Impact of climate change on Antarctic krill

first_imgAntarctic krill Euphausia superba (hereafter ‘krill’) occur in regions undergoing rapid environmental change, particularly loss of winter sea ice. During recent years, harvesting of krill has increased, possibly enhancing stress on krill and Antarctic ecosystems. Here we review the overall impact of climate change on krill and Antarctic ecosystems, discuss implications for an ecosystem-basedfisheries management approach and identify criticalknowledge gaps. Sea ice decline, ocean warming and other environmental stressors act in concert to modify the abundance, distribution and life cycle of krill. Although some of these changes can have positive effects on krill, their cumulative impact is most likely negative. Recruitment, driven largely by the winter survival of larval krill, is probably the population parameter most susceptible to climate change. Predicting changes to krill populations is urgent, because they will seriously impact Antarctic ecosystems. Such predictions, however, are complicated by an intense inter-annual variability in recruitment success and krill abundance. To improve the responsiveness of the ecosystem-based management approach adopted by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR),critical knowledge gaps need to be filled. In addition to a better understanding of the factors influencing recruitment, management will require a better understanding of the resilience and the genetic plasticity of krill life stages, and a quantitative understanding of under-ice and benthic habitat use. Currentprecautionary management measures of CCAMLR should be maintained until a better understanding of these processes has been achieved.last_img read more

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Leinster recover to conquer Castres

first_imgLeinster reasserted their control of Heineken Cup Pool One by ending Castres’ proud 18-match home record at Stade Pierre-Antoine. Jimmy Gopperth scored two tries in response, the second coming in first-half injury time, as Leinster closed the gap to 17-12 at the interval. It was a real war of attrition in the concluding 40 minutes and Matt O’Connor’s men gained vital momentum on the hour mark, courtesy of three Gopperth penalties and a drop goal from Rob Kearney on his 50th Heineken Cup appearance. Flanker Jordi Murphy then claimed his first European try to put the result beyond doubt, while Castres capitalised on Sean Cronin’s sin-binning to score an injury-time consolation try through Remi Lamerat. Having lost at home to Northampton in the previous round, Leinster needed to bounce back in order to keep hold of top spot and remain on course for the quarter-finals. Castres were missing some notable names through injury – top-scoring scrum-half Rory Kockott and back- rowers Pedrie Wannenburg and Antonie Claassen chief among them – but their shadow side got off to a very strong start. Flanker Ibrahim Diarra got his hands free to send centre Lamerat weaving through some lacklustre Leinster challenges. He was brought down in sight of the posts, before Seremaia Bai’s long pass put the waiting Gray over in the left corner. Television match official Derek Bevan confirmed the score which Cedric Garcia crisply converted. The excellent Diarra then forced another turnover near halfway from which the French side sprung winger Remi Grosso into space on the left and with Rob Kearney drawn in, he passed inside for Dulin to finish off their second try. Castres’ most recent home defeat was against Ulster last January and they fell to another Irish province here despite establishing a 14-0 lead and dominating the scrum. The under-strength Castres team ended the first quarter in full control as full-back Brice Dulin touched down to add to Scotland and Lions lock Richie Gray’s opening try. Garcia’s conversion left Leinster 14-0 adrift and with considerable ground to make up. Their forwards took up the baton, with Jordi Murphy held up short from a line-out maul. From the resulting scrum, the Castres defence was caught off guard as Eoin Reddan passed for his half-back partner Gopperth to score by the posts, with the New Zealander also converting. Goal-kicking scrum-half Garcia was on target in the 39th minute but the visitors – aided by a fine Fitzgerald run – got a timely boost when Gopperth shrugged off two tackles and stretched over under pressure from Gray to claim his second try. Leinster won a central penalty for some needless stamping by Garcia when play resumed and the successful kick from Gopperth made it a two-point game. Reddan soon sniped through on a break which led to a long-range drop goal from full-back Kearney, moving Leinster ahead for the first time, and Castres coughed up another penalty which Gopperth nudged home. Leinster were suddenly 24-17 ahead when a 63rd-minute carry from replacement prop Cian Healy – a late inclusion on the bench after an incredibly quick recovery from ankle surgery – set up Gopperth’s third penalty goal. The Castres pack battered away in the Leinster 22 but the visitors, following a spell of desperate defending, countered for a brilliant third try. Healy cut inside two tackles near the Castres 22 and passed for Murphy to dive over in the right corner in the 77th minute. Although the win was now beyond them, Castres’ persistence was rewarded in the dying seconds when Lamerat scrambled over from a close-in ruck. Press Associationlast_img read more

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O’Hara throws no-hitter in 1st collegiate game, sets tone for promising freshman season

first_imgCorrection: In a previous version of this article, the year Sydney O’Hara started off her high school career with two no-hitters was misstated. O’Hara began her senior season with two no-hitters. The Daily Orange regrets this error.Sydney O’Hara wasn’t looking to make history, but that’s exactly what she did.O’Hara, a freshman pitcher out of Cicero, N.Y., threw a no-hitter in her collegiate debut, making her one of seven players for Syracuse to ever accomplish the feat. O’Hara struck out 12 hitters through six innings, and walked just one in a 9-0 shutout of Austin Peay on Friday in the Orange’s first game of the season.“Within the first inning was probably when I knew it was going to be a good day,” O’Hara said. “I thought to myself, ‘I’m dead on today. This is going to be good.’”SU head coach Leigh Ross said O’Hara approaches the game with a poise and determination beyond her years. While some of the team’s other pitchers have more of a calm and stoic approach, O’Hara is very passionate and aggressive and has an attack mentality.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAnd she didn’t waste any time showing that to her new team.“When we told Syd she would be throwing the first game, I knew she would be super nervous, but she handled herself well,” Ross said. “As soon as the game started, there was this look on her face.”Though she didn’t expect to find that kind of success so soon, the star freshman took the mound with confidence. O’Hara opened her senior season in high school two straight no-hitters, so the performance was nothing new.“Sydney really had her best stuff going,” freshman catcher Nicole Lundstrom said. “It was a fun game to catch.”Based on her performance so far this season, O’Hara won’t just contribute for Syracuse on the mound. She had herself quite the day at the plate in her no-hitter, recording three hits and a pair of RBIs.O’Hara carried the Orange to a blowout win with her performance both on the mound and at bat, which made for a debut that people won’t soon forget.“I’m kind of happy I made history,” she said, “but like I said before, that wasn’t my goal. I was just looking to get the win. But yeah, I’m happy it happened.”Ross predicts O’Hara will be in the lineup every game for the Orange, whether that’s on the mound, as a designated player or at first base. O’Hara’s currently slotted at the No. 2 spot in the lineup, and it’s clear she’s capable of being a complete player for the Orange.She can hit, field and it’s now clear that she can pitch, as well.Ross said she expects big things from O’Hara this year. Syracuse is going to rely on her to throw major innings, as well as hit and field, which will certainly help the Orange moving forward.When asked about her final thoughts on the historic day, O’Hara said it was amazing. Syracuse has been her dream college since seventh grade, after living nearby her whole life.“I don’t expect to throw a no-hitter every time out,” O’Hara said, “but it gave me a lot of confidence and that will help carry over to other games this season.“I know that I can pitch at this level.” Comments Published on February 12, 2014 at 2:17 am Contact Liam: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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USC Forward holds demonstration for accountability

first_img“I’d be more than happy to [help],” de León said. “I’ve always been a fighter for working families, all the time.” Karin, who lives in the city’s 9th Council District, said her landlord has tried to evict her four times in order to charge future tenants higher rent.   “With housing, it’s very sad the way everything is becoming,” Karin said. “As part of the 9th district, the owner of the house has tried to evict me four times … There is the risk that any minute he can do something like that and of course I would not like to end up on the street, especially like the people in Harbor Heights [and] Mid-City.” The coalition delivered a letter of the organization’s demands to President-elect Carol Folt’s office. In the letter, which was obtained by the Daily Trojan, the organization called for accessibility for low-income students, affordable housing, community benefits, campus safety and labor rights for faculty, staff and students. “We are aware that it may continue for the week,” Carlisle said. “The city of Los Angeles regulates that type of demonstration on public property, and thus far they have not created a problem for USC … We do drive by and monitor the situation, but should there become a problem, we would have LAPD’s labor relations bureau respond to arbitrate and mitigate any issues.” According to Department of Public Safety Assistant Chief David Carlisle, the SEIU secured a permit from the city of Los Angeles to create “Tent City” along Jefferson Boulevard. “USC, they’re a bad actor, they’re a bad neighbor,” said SEIU 721 chief-of-staff Gilda Valdez. “They don’t want to negotiate with us. In an institution that is one of the top institutions in the world, they create leaders, for them to teach them that they have no voice in their own employment, what kind of teaching is that?” “The tents are a symbol of the poverty that surrounds this campus,” Delgado said. “If you go three blocks in any direction, it’s the reality that our folks live with everyday, and the truth is that every time student housing goes up in and around the area landlords around the area see that they can charge $2,000 per unit and then look to evict the working folks that live in the area.” “When it comes to access to higher education, whether it’s a public institution like the University of California, the Cal State University system, or a private nonprofit independent academic and research university, like USC, access to those who are socioeconomically marginalized is critical,” de León said. “Our kids, and kids in poor neighborhoods, are just as smart as any other kids but they don’t have the same opportunity. So it’s an opportunity gap that exists and manifests.” ACCE co-director Joe Delgado is currently staying in one of the tents along Jefferson Boulevard to protest gentrification and evictions in the surrounding area caused by developments made by the University. Residents on Flower Drive and Exposition Boulevard have faced evictions as a result of expansions in student housing. Ebadi said she hopes the University will listen to the demands of the coalition and work to increase accountability among students and the community. USC Forward erected 10 tents along Jefferson Boulevard to protest gentrification, labor rights and University accountability. (Mia Speier/ Daily Trojan) Shany Ebadi, a junior majoring in political science who attended USC Forward’s press conference Saturday, said she has been working with the organization since last fall with a focus on the intersectionality of issues related to sexual assault and student safety. The coalition — a project of Service Employees International Union 721 — partnered with the Alliance of Californians for Community Evictions, Clergy & Laity United for Economic Justice, the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment, the LA Tenants Union and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Former California Senate Pro Tempore Kevin de León (left) listened to student, alumni and community members’ concerns regarding housing displacement and University accountability and transparency. (Andrea Klick/Daily Trojan) “It’s very hard for [our children] to dream to come to the University when the tuition is all the way to the moon and our salaries very low,” Karin said. “And I feel like we should do something to avoid that. We have great children, and they are as smart as anyone. We just don’t have the accessibility.”center_img “This is about power and control and greed for USC, and they’re not willing to share that with their students who supposedly they’re building to be leaders in this world,” Valdez said. “It has been a very difficult few years to be a Trojan,” the letter read. “As the incoming president, you have the opportunity to change the toxic culture and narrative surrounding our school — not through superficial house cleaning of bad actors, but through genuine, foundational and transformational changes to the way this university functions as both an educational institution and essential piece of the fabric of Southern California.” Karin also discussed the importance of USC reaching out to students in neighboring schools and promoting equal access to affordable higher education. USC Forward — a coalition of students, South Los Angeles residents and community leaders — began demonstrating along Jefferson Boulevard Saturday to demand accountability and transparency from the University. A member of ACCE who goes by “Karin” discussed the problem of rising rents and gentrification, which she attributes to the creation of USC Village and the rising cost of student housing in the neighborhood. De León said USC must work with community leaders and local high school students to ensure equal access to resources. During Sunday’s demonstration, organizers held a listening session for attendees to voice their grievances with the University. Former California Senate Pro Tempore Kevin de León sat down with attendees to discuss the importance of community engagement and commitment. He said that local residents are being pushed out of their homes by companies that want to create more opportunities for off-campus student housing options, so they can charge higher rates. Organizers set up “Tent City,” a group of 10 tents representing homelessness and the impact of gentrification in the surrounding community, outside of the University Park Campus gates. Amid the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, which brought thousands of people to campus throughout the weekend, demonstrators began camping out 24/7 on Saturday. They plan to continue the demonstration throughout the week. “USC defends the principle that tenured and untenured faculty are partners in shared governance,” outgoing Provost Michael Quick wrote in a statement to the Daily Trojan following the court’s decision in March. “The recent court decision affirms that principle.” Valdez said that USC could find a way to create shared governance within a union, but it does not want to relinquish its control over faculty decisions and issues. “We came to emphasize the importance of intersectionality of all the issues that are affecting both students and the community,” Ebadi said. “The racism, the sexism, the classicism is all tied into one another, and as you saw with the list of demands today, they are really all connected and you can’t target them one at a time.” Valdez said that SEIU has tried working and meeting with USC for over three years to create labor unions for University faculty; however, the school refused to budge. In a recent case involving full- and part-time non-tenure track faculty at the Roski School of Art and Design, the U.S. Court of Appeals disagreed with some of the language used in past court rulings on labor unions at universities and made it easier for employees to be considered managers who would be ineligible to unionize. “They are sleeping on the streets for five nights to ensure that their message is being heard and demanding the administration to be held accountable and listen to these stories,” Ebadi said.last_img read more

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Make or break for Vipers as they visit KCCA

first_img10EXPRESS FC258892324-132 16PAIDHA BLACK ANGELS FC2526171543-2812 14NDEJJE UNIVERSITY FC2454141837-1920 12SC VILLA2551192933-426 5ONDUPARAKA FC2410772419537 SOURCE: KCCA WEBSITE 6BUL FC249962722536 11BRIGHT STARS FC2571082724331 KCCA coach Mike Mutebi is confidentKCCA FC v Vipers SC – 4:00pmStar Times Stadium, Lugogo Kampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | KCCA FC and Vipers SC face off in game day 25 of the Star Times Uganda Premier League at Startimes Stadium, Lugogo today.“To many, it’s seen as the title decider while to the KCCA FC gaffer Mike Mutebi it is a game that could soften the quest for the 13th Championship for KCCA FC,” the KCCA FC website said of the match.“We are playing against arguably one of the best sides in the country in Vipers and many have dubbed it as the title decider,” Mutebi said, adding taht “Well! To me, it is a tie that has a lot to play for. We are well prepared for the game and we know what is a stake. We win it and the road to win the Championship is softened. All the lads are fit with exception of Julius Poloto who suffered a knock in training.”Both clubs played out one all stalemate in a nail-biting game played at St Mary’s Stadium, Kitende. Fillbert Obenchan who cancelled out Dan Sserunkuuma’s first half strike is back from suspension after accumulating three yellow cards.Mutebi’s side tops the log on 52 points while Vipers SC lie second on 48 points just four points from the log leaders.Fresh from the trip to Jinja and picking three vital points away against Kirinya Jinja SSS FC, KCCA can not afford to drop points against immediate rivals Vipers as the league hits the final bend. 7TOORO UNITED FC249962219336 15NYAMITYOBORA FC2444162038-1816 PosClubPWDLFAGDPts 9POLICE FC2596103740-333 1KCCA FC24157246192752 3URA FC241012223101342 13MAROONS FC2568112532-726 2VIPERS SC24139234161848 8KIRINYA JINJA SS259972531-636 4MBARARA CITY25118630181241 Vipers SC will hope their marksman Dan Serunkuuma comes alive like he has done in this fixture in the past.In the last 18 games between both clubs, 12-time league Champions KCCA FC have won 5 drawn 4 and lost 9. The have also scored 23 goals and conceded 27 hence collecting 19 points in 18 games.On the other hand, defending league Champions Vipers have won 9 drawn 4 and lost 5. The have also scored 27 goals and conceded 23 hence collecting 31 points in 18 games between both sides.A win for KCCA FC means the log lead is stretched to seven points and would clearly mean they are out of site. On the other hand, a win for Vipers SC would narrow KCCA FC’s log lead to one point between them and the Venoms. A draw means the status quo is maintained.STAR TIMES UGANDA PREMIER LEAGUE | 2018-2019 Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Warburton’s complaints ‘pointless’ – Adkins

first_imgReading manager Nigel Adkins says Mark Warburton is wasting his time by complaining about referees..Warburton has been critical of officials in recent weeks, including after penalty decisions against Norwich and Watford and Tony Craig’s red card at Birmingham.The Brentford boss used his pre-match programme notes to bemoan the current post-match appeals process and outline his ideas for “clear improvements to be implemented”.Recent decisions have angered WarburtonBut Adkins, who has been a league manager for eight years, thinks Warburton is hypersensitive to these issues because it’s his first season in the Championship.Adkins said: “It was interesting reading Mark’s comments before the game.“He’s felt they haven’t been getting the decisions but we should have had three penalties the other night – so it’s across the board.“I think he’s noticing it more as a new manager in this league. Having been a manager for a few years now you realise that that’s what it is. There’s no point complaining about a referee.“It’s pointless talking about it, you have to concentrate on your own performance.”Reading were beaten 3-1 at Griffin Park, with Jonathan Douglas’ late header ending a second-half fightback from the Royals.Douglas climbed over a defender before heading home via the crossbar and Adkins suggested he may have fouled his marker in the build-up.“Every game there’s something to question. Was it a foul or not? The referee hasn’t given it and that’s football,” Adkins said.“You have to look at yourself and your team’s performance. If I’m going to analyse anything it’s the chances we missed.“We were on the front foot and should have put them away.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Secularists Use Intelligent Design Reasoning

first_imgData from a star are hard to reconcile with natural causes. Are super-intelligent aliens at work?Despite their antipathy to the intelligent design movement, secular materialists are perfectly happy to infer design when it suits their purposes. They can even use the design filter to infer the presence of intelligent minds they know absolutely nothing about, simply from the effects on radiation.A recent case involves Tabby’s Star, KIC 8462852 in the Kepler Space Telescope catalog. Space.com says that a possible “alien megastructure” might exist around this star. Astronomers can’t rule it out. The signal just got “weirder” the article says; it defies natural explanations. Kepler looks for light dips in stellar spectra coming from planets transiting in front of a star.But Tabby’s Star’s transit signal, otherwise known as a “light-curve”, stopped astronomers in their tracks. Something passed in front of it, dimming its starlight a whopping 20 percent and other jumbled transit signals revealed that something wasn’t quite right with this particular star. Then, in an interview with The Atlantic, Penn State University astronomer Jason Wright speculated that the signal could be indicative of an “alien megastructure” that’s in the process of being built.The structure would have to be a “Dyson Sphere,” named after Princeton thinker Freeman Dyson who speculated that an intelligent civilization might maneuver all remaining planetary material into a giant sphere to capture the remaining energy from a dying star.The anomalous signature was curious enough to send astronomers scrambling for natural explanations before inferring an intelligent cause. This is the basic method of William Dembski’s Design Filter, a method for inferring intelligence by elimination of chance and natural law. Some astronomers have favored a natural cause: a swarm of comets, instead of aliens. There are problems with that theory, though; it would have to be impossibly far from the star to work.Shannon Hall at New Scientist says that a triple signal (three kinds of dimming) from Tabby’s Star “baffles astronomers” and cannot yet rule out aliens.What about that advanced alien megastructure? “Once you’re invoking arbitrary advanced aliens doing something with technology far beyond ours, then there isn’t very much that can’t be explained,” says Simon. “But we don’t really want to resort to that until we exhaust all of the possible natural explanations we can think of.”Even Wright, the astronomer who postulated the alien megastructure in the first place, admits that it’s a last resort.That’s similar to the complaint secularists give about theists, that invoking a super-intelligence like God ends scientific explanation. But in this case, it’s the secularists who came up with that possibility. What’s instructive about this case is that secular astronomers, on their own, were drawn to intelligence as a cause for a phenomenon, with the understanding it could be distinguished from natural causes or chance. That, in a nutshell, is intelligent design theory.Intelligent Design advocates are often more hesitant to rush to a design conclusion than these astronomers are. ID does not teach that everything is designed. In most scientific work, natural law and chance do just fine to explain what happens. But secularists shoot their feet out from under them by ruling intelligent causes out of court from the get-go. This ideological bias leads to absurdities like Darwin just-so stories that we showcase frequently here at CEH (e.g., 8/13/16, 8/06/16). It’s time to bring intelligence back into the explanatory toolkit of science. After all, some fields in science already do this routinely: archaeology, forensics, informatics, operations research, and optimization, among others.Recommended Resource: Douglas Axe explains in his new book Undeniable: How Biology Confirms Our Intuition that Life Is Designed that we all have a natural design intuition when looking at the world and all its complexity, and that’s a good thing. It’s a form of scientific reasoning he calls “common science.” He shows how Darwinians are trained out of their design intuition but end up forcing observations into an increasingly implausible story, just to maintain a materialistic worldview. Watch Axe introduce the thesis in a video on Evolution News & Views (90 minutes if you have the time).(Visited 25 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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South African street art wired for success

first_imgJanine ErasmusWire art is as unique a South African cultural icon as is boerewors, kwaito and Nelson Mandela. Across the country street vendors sell anything from Christmas decorations and wine racks to fruit bowls and representations of popular characters from animated films. These creations are works of art in their own right, delicately formed, colourfully decorated with beads and pieces of tin can, and lovingly finished off – plainly the work of talented hands.This art form has been given a boost by the Streetwires wire art project. With a small team of two artists and two marketing coordinators, the three founders – Winston Rangwani, Patrick Schofield and Anton Ressel – set out in 2000 to establish a formal business structure to support wire artists in Cape Town, and to tackle the ever-present problem of unemployment in South Africa by building on traditional skills that were already in place. Today Streetwires provides a creative outlet for more than 100 men and women, all of whom were previously unemployed. The project supplies skills training, raw materials and support, and encourages individual expression and an attitude of responsibility in taking control of the future.The Streetwires catalogue is bursting with beautiful and imaginative items. The Nguni range, featuring the beloved Nguni cattle farmed for hundreds of years by the Xhosa people, has been thoroughly researched and each piece is accurately crafted in terms of patterning and form. There are other Southern African wild animals and birds – the guinea fowl, the lion, the zebra and giraffe. Christmas baubles and stars are always popular, and the demand for the range of battery-operated radios outstrips the supply.In January 2006 Streetwires opened a workshop in the Ngwenya Glass Village, a craft centre in Muldersdrift, west of Johannesburg. Under the guidance of Joseph Ketche, who was transferred from Cape Town to head up the Joburg operation, the new Streetwires initiative is gaining ground and enjoying extensive support from the locals.“Ninety-nine percent of our items are sold to the local market,” says Ketche, “whereas about 75% of the Cape Town sales are destined for overseas. It’s a completely different environment, because we’ve found that while tourists like to buy game animals and larger goods, people in Joburg prefer smaller items such as keyrings, magnets, fashion accessories such as earrings and brooches, and so on. We’ve had to adjust our output accordingly.”It was tough having to start from the ground up, he explains, but so far 30 people have been trained in Joburg. Some have been retained by Streetwires and others have gone on to establish their own businesses. “We found that people who were not accustomed to working with their hands struggled to master the techniques. Some of them became disheartened and dropped out, but others persevered, and in fact it was often the case that we would come across a person who had a lot of talent but was just waiting for an outlet for that creativity.”Before embarking on the Muldersdrift expansion, Streetwires undertook a successful pilot project in Clanwilliam, a town located in the Cederberg region of the Western Cape province. The Clanwilliam Rural Wire Art Centre was established with a view to community development, but it also turned out to be a trial run for the setting up of the operation in Joburg.Says Ketche, “We left the people in the Clanwilliam community with all the equipment and skills needed to carry on with a wire-work enterprise – we taught them how to hold the pliers, how to select the gauge of the wire and the size of the bead, how to market themselves.”This is a vital component of the Streetwires project – skills development and transfer creates a ripple effect that is felt throughout the community, and the result is upliftment and empowerment. The establishment of the facility in Clanwilliam was supported by the Department of Arts and Culture and there are plans to open other such centres around South Africa, particularly in areas that are in need of social development. Streetwires is currently establishing a dedicated training and development division which will focus intensively on outreach projects, skills training and artist development.Streetwires as a community development project is indeed an inspiration. The issue of unemployment, which so easily leads to poverty and crime, is one that Streetwires has tackled by helping previously unemployed South Africans to earn a livelihood in a meaningful, sustainable way. The company has not only enabled its artists to sell their products overseas but has also expanded its product availability into local retail stores around the country, in addition to the success of the Clanwilliam initiative and the opening of the Joburg branch. A large proportion of Streetwires’ work is made on commission and because items can easily carry branding, they work well as corporate gifts.Street wire art, highly sought after by tourists and locals alike, shows in the most vibrant and vivid way that South Africans are creative and innovative with even the most simple materials at their fingertips, and in the most humble of surroundings, originating as it did in rural areas. Because the pieces are made by hand each one is unique, and now the products of this thriving art form are found in homes, galleries and even in the foyers and offices of corporate buildings all around the world.Useful linksStreetwiresB&B Craft MarketsCraft Council South AfricaEskom Due South Craft RouteCape Craft and Design Institutelast_img read more

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Taking Off the Training Wheels

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now The first time buyers and users of your product or service or solution will be disappointed by the challenges and limitations of what you sell. Because they lack experience, they are easily frustrated, and they are susceptible to being wooed away by a competitor.The second time they buy, they will believe that the first company they bought from was the obstacle to success. They will likely choose to buy from a larger company, considering it a safer choice. Many buyers will experience the same challenges and limitations when using the larger company, repeating the experience and becoming more discouraged.Some of the people and companies who try the product or service or solution will give up, concluding that it doesn’t work—or at least it doesn’t work for them. However, a good many will try to find someone who can make things work.The third time they buy looks an awful lot like the second time. If the largest and the alleged “best in the world” failed them, then the second largest company might be better because they try harder. When this decision fails the buyer, they start to look again for the right partner.At this point, the contacts and the company are ready for a real partner, having already become familiar with the systemic challenges and issues in buying and using your product or service or solution. They have a more mature understanding of their needs, and because they recognize the constraints of using what it is you sell, they are willing to look at making adjustments themselves and are infinitely more flexible when it comes to accepting how you deliver things to overcome the challenges they’ve experienced.You may not want to be a new buyer’s first experience. You may not want to be their second or third experience either. It might serve you better to focus on displacing your competitors, taking their unhappy clients away from them after your competition has educated them on your industry, your solutions, and the reality of the constraints that afflict all of you.Win customers away from your competition. Check out Eat Their LunchMature buyers have more realistic expectations and are more inclined to work with you. You want to be the one who takes the training wheels off, not the one who puts them on.last_img read more

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