Mumia Abu-Jamal : “I am an outlaw journalist”

first_img June 3, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information News Follow the news on United States Organisation Being the “Voice of the Voiceless” played a significant role. And this expression actually comes from the title of a Philadephia Inquirer headline after I was arrested in 1981. As a teenager, I was a radical journalist working on the staff of the Black Panthers national newspaper. The FBI was actually monitoring my writings since I was 14. My first job was being a reporter. Because of my writings, I am far better known that any inmate in America. If it were not the case, I think there would have been less pressure for the Court to create a special law to affect my conviction. Most of the men and women on death row are not well known. Because I continue to write, this is an element that would have affected the thinking of the judges and made them change the ruling for not giving me a new trial. I think they were thinking “You’re a big mouth, you won’t get a new trial”. You expect a little more from a federal Court. Because of my case, a dozen of other cases can be affected.What do you think of the media coverage of your case ? For further information and to offer support for Mumia Abu-Jamal, contact: Law Offices of Robert R. Bryan 2088 Union Street, Suite 4, San Francisco, CA 94123-4117 http://www.MumiaLegalDefense.orgPetition also available from our website 9/11 changed a lot of things in the US. People challenging or opposing the government would not be supported anymore. The press also changed. Things that were “allowable” became unacceptable after 9/11. I think 9/11 changed the way people thought and it changed the tolerance of the media. For example, even though 9/11 happened in Manhattan and Washington DC, the jail was closed for an entire day, here in Pennsylvania, and we were locked down. On August 29th, 2010, Reporters Without Borders Washington DC representative, Clothilde Le Coz, visited Mumia Abu-Jamal, prisoner on death row for nearly three decades. Ms. Le Coz was accompanied by Abu-Jamal’s lead attorney, Robert R. Bryan, and his legal assistant, Nicole Bryan. The meeting took place in room 17 of the State Correctional Institution (SCI) in Waynesburg, Greene county, Pennsylvania.Reporters Without Borders: As a journalist who continues to work in prison, what are your latest reports focused on?Mumia Abu-Jamal: The prison population in the United States is the highest in the world. Over the past year, for the first time in 38 years, the prison population declined.Some states, like California or Michigan, are taking fewer prisoners because of overcrowding. State budgets are restrained and some prisoners are released because of the economic situation.Prisons in America are vast and the number of prisoners is immense. It’s impressive to see how much money is spent by the US government and how invisible we are. No one knows. Most people don’t care. Some journalists report when there is a drama in prison and think they know about it. But this is not real : it is sensationalist. You can find some good writings. But they are unrealistic. My reporting is what I have seen with my eyes and what people told me. It is real. My reporting has to do with my reality. They mostly have been focusing on death row and prison. I wish it were not so. There is a spate of suicides on death row in the last year and a half. But this is invisible. I broke stories about suicide because it happened on my block.I need to write. There are millions of stories and some wonderful people here. Among these stories, the ones I chose to write are important, moving, fragile. I decide to write them but part of the calculation is to know whether it’s helpful or not. I have to think about that. As a reporter, you have a responsability when you publish those kind of stories. Hopefully, it will change their lives for the better.Do you think the fact you were a reporter affected your case ? Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says September 3, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Mumia Abu-Jamal : “I am an outlaw journalist” I have written on History, one of my passions. I would love to write about other things. My latest works are about war, but I also write about culture and music. I have an internal beat that I try to keep through poetry and drums. Very few things have matched the pleasure that I get from learning music. It’s like learning another language. And to write, that’s a challenge ! A music teacher comes every week and teaches me. A whole new world is opening to me and I get a better grasp of it now. Music is one of the best thing mankind has done. The best of our lives. Once, I read that I was no longer on death row. I was sitting here when I read it. I haven’t stopped sitting here for one second.Because I was coming from the craft, a lot of reporters did not want to cover my case because they feared they would be attached. They had to face criticisms for being partial and sometimes they were told by their editors they could not cover it. Since the beginning of the case, people who could cover me best were not allowed to. Most of reporters I worked with are no longer working. They retired and nobody took the work over.But the press should have a role to play here. Millions of people saw what was done in Abu Ghraib. Its leader, smiling on the pictures that have been published, worked here before going to Abu Ghraib. In death row, you have people without a high school degree who can decide whether someone lives or dies. For whatever reason, they have the power to make you not eat if they don’t want to. And none of that power is checked by anyone. There are informal rules. These people can make someone’s life a living hell on a wink. When I chose which stories I want to write about, I am never short on material. From a writing perspective, this field is rich.No matter what my detractors are saying about me, I am a reporter. This country would be a whole lot worse without journalists. But to many of them, I am an outlaw reporter. Prior to prison, in my work for various radio stations, I met people from all around the world and despite my conflicts with some editors, I had the greatest job.The support you receive in Europe compared to the support you receive here in the United States, is very different. How do you explain the difference and do you still believe international mobilization will be helpful ?Of course it will. The European mobilization might be pressuring the US regarding the death penalty.Foreign countries, like European ones, went through a specific history of repression. There was an in-their-bones-knowledge of what it is to be in prison. They know about prison, death row and concentration camps. In the US, very few people had that experience. That speaks to how cultures look at things in the world. In Europe, the very ideal of death penalty is an anathema. If the Supreme Court agrees on a new trial, only your sentence will be reviewed. Not your conviction. How do you feel about staying in prison for life, if you are not executed ?In Pennsylvania, life sentence is a slow death row. And under the state law, there are 3 degrees of murders. The first degree is punished by life sentence or death. The second and the third ones are punished by life sentence. People do not get out. The highest juvenile rate of life sentences is here in Pennsylvania.But here is my point, in Philadelphia, there were two other cases around my time were people killed a cop. The first one got aquittal. The second once, caught on a surveillance camera, did not get a death sentence.How do you manage to “escape” death row ?center_img to go further United StatesAmericas June 7, 2021 Find out more News United StatesAmericas News April 28, 2021 Find out more RSF_en To motivate more people around your cause, it might be helpful to get an up to date picture of you, today, on death row. Does the fact that we don’t have any updated picture of you affect your situation and the ability of more people to mobilize around your cause ? WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists Having a public image is partly helpful. The essence of an image is propaganda. Pictures are therefore not that important. The human image is the true one. There, I try to do my best. In 1986, prison authorities took recorders from reporters and you were only allowed a pen and a paper. Now that there is only the meaning of one article left, one can make monsters and models from his article. NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Newslast_img read more

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Oxford imam: “No Muslim terrorism in the UK before Iraq”

first_imgAn Oxford imam has made claims in an interview with rt.com that there was no Islamic terrorism in the UK before Iraq.Dr Taj Hargey was speaking in the aftermath of the Woolwich killing of Drummer Lee Rigby. The British soldier was attacked by men who are believed to be British-born Muslim converts. In a camera-phone video, one of the men claimed the attack was a response to the way “Muslims are dying by British soldiers every day”.Dr Hargey condemned the murder in the strongest possible terms, but argued that there was “a linkage” between the events in Woolwich and British foreign policy.The imam of the Oxford Islamic Congregation, claimed that “there was no Muslim terrorism in the United Kingdom until Blair went illegally into Iraq”.Prime Minister David Cameron said in a media address outside Downing Street that the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby last week “sickened us all” and that the attacks were a “betrayal of Islam… that gives so much to our country.”Cameron continued, “There is absolutely no justification for these acts and the fault for them lies solely and purely with the sickening individuals that carried out this attack”.Dr Taj Hargey, who has provoked controversy for inviting the first ever woman to lead and preach at Friday prayers in Britain, and for marrying Islamic women to non-Islamic men, called for the Muslim community in the UK to confront the radical and extremist minority. He said, “Their [extremist] ideology and philosophy must be demolished”.He also claimed that that Islam is a religion of peace: “You don’t kill someone in the name of God, Islam condemns that… it’s pure blasphemy”.Zain Iqbal, a first year student at Brasenose College and a member of the Oxford University Islamic society told Cherwell that “under no circumstances do grievances justify bringing terror to our streets.”He continued, “However, labeling terrorism as Islamic ventures into dangerous territory and is unjustified. Throughout history we have seen terrorism emanating from all quarters and we should remain acutely aware to not label entire communities.”last_img read more

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Flying Ronaldo fires Juve top as Buffon equals Maldini’s Serie A record

first_imgHe then flashed a curling shot just wide in added time as Juve closed out what was a tight match against Claudio Ranieri’s side, who sit just two points above the relegation zone.– Buffon landmark –The win, gained early in the week ahead of Sunday’s Italian Super Cup clash with Lazio in Riyadh, was a further source of happiness for Buffon, who made his 647th Serie A appearance in place of the injured Wojciech Szczesny.The 41-year-old also became Juve’s all-time record appearance maker on 479 matches, one ahead of Alessandro Del Piero.Buffon began his professional career as a teenager in 1995 at Parma, where he won the UEFA cup and Coppa Italia in 1999 before moving to Juve two years later.He has won nine Serie A titles and the Coppa Italia four times in Turin but has failed to conquer Europe despite reaching two Champions League finals under previous coach Massimiliano Allegri.However he will have another chance at winning Europe’s top club competition after returning to Juve in the summer following a disappointing season at Paris Saint-Germain.His team cruised into the last 16 after qualifying from Group D unbeaten, six points ahead of second-placed Atletico Madrid.The former Italy captain also holds the appearance record for his national team, with 176 caps between 1997-2018, winning the 2006 World Cup.Later on Wednesday Brescia attempt to move out of the relegation zone when they host Sassuolo in a rescheduled week seven fixture that was postponed following the death of the away side’s president Giorgio Squinzi.Share on: WhatsApp Genoa, Italy | AFP | Cristiano Ronaldo continued his hot streak as his towering header gave Juventus a 2-1 win at Parma to put Juventus top of the table as Gianluigi Buffon equalled Paolo Maldini’s Serie A appearance record.Ronaldo met Alex Sandro’s looping cross with an incredible leap and header just before half-time to put Juve on 42 points, three ahead of Inter ahead of their match with struggling Genoa on Saturday.“I’m really happy with the result… It was a really good goal also because it was the one that won the three points,” said Ronaldo, who earlier in the season was off-form amid injury concerns.“Like I said before I’d had pain in my knee for around a month, but now I’m OK and now I want to help Juventus win trophies.”His 10th league goal of the season came after Samp’s Gianluca Caprari had levelled Paulo Dybala’s superb volleyed opener.The Argentine met Alex Sandro’s raking cross in the 19th minute with the most delicate of volleys, caressing the ball past Emil Audero from the edge of the box.Maurizio Sarri’s side had so much of the ball they already looked home and dry but they failed to capitalise on their possession and were punished by Gianluca Caprari 10 minutes before the break, the Italian pouncing after Sandro was caught on the ball to crash his finish past Buffon.However Ronaldo soon sparked into action, first fizzing in a cross that both Gonzalo Higuain and Dybala just only just failed to get contact on.The Portugal forward then put the away side back in front in the final minute of the half with his sixth goal in five matches in all competitions, a hanging header from another pinpoint Sandro cross.The 34-year-old twice came close to a second in the dying seconds, first when he was ruled to be in an offside position after latching on to Aaron Ramsey’s through ball and tapping past an onrushing Audero.last_img read more

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Gas Prices Continue To Tank

first_imgPrices are falling at the pump as the coronavirus outbreak lowers demand worldwide.As of Saturday, the average price in the U.S. was $2.15 a gallon for regular unleaded, 44 cents cheaper than a year ago. Oil prices also plummeted because of a price feud between Saudi Arabia and Russia. Analysts with the Oil Price Information Service predict gasoline prices could drop another 40 to 70 cents by late April or early May.The lower prices might not be much benefit to many Americans who are staying home, as they practice social distancing or live under shelter-in-place orders.last_img

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Local Lawyer Takes Racetrack’s Sports Betting Case To U.S. Supreme Court

first_imgBy John Burton |LITTLE SILVER — The future of Monmouth Park could rest in the hands of lawyer and Two River area resident Ronald J. Riccio as he prepares to offer arguments to the U.S. Supreme Court later this year.Riccio, who lives in Little Silver, is continuing to prepare for his turn at what is often considered a highpoint of a legal career, getting to present a case before the nine members of the nation’s highest court, squaring off before some other heavy-hitting legal talent.This will be his first appearance before the Supreme Court during his 47-year legal career, “So, this is very exciting,” he said.“I think it would be safe to say,” offered Riccio, who is 71, “every lawyer would relish the opportunity to have a case before the U.S. Supreme Court.”But, he stressed, this is quite a serious matter that has both constitutional importance and real world ramifications.“So, this is not just some academic discussion on constitutional principles,” he maintained. “There are people who are depending on the successful outcome of this case and live with the threat of losing their livelihoods hanging over their heads every day.”The case at hand concerns a longstanding legal battle over preventing New Jersey, and most other states, from allowing sports betting. Advocates for the Monmouth Park racetrack, including the New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, one of the operators of Monmouth Park and Riccio’s client, have long stressed the track needs the infusion of cash that sports betting as an attraction would bring to the financially struggling racetrack.He and the state’s legal representative are challenging the 1992 federal law, the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, or PASPA. That law, ironically, was sponsored 25 years ago by then New Jersey’s Democratic U.S. Senator Bill “Dollar Bill” Bradley, a former professional basketball player. The law was enacted over concerns about the effects sports gambling would have on the integrity of the games and the public. The law, however, did exempt four states from the prohibition: Nevada, Oregon, Delaware and Montana.In 2011, New Jersey voters approved a referendum to amend its constitution, allowing the Legislature to approve sports gambling at its casinos and at current and/or former racetracks in 2012.But that law was successfully challenged in federal court by the National Football League (NFL), National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL), Major League Baseball (MLB) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The issue has been going back and forth in the state Legislature, with the approval of bills allowing the process to move forward, and in the federal courts, where the leagues continued to win, stymieing state efforts.Riccio has argued, and will continue to make the case in written briefs and in his planned oral arguments to the court, that this rises to a constitutional issue the highest court needs to address.It boils down to state’s sovereignty, argues Riccio, who had taught constitutional law at Seton Hall Law School for 20 years, as well as serving as the school’s dean from 1988 to 1999. “What the federal government can’t do,” he said, “it can’t command the state to regulate the people in the states the way Congress wants the states to regulate them.” Under federal law that’s referred to as “commandeering,” forcing the state to take action it wouldn’t otherwise take. “Can the federal government dictate to the states how the states regulate their people?” is the issue at hand, he said. “And the answer is no,” according to Riccio, as it would violate the U.S. Constitution’s 10th Amendment. That amendment designates powers not specifically delegated to the federal government, nor prohibited by it, to the states.The sports leagues have continued to argue that allowing sports betting jeopardizes the integrity of the games.Representatives from the sports leagues did not immediately return calls and emails seeking comment for this story.Riccio dismisses the leagues’ argument as “hypercritical,” “because of the way the leagues have conducted themselves.” He points to the fact that the former Oakland Raiders football team has plans to relocate to Las Vegas, Nevada, where betting on, or against, the team is legal; and that some of the sports leagues are now involved in fantasy leagues, where participants can bet on individual players.The other issue at hand, Riccio said, is “the human element.”“You’re talking about the entire equine industry in New Jersey that is going to get threatened, if not extinguished, if Monmouth Park had to shut down.” That includes the loss of the large number of jobs the track provides for its season, he warned.Attendance at the storied racetrack has been in decline for a number of years, with track supporters maintaining the track’s inability to provide other attractions like casino-style gaming (which surrounding states have), or sports gambling, have made it that much harder to offer larger purses. They argue it also keeps the track from attracting top-tier horses and trainers, and by extension, customers. “And without the revenue that sports betting is expected to generate,” Riccio said, “it’s going to be very difficult for Monmouth Park to survive.”In the final analysis, “It’s a doomsday scenario for the equine industry,” certainly for Monmouth County, as well as for much of the state, Riccio said, “if Monmouth Park does not survive.”Riccio serves as general counsel for the McElroy, Deutch, Mulvaney and Carpenter law firm, which has offices in Tinton Falls as well as elsewhere in the state, in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Florida. He maintains his own practice but has retired from teaching at Seton Hall.Riccio is being assisted by his colleague Elliot Berman and by Edward Hartnett, a constitutional law scholar who teaches at Seton Hall. But even with their help, Riccio conceded it is time consuming, preparing the needed briefs and getting ready to address the large number of amicus (“friend of the court”) briefs this case is expected to attract; to say nothing of the other formidable legal talent who will appear on this matter. New Jersey, which is supporting Riccio’s position, is being represented by Theodore Olsen, who was Solicitor General for President George W. Bush’s administration, and had argued before the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of then-candidate Bush for Bush v. Gore, deciding the 2000 presidential election. Representing the leagues is Paul Clement, who had worked as Solicitor General for George W. Bush after Olsen’s departure. Clement had represented the NBA for labor negotiations during the contentious 2011 player lockout.“The lawyering throughout this case has been excellent,” he noted. “At this point in time, working on the Supreme Court brief,” he said, “is constantly on my mind.”Riccio and other lawyers will submit written briefs early this fall and, while oral arguments haven’t been formally scheduled yet, Riccio suspects it will be in late November or early December. He anticipates the court will render its decision in late spring 2018.This article was first published in the August 3 – 10, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Huge Retirement Sale With Lynne’s Fashion Boutique

first_imgDon’t forget to register to win one of the Fantastic Prizes such as a 55″ T.V, Ring Video Doorbell, Ninja Air Fryer, Google Home Mini and much more. Mention this email and receive 5,000 Prize Dollars toward our Prize Giveaway.  Lynne has now chosen to retire and and move on to her next phase of life. She is holding a Retirement Celebration Sale with huge markdowns on every item. Come by, enjoy the sale, save hundreds and say goodbye to your Fashion Boutique friends. Here at Lynne’s Fashion Boutique our Huge Retirement Celebration Sale just got better! We now have discounts up to 65% off regular pricing!Now is a perfect time to browse and shop for Easter, Mother’s Day, Weddings, Formal Events or just great every day casuals. Also, don’t miss our must see selections of Imported from Thailand,  Silk Dresses and Gowns.  Hurry in to save hundreds of dollars while there is still plenty to choose from! Thirty One Years ago, Lynne Goldberg quite unexpectedly began “Dressing Women” in the Toms River area from a small first floor office building. She provided top label selections in casuals, special events and accessories. Decades and four locations of growth later, Lynne’s Fashion Boutique of Little Silver has continued to serve the community. Adorning women for Mother of the Bride or Groom, Socials as well as every day casuals has been their passion. Their selections are recognizable, highly regarded international and domestic labels.  We are located at 31 Church Street in Little Silver, NJ 07739. Open Tues-Friday 10:30am to 5:30pm Saturday from 10:30am to 4:00pmlast_img read more

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Seniors Adjust to Life in Lockdown

first_imgAs with most senior residences, Chelsea Senior Living communities closely follow New Jersey Department of Health guidelines. All employees have the personal protective equipment they need, including masks, gloves, face shields and hand sanitizer, and are screened before each shift.  To keep residents and their families in touch with one another Brighton Gardens uses iPads and schedules Facetime and Skype calls, said Rathgeber.  She chats on the phone with family and friends, and keeps busy reading, most recently Ken Follet and Robert Parker. “I have a dear friend with a lot of books,” she said. “I’m hoping to get another batch from her soon.” The hardest part of quarantine for many of the seniors, Rathgeber said, is understanding why they can’t have visitors.  With the coronavirus touching every aspect of our society, all everyone is affected. Officials, celebrities and loved ones tell us to “Stay home. Stop the spread. Save lives.”  “Communication with families is done through text, email, telephone and video venues. Our residents no longer take their meals in a communal dining room,” he said. “Their meals are delivered to their apartments.”  Some of these seniors – many of them octogenarians or older and many with pre-existing medical conditions – are struggling to accept the changes to their lives. Rose Tamburro has lived through World War II and outlived two husbands and a daughter, but she never thought she’d find herself masked and quarantined in her Lincroft apartment. It’s an unprecedented time but Plant, a widow, and her generation have weathered more: World War II, the Korean and Vietnam wars and 9/11. Plant remembers the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 when her children were young. “I was terrified,” Plant recalled. “My husband was coming home early from work. I packed the whole car – baby formulas and all. I was a wreck,” she said of her plans to flee and take cover. “We were going to drive to Pennsylvania.” Now they must rely on family, friends or volunteer groups to shop for their food. Known as the Greatest Generation, many are living alone, suddenly cut off from their activities, houses of worship, even the supermarket. Some who’ve embraced technology may be navigating how to get the news online and what to do when their grandchildren want to talk to them on something called Zoom. Rose Tamburro of Lincroft doesn’t venture out of her apartment without donning her mask. Photo by Judy O’Gorman Alvarez But she spends her time reading the newspaper, chatting with family on the phone, watching TV, cleaning her apartment and cooking. “I love to cook and I love to dance. And I do them both every day in my apartment,” she said. “I cook lamb shank, pasta fagioli, whatever.” In pre-COVID-19 days, the Middletown Senior Center would be organizing bus trips, bingo games and crafts. But nowadays, staff is checking in with seniors to see how they’re faring. Seniors living alone have tried to make the best of it though. Davis said, “It does take a village. And this hardship exemplifies the community spirit and it’s wonderfulto see.” When Barbara Plant’s grandchildren visit, they keep their distance to avoid any possible transmission of the coronavirus. Photo courtesy Pat Nelson So Plant doesn’t spend time ruminating about what she’s missing now. Sure, she’d prefer to be going to breakfast with friends, spending time with family and doing everyday activities. “But so much of that stuff is not that important,” she said. “Some seniors are very stressed,” said Alison Block, a psychologist in Oceanport. “They’re not familiar with technology, they worry they may be ‘hacked,’ and they may be having trouble ordering food online.” At Brighton Gardens in Middletown, like most long-term care and senior living community facilities, residents’ health is closely monitored. Outside visitors and group activities have been suspended and residents stay in their rooms. She points out that a person who “normally would be playing mah-jongg or bridge” has been thrust into a world without those activities. In her practice, specializing in anxiety disorders, Block said, “I’m seeing people cut off from their normal support system.” “We have amazing life enrichment managers,” said Lori Rathgeber, director of sales. “Someone goes into every single apartment, reads to them, plays a game, so that they are getting stimulation every day.” Plant said at Shadow Lake Village in Middletown, an active adult community where she lives, some residents do informal exercises in the parking lot and many of her neighbors play mah-jongg online. “We’re turning a disadvantage into something that’s new and unique.” “And then that got settled,” she said. “And it was over.” “Oh, this is serious,” she said of COVID-19. She only goes for short walks outside her building. “And I always wear my mask.” Her daughter and daughter-in-law bring groceries and hot meals so she doesn’t have to venture to the supermarket. When her grandchildren visit they stand outside the glass door. “We personally contact each member to make sure they have resources and they’re in touch with their family members,” said Kourtney Davis, Middletown Senior Center supervisor.  “If the weather is good, I’ll walk with a girlfriend – but she’s 6 feet away from me,” she said. Staff can advise seniors of stores that may have curbside pickup or contactless checkouts and, if needed, steer them to programs for monetary help such as Lunch Break or Meals on Wheels. Some seniors are frail or convalescing and unable to get out of their homes in nonpandemic times. “We’re here to assist all members,” Davis said. “It’s so important right now for families to be in touch – even if they’re out of state,” said Davis. “That’s where the breakdown can happen. We follow through to make sure everybody is talking.” Some residents have embraced the technology and for some the reactions have been endearing. “We get a lot of ‘Where are you? I can see you, but I can’t touch you.’ ”  Plant admits it’s a trying time and she’s had disappointments; her 85th birthday celebration was scheduled for the Molly Pitcher Inn. “We had to cancel,” she said. “But that’s neither here nor there.”  She misses attending the Zumba classes the building used to run and daily Mass at St. Leo the Great church across the street. “I don’t know when we’ll be able to go back,” she said.  Keeping seniors safe is on the minds of the Monmouth County Freeholders who have launched initiatives to help them, including expanding SCAT service, early morning transportation for seniors to take advantage of designated shopping hours offered by many grocery stores and other essential retail locations. “People are talking about dying,” Block said of seniors and the middle-aged. “I’ve had people who have said to me, ‘I’m not afraid to die, but I’m afraid to die alone.’ ”  And she has discovered she has a penchant for online shopping, although among the purchases are some she plans to return. “I have so much that has to go back to Talbot’s when this is all over.” Easter came and went with barely a celebration but Tamburro’s grandchildren and dog came to visit – social distance-style. “They came to the window with plants and homemade cookies,” said Tamburro, who lives on the first floor. They sang “Happy Easter” and left the gifts on the chair outside her window so she could retrieve them later. “We have had a strict no-visitation policy in effect since March 12th,” said Tom Kranz, director of communications, in an email.  But according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people 65 years and older are considered at high risk for severe illness from COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.  She urges everyone to ask themselves, “What can we all do to help our seniors?” Sometimes that means chatting with seniors about their concerns, especially about fears and isolation. “There is a loneliness factor, of course,” said Davis, “when you’re afraid to leave your house. But I’ve heard great things too, like it’s an opportunity to finally clean out that drawer, tackle projects.” Rose Tamburro has heeded the warning to stay home and out of supermarkets – even though she lives in a senior living apartment house adjacent to the Lincroft Acme. Instead, her daughter comes to drop off groceries.  “The health and safety of our residents and employees has always been and remains our number one priority,” said Kranz. She allows herself a walk to a small nearby store and recently brought a bagel back for a neighbor. “When she opened the door I threw her the bag – keeping 6 feet back – and she threw me a kiss,” Tamburro laughed. “It’s what we have to do.” Perhaps the most important role of the senior center is keeping the lines of communication open, especially between the senior and their family. Each member has supplied the center with an emergency contact to be called if their loved one is possibly at risk.  The article originally appeared in the April 30 – May 6, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. Some favorite pastimes include residents lining up in their doorways and playing Hall Bingo. “We yell the numbers down the hall,” said Rathgeber. “Or we go down the hall and let them sing karaoke. That’s a lot of fun. You know, you’ve got to get creative.” Barbara Plant celebrated her Easter this year 6 feet away from her loved ones. And even though social distancing can be inconvenient, she doesn’t feel lonely. By Judy O’Gorman Alvarez “Just put me with a book and I’ll be OK.”last_img read more

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Bumper maize crop for SA

first_imgA field of maize, known in South Africaas mealies, on a farm in the EasternFree State.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For morefree images, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Priscilla Tsotso SehooleMedia liaison officer, Department of Agriculture+27 12 319 6843Janine ErasmusSouth Africa has achieved its biggest maize crop in 29 years, weighing in at around 13-million tons. This equates to about 4.8 tons per hectare and closely rivals the record 1981/82 yield of 14.42-million tons.Despite a worrying dry spell at the start of the growing season, the bumper crop is attributed to better farming techniques, above average rainfall, increased use of biotechnology and a move away from sunflowers and wheat, resulting in an 8.2% increase in the number of maize plants in the ground.This is the third year in a row that South Africa has reaped an above-average maize crop. Around 7.8-million tons is white maize and the balance is yellow, which is mainly used for animal feed.This means that not only will the country have ample supplies for its residents, who consume around 9-tons of the grain annually, but it will be able to export about 2-million tons in both white and yellow varieties.To date most of this year’s exportable maize produce has gone to drought-stricken areas of Kenya. About 3-million tons will leave the country next year.South Africa is the continent’s biggest maize producer. Last year’s harvest brought in 12.05-million tons of which 1.9-million tons was carried over to 2010.Crop estimatesThe Department of Agriculture’s Crop Estimates Committee is tasked with releasing crop estimates on a regular basis. To do this, the committee uses geographic information science (GIS) and an innovative, locally developed process called the Producer Independent Crop Estimate System (Pices).This involves a number of steps including the use of satellite imagery, obtained from the France-based Spot Image Group, to digitally establish boundaries of crop fields, the selection of sampling points at random, and visual surveys – using light aircraft – to obtain crop data.Once the aerial survey is complete, the information obtained is used to statistically calculate crop estimates.This system eliminates dependency on producers’ data, which has often been inconsistent in the past.The Pices system has digitised about 13-million hectares of crop land in all nine of South Africa’s provinces, and is constantly monitored to ensure that data is current. According to a GIS expert, this area can be covered in about two months by just three field observation teams.But the committee’s forecast is not as optimistic for the 2010/11 season, as plantings will decline mainly due to a drop in the maize price both locally and internationally, and more severe El Niño conditions. This climate phenomenon is expected to bring good rain in spring, but drier conditions in the middle of the warm season may even lead to a drought in some areas.In this case, commercial farmers have the option of switching to hardier crops, such as sunflowers. Maize prices are lower because of the stronger rand, the excellent current yield and the forecast of a similarly plentiful harvest in the US.While some other Southern African countries have also enjoyed a good maize season, a drought in neighbouring Zimbabwe has placed extreme strain on this year’s crop.Staple foodMaize (Zea mays) is a grass and a staple food of people on the African continent, as well as the most common livestock feed grain.In South Africa, which is also the breadbasket of the Southern African region, the maize sector comprises both commercial and small-scale farmers, mostly in the North West, Free State, Mpumalanga and northern KwaZulu-Natal provinces.Maize is also used in the production of biofuel and starch, which itself is used in a number of products ranging from paint to cosmetics.Other major crops in South Africa include wheat, sunflowers, sugar, fruit and nuts.Media Liaison OfficerMs Priscilla Tsotso Sehoole (Acting)Mail:Private Bag X250, PRETORIA, 0001Street:No 20, Agriculture Place, Block DA, 1st Floor, cnr Beatrix Street and Soutpansberg Road, Arcadia, PRETORIATel:(012) 319 6843Fax:(012) 321 8558E-mail:[email protected]last_img read more

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Banyana and Zimbabwe in goalless draw

first_img14 July 2014Banyana Banyana played to a goalless draw against Zimbabwe at the Rufaro Stadium in Harare on Friday in an international friendly. South Africa entered the clash fresh off a 2-1 win over Africa Women’s Championship hosts Namibia in Windhoek a week earlier.Coach Vera Pauw made two changes in defence from the team that faced the Namibians, bringing in Lebogang Ramalepe at right back, while Gloria Thato took over on the other side of the field at left back.The match was played on an artificial turf and the home side started at a high tempo, forcing Sasol Banyana Banyana to concede a corner in the opening seconds of the match.Disallowed goalSouth Africa, though, were the first to find the back of the net in the 10th minute, but Refiloe Jane’s effort was ruled off-side.The Mighty Warriors responded well and piled pressure on Banyana Banyana, getting off a couple of shots on target, but South African goalkeeper Thoko Mndaweni made some fine saves to deny the Zimbabweans a reward.After the break, Banyana Banyana had a chance to open the scoring when Jane made a good connection with the ball from inside the box in the 50th minute, but her header was directed into the Zimbabwean goalkeeper’s hands.Leandra Smeda almost stole a win for Banyana Banyana with three minutes of play remaining, but it was not to be as the match ended in a stalemate.Tight rivalryIn their previous match against Zimbabwe, played at the Dobsonville Stadium in Soweto in April, Banyana Banyana had to come back from two goals down to draw 2- 2.In May, they qualified for the African Women’s Championship (AWC) after the Comoros withdrew from qualifying following a 13-0 thrashing at the hands of South Africa in the first leg of their qualifiers against the 2012 AWC runners-up.The following month, June, Banyana defeated Botswana 4-0 in Vanderbijlpark in the first of a number of friendly matches the team will play to prepare for the AWC, which takes place from 11 to 25 October.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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