely done in earth science. On the basis of a global compilation, we show that erosion rate estimates in glaciated landscapes may be affected by a systematic averaging bias that produces higher estimated erosion rates toward the present, which do not reflect straightforward changes in erosion rates through time.Don’t forget the aerosols. Small particles affect cloud condensation, which in turn affect climate by “substantially” influencing the reflectivity of the earth. Scientists reporting in PNAS that researchers may have wrongly estimated the contribution of multiphase dimethyl sulfide (DMS) on cloud formation.Climate models indicate the importance of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) oxidation in new aerosol particle formation and the activation of cloud condensation nuclei over oceans. These effects contribute to strong natural negative radiative forcing and substantially influence the Earth’s climate. However, the DMS oxidation pathway is not well-represented, because earlier model studies only parameterized gas-phase DMS oxidation and neglected multiphase chemistry. Here, we performed the most comprehensive current mechanistic studies on multiphase DMS oxidation. The studies imply that neglecting multiphase chemistry leads to significant overestimation of SO2 production and subsequent new particle formation. These findings show that an advanced treatment of multiphase DMS chemistry is necessary to improve marine atmospheric chemistry and climate model predictions. How much carbon can the soil hold? Another input is being revised. Estimates of soil carbon sequestration are in need of revision, a paper in Science Magazine says:Soil is the largest terrestrial carbon reservoir and may influence the sign and magnitude of carbon cycle–climate feedbacks. Many Earth system models (ESMs) estimate a significant soil carbon sink by 2100, yet the underlying carbon dynamics determining this response have not been systematically tested against observations. We used 14C data from 157 globally distributed soil profiles sampled to 1-meter depth to show that ESMs underestimated the mean age of soil carbon by a factor of more than six (430 ± 50 years versus 3100 ± 1800 years). Consequently, ESMs overestimated the carbon sequestration potential of soils by a factor of nearly two (40 ± 27%). These inconsistencies suggest that ESMs must better represent carbon stabilization processes and the turnover time of slow and passive reservoirs when simulating future atmospheric carbon dioxide dynamics.An editorial in Nature takes a peek into the sociology of climate science. Are political conclusions rushing ahead of good observational science? The editors advise, “The maximum climate ambition needs a firm research backing,” implying that firm research backing is lacking. The editors discuss how the fix on the 2-degree target overlooks a different, lower target that may or may not be practical. “We need to know what the 1.5 °C warming target will involve — even if we don’t reach it,” they say. Deadlines, meetings, and conferences put pressure on these arbitrary targets, showing that scientists do not necessarily calmly assess data in a dispassionate manner. They have to meet the IPCC deadlines. Could this reduce the reliability of their published results? You can’t always rush a conclusion requiring lots of data, measurement, and analysis.Unless the politics swirling around energy and climate policy change dramatically, the targets are clearly out of reach, but that does not mean that the IPCC’s latest research exercise is a waste of time. Regardless of any particular political target, the work can shed light on what deep decarbonization might mean for both human societies and the natural environment. That is information that policy­makers — particularly those pushing for aggressive action — can use. Each solution comes with its own challenges: technical, ethical, social and political. So much for disinterested science. This is a hotbed of social and political forces that apparently want data that supports their own talking points.Geoff Cumming explains one reason so many scientific studies may be wrong: misuse of statistics. Writing for The Conversation, he discusses p-hacking and other errors that have put science into a “reproducibility crisis” invading even the top research journals. While not specifically addressing climate science, he gives this humorous caution that applies to all research: “Statisticians have a saying: if you torture the data enough, they will confess.”Science cannot be understood outside of its social, historical and worldview context. Some areas of science, being apolitical, are less vulnerable to those forces than others: who cares how many electrons are found to exist in a particular element’s inner shell? You can repeat some experiments over and over. But climate science is very political, very complex, and non-repeatable. So is evolutionary theory. That makes both of them hotbeds of social, political and worldview influences on the way the members of the guild behave. The more a science becomes political, the more citizens should be wary of its advocates’ strong pronouncements.You can tell when a consensus is weak. They call their opponents crazy. Science Daily reports on psychologists who think they have figured out “The psychology behind climate change denial.” We retort with, “The theology behind calling others crazy.” It’s also known as the fallenness of human nature.(Visited 76 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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TCIG to dole out dollars for emergency and replacement equipment

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, July 7, 2017 – Grand Turk – Cabinet meeting revealed that government is prepared to buy special equipment for the Ministry of Finance and replacement equipment for the DDME.   Governor Dr. John Freeman in the meeting last Friday was advised that he should approve funding for the purchase of two generators and two mobile satellite internet systems to enable the Ministry of Finance to continue to operate in critical areas of business in the event of a disaster.His Excellency the Governor was also advised to approve emergency funding for the replacement of equipment stolen from the Department of Disaster Management and Emergencies (DDME).   In a theft Minister Delroy Williams labeled, ‘disheartening and outrageous’; the crooks got away with Digicel smart phones, radios, CPUs, computer monitors, 60” smart TV and satellite phones.The items were called critical to the full and proper functioning of the DDME, especially during the hurricane season which runs June 1st through November 30th.#MagneticMediaNews#DDME#newemergencyequipmentforDDME Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #newemergencyequipmentforDDME, DDME TCI: More active Hurricane Season predicted and DDME gives thorough update on its readiness Turks and Caicos is first to add Disaster Management to the Tourism portfolio TCI: Hard-working DDME lauded as Hurricane Preparedness Month officially openedlast_img read more

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Firefighters douse blaze at house under construction

first_imgFirefighters quickly extinguished a small blaze at a house under construction that was the spot of a fire three years ago.Smoke and flames were reported at 6:41 a.m. Thursday at 39812 N.E. 94th Ave. northeast of La Center.Firefighters from Clark County Fire District 10 arrived and put out the fire within minutes, Battalion Chief Gordon Brooks said.The fire was contained to the floor of one room, Brooks said, so damage was minimal.There was a fire at the address three years ago and the owner, who lives in a trailer on the property, was rebuilding on the site, Brooks said.Clark County property records show the house as belonging to Robert Brannfors.last_img

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