China’s New World Media Order, by Christophe Deloire and Wu’er Kaixi

first_imgEven in places where press freedom remains legally protected, China is interfering with its citizens’ ability to make informed choices about public policy. From Sweden to Australia, Chinese embassies are pressuring Western media outlets to censor their own reporting. Meanwhile, the authorities are buying sponsored content in leading Western publications, and continuing to invest in their global propaganda apparatus. RSF_en FranceChinaEurope – Central AsiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesMedia independence InternetFreedom of expression Help by sharing this information Press freedom, one of the main demands of the Tiananmen demonstrators, is officially guaranteed by Article 35 of the Chinese constitution. Yet the Communist Party of China (CPC) and its state apparatus still routinely flout this provision. Thirty years ago this month, thousands of peaceful demonstrators were massacred in Beijing and across China for courageously standing up to an authoritarian regime. The world’s democracies owe it to these individuals to show similar courage today, as they defend press freedom – and democracy itself – worldwide. Read “China’s New World Media Order” by Wu’er Kaixi and Christophe Deloire, published in partnership with Project Syndicate. Self-confidence has replaced the self-consciousness that some Chinese leaders felt in the aftermath of the Tiananmen massacre. Today, the regime is proudly promoting its authoritarian model around the world. The new world media order that it is attempting to build is less well-known than the Belt and Road Initiative, but just as ambitious. News Receive email alerts June 3, 2019 – Updated on December 17, 2019 China’s New World Media Order, by Christophe Deloire and Wu’er Kaixi Already, the CPC has begun exporting its repressive methods by means of major international conferences, such as the World Media Summit and the World Internet Conference. In Southeast Asia, legislative reforms aimed at restricting press freedom are patterned on Chinese laws, and many journalists are being invited to learn “journalism with Chinese characteristics.” June 7, 2021 Find out more Such concerted resistance would honor those who have paid the ultimate price for defending freedom of information in China, such as Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, whom the Chinese government left to die in detention. It would also honor the more than 100 journalists detained today in life-threatening conditions, including RSF award-winner Huang Qi and the photographer Lu Guang, who received numerous prizes for his work on social and environmental issues in China. This op-ed has been written and published in collaboration with the Project Syndicate. The world’s democracies must move beyond their myopic competition for China’s favor and come together to resist its alternative authoritarian vision. This means mounting an ambitious, persistent, and coordinated response that defends the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. News RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan We must not hesitate to fight back against those who attack press freedom. We must raise our voices to condemn the abuses that strike at our values. And we must do it now. Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says June 8, 2021 Find out more to go further June 4, 2021 Find out more “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says With its media-repression campaign, China is capitalizing on divisions within the world’s democracies. It is finding the cracks in societies’ commitment to democratic values, such as tolerance and openness, and attempting to rend them open with propaganda promoting its own political tenets. Its leaders know that, when journalists are silenced, the alternatives to authoritarianism are gradually extinguished. After all, it is impossible to foster constructive political debate when questioning the official view is a punishable offense. PARIS – Since the Tiananmen Square massacre 30 years ago, China has achieved extraordinary economic development. Yet, contrary to the expectations of many Western leaders and analysts, the country has not gradually embraced press freedom or respect for civil rights. On the contrary: as a recent Reporters Without Borders (RSF) report shows, China today is actively working to build a repressive “new world media order” – an initiative that poses a clear and present danger to the world’s democracies. Organisation News News On July 10 and 11, leading defenders of press freedom from around the world will meet at the Global Conference for Media Freedom in London. They must take this opportunity not just to reaffirm core principles, but also to rally together to build barriers to China’s media influence, and to end impunity for press-freedom violations. In fact, China is one of the world’s leading jailers of journalists, and ranks 177th of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. The “Great Firewall of China,” an ultra-sophisticated Internet-filtering system, limits the access of most of China’s 830 million Internet users, and the CPC has no qualms about pressuring publishers and social-media platforms to censor themselves. China now openly rejects the Universal Declaration of Human Rights with rhetoric about “social harmony” and the “relativity of values.” Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia FranceChinaEurope – Central AsiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesMedia independence InternetFreedom of expression last_img read more

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Going Home Again

first_imgA steep mountain road Brings a Runner Back to His Roots“You OK, son?”It’s mid-October of 2003—one of those crystal-clear fall afternoons that never seems to end—and an older man in a sedan has pulled up beside me on Georgia Highway 180 Spur. The two-lane blacktop snakes its way up Brasstown Bald, the highest point in the state, and I’ve decided to try running the three miles from its base at Jack’s Gap all the way to the thimble-shaped observation tower at the summit.“Oh, yeah. I’m fine. I just—” I wheeze as he interrupts me, asking if I need a ride. I’m hardly a mile up the highway, and he’s worried. Things aren’t going well.That run up Brasstown 15 years ago was the first of many I’d take while I attended college just a few miles down the road. In fact, those trips became a near-weekly occurrence: aim the car north, find a rock station broadcasting out of Atlanta, and wind my way on mostly empty state highways into the cluster of high mountains the next county over.And then there was the run itself. The climb up Brasstown is a beast, ascending at grades approaching 20 percent—a road steep enough to give pro cyclists fits during the Tour de Georgia in the early 2000s. Running to the summit just felt like you’d accomplished something badass, even in the age before a selfie was needed to make an outdoor trip complete.Looking back, I’m not sure why my runs up Brasstown became a thing. Maybe it was an escape from studying, or maybe it was a chance to get my mind off of stumbling my way into adulthood. Maybe it wasn’t even the running at all but the chance to get out alone in the mountains for awhile. One of my friends says that you never feel more alive than when you’re driving a little too fast down a southern backroad with the windows down and the radio blaring. He’s not wrong.Even though I and everything else around it had changed, the mountain—and the struggle of climbing it—was the same. And when it comes to why we get outdoors in the first place, isn’t that the point?Regardless of the reason, that feeling didn’t last. I eventually started a career and moved from visiting the mountains once a week to living in them, albeit a few hours north in Virginia. And over time, driving into the mountains quit being so special. It’s a feeling that all of us who live in the Blue Ridge risk. Our favorite parks and trails can become all too familiar, and the hills that once seemed so striking on our horizon can become just another part of the landscape. Today, I’ll often catch myself grumbling through traffic on my way to the trailhead after work to squeeze in an evening run.I never really thought about that change until this past winter, when a work trip put me back in Georgia and not too far from Brasstown. I ended up with a free afternoon, so I pointed the car north again and headed for the mountains just like I’d done years earlier. I wasn’t sure how it would turn out. The world seems angrier now, my understanding of it a bit wearier, and my body an undisclosed amount of weight heavier than when I made that first run up the mountain as a teenager. As I drove into the hills, I fumbled around for that old rock station but ended up finding someone shouting over political talk radio instead.I wish I could report that my return to Brasstown went well, but it didn’t. I started out from Jack’s Gap too fast, forgot my pacing, and blew up midway through a particularly steep grunt where the road angles right up the nose of the ridge. I walked, cussed, and trotted at intervals from there.At the top, though, I remembered why I made those runs so many years ago. In 15 years’ time, not much was different on the summit. The Brasstown Wilderness still cloaked the ridges surrounding the lookout, while the Blue Ridge gradually faded to the Piedmont to my south. Lake Chatuge glittered in the valley below. Even though I and everything else around it had changed, the mountain—and the struggle of climbing it—was the same. And when it comes to why we get outdoors in the first place, isn’t that the point?Maybe I’m just turning this essay into a therapy session, but maybe that’s also one of the many things the mountains can be. A few weeks after my trip to Georgia, I was sitting through an especially dull workday when that run up Brasstown came to mind. I snuck out of the office early, but this time I headed for the highest summit in the county instead of the park where I do my usual evening run. I left the car in a pull-out at the base of the mountain and began climbing an approach road that led to a lookout tower a couple of thousand feet higher up. It wasn’t Brasstown, but it was close enough.This run didn’t go any better, but as I eased around a sharp curve, an engine revved behind me. A pickup crept up the road, and a concerned voice called out from the driver’s seat.“You alright?”For a moment, it didn’t matter what mountain I was on. Everything clicked into place, and a goofy smile flashed across my face. “Oh, yeah,” I yelled back. “Everything’s fine.”last_img read more

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First time buyers are flocking to this affordable inner-city hotspot

first_imgThe home at 11 Oxford St, Nundah.Back on the market for the first time in 11 years, this three-bedroom Californian-style bungalow sold before auction for $865,000.Inside 11 Oxford St, Nundah.Marketing agent Leigh Kortlang of Ray White Ascot said the new owners, a young couple, fell in love with the stylish yet relaxed character of 19 Oxford St, Nundah.“It features a unique blend of old-world charm and modern amenity, which the new owners found appealing,” she said.“They plan to move in right away.”Inside 11 Oxford St, Nundah.More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019Ms Kortlang said there was a lot of interest in the property.“We had around 120 people inspect the property.“I think that speaks really highly of the area,” she said.Inside 11 Oxford St, Nundah.“This home is a great representation of Nundah. It’s become a very vibrant, bustling place.“There’s a lot more happening here now, and people are starting to notice.”Inside 11 Oxford St, Nundah.Ms Kortlang said this has helped the market in the area in recent years.“We’re seeing a lot of young couples and families buying in the area because it’s affordable, and there’s a lot of potential for growth.”last_img read more

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Serena Williams returns, Fed Cup ‘start of a long process’

first_imgThe U.S. will have Venus Williams take on Arantxa Rus and CoCo Vandeweghe will face Richel Hogerkamp on Saturday as it opens its Fed Cup title defense. Sunday’s scheduled singles matches have Venus Williams facing Hogerkamp and Vandeweghe taking on Rus.But this weekend’s headline is the return of Serena Williams, who participated in a Dec. 30 exhibition match but otherwise hasn’t played since that 2017 Australian Open.Williams said Friday she’s unsure about how she will manage her schedule and whether she will play all three remaining Grand Slam events this year. Williams’ 23 Grand Slam singles titles put her one behind the record held by Margaret Court.“I have long-term goals obviously, but right now my main goal is just to stay in the moment,” Williams said. “It goes unsaid (that) 25 is obviously something that I would love, but I’d hate to limit myself.”Williams’ daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr., was born Sept. 1. Williams who is married to Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, said motherhood is “an amazing journey.”ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH “It’s probably been the most fun of my life,” she said. “It’s a totally new experience. I love motherhood, and I look forward to just being the best mom I can be.”Williams said she has benefited from having her sister alongside her as she attempts this comeback.“She’s been really, really positive,” Williams said. “There (are) moments that have just been hard, just getting back out there and doing it every day. You have to get used to that and get in the rhythm of that. I’ve been able to really rely on her for that.”Venus Williams has been impressed with her younger sister’s parenting skills.“I think she’s the best mother I ever saw,” Venus Williams said. “She’s amazing. She does everything herself.”Venus Williams was asked how motherhood had changed her sister.“She might go out a little less,” Venus said before breaking into a grin. “But she’s definitely remained just very youthful and childlike at heart. I think sometimes motherhood changes people in a way that they become less young and more serious, but that hasn’t affected her.”Serena Williams acknowledged there have been “a lot of ups and downs” in her comeback as she mentioned “fighting against all odds to be out there and to be competing again.”She mentioned there are “moments that have just been hard, getting back out there doing it every day.” Williams had told Vogue magazine that she developed several small blood clots in her lungs after her daughter was born.Williams had opted against trying to defend her Australian Open title this year. “I think she’s smart to take her time and not to play Australia,” ESPN analyst and 18-time Grand Slam singles champion Chris Evert said last week. “Playing Fed Cup and easing her way back with exhibitions. Maybe she wants to peak for Wimbledon, that would be her best chance at a Grand Slam.”Williams said the Fed Cup represents an ideal setting for her return. Not only does it allow her to practice alongside a few different players, it also enables her coach and teammates to offer different perspectives on her progress.“It actually is a really perfect opportunity to try to come back,” Williams said. Serena Williams of the US Jelena returns the ball to Ostapenko of Latvia during the Mubadala World Tennis Championship 2017 match in Abu Dhabi, on December 30, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / NEZAR BALOUTASHEVILLE, N.C. — Tennis fans anxiously awaiting Serena Williams’ return to competitive tennis will have to wait one more day.Williams won’t be playing in either of Saturday’s Fed Cup singles matches as she makes her comeback five months after becoming a mother. Williams teams up with Lauren Davis to face Lesley Kerkhove and Demi Schuurs of the Netherlands in Sunday’s doubles match.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers MOST READ AFP official booed out of forum Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMCcenter_img Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH “It’s definitely the start of a long process,” Williams said. “Physically, I feel good. Every day, I get better and I get stronger. That’s just something I always keep telling myself every day, I have to get better.”Williams, 36, hasn’t played an official match since winning the 2017 Australian Open. Williams later revealed she was pregnant during that tournament.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAlthough Williams isn’t scheduled to play any singles matches this weekend, that could change. U.S. captain Kathy Rinaldi has the right to change her Sunday lineup after Saturday’s play.“We’ll wait and see how tomorrow goes and then we’ll make our adjustments, if any,” Rinaldi said Friday. WATCH: Wade receives standing ovation in Heat return Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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New Bell Media Original Documentary YOU ARE HERE A COME FROM AWAY

center_img Login/Register With: Advertisement About HBO CanadaHBO Canada brings Canadians HBO’s current slate of signature dramatic and comedic programs, together with new and never-before-seen programming including comedy series, live specials, sporting events, behind-the-scenes content and titles from HBO’s extensive library – all in an uncut and commercial-free environment. HBO Canada is included with a subscription to The Movie Network, which is available across Canada through television service providers. HBO Canada is available in high definition on HBO Canada HD, and on HBO Canada OnDemand, a Subscription Video On Demand (SVOD) service. Throughout Canada HBO Canada programming is accessible on TMN GO, as well as on demand and online where available by service provider. For more information, please visit www.hbocanada.com. HBO Canada is a multiplex channel of The Movie Network. The Movie Network is a division of Bell Media, which is part of BCE Inc. (TSX, NYSE: BCE), Canada’s largest communications company. TORONTO – HBO Canada will present the world television premiere of YOU ARE HERE: A COME FROM AWAY STORY on the 17thanniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Tuesday, September 11, at 9 p.m. ET, it was announced today. The poignant new 84-minute Bell Media Original Documentary tells the story of how a small community in Gander, Newfoundland welcomed more than 6,500 ‘Come From Aways’ on September 11, 2001. Following its broadcast premiere, the documentary will also join CraveTV in 2019.When U.S. airspace was completely shut down in the hours following the terrorist attacks on 9/11, and all civilian airliners within reach of the U.S. were ordered to land at the nearest airport, 38 planes landed at the Gander airport. With no warning and with no time to prepare, a city of only 9,000 residents played host to more than 6,500 frightened, exhausted, and hungry passengers who “came from away” around the world.last_img read more

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Extreme heat and high surf on the way to San Diego

first_img SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Extreme heat and high surf in San Diego could cause potentially dangerous conditions at the beach and throughout the region this week, the National Weather Service reported.A large area of high pressure was predicted to build over the southwestern United States beginning Thursday, and mild temperatures mid-week will give way to soaring ones by Friday, prompting the NWS to issue an excessive heat warning for a large swath of Southern California from 11 a.m. Friday to midnight Sunday morning.Daytime temperatures will be in the upper 100s in inland San Diego County, rising to 107 in Escondido and 108 in El Cajon on Friday, the NWS predicted. Ramona was expected to see weather as hot as 110 degrees. Borrego Springs could see the mercury top 114 degrees.The coast will be a little more bearable, with temperatures predicted to be in the upper 70s to low 80s from Oceanside to Imperial Beach.Meanwhile, high surf from Hurricane Fabio, currently about 700 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, was expected to create strong rip currents and hazardous swimming conditions.The NWS placed San Diego County beaches under a high surf advisory, set to go into effect at 6 p.m. Wednesday night and last until 9 p.m. Friday.Surf levels of 7-9 feet and as high as 12 feet will be possible in Orange and northern San Diego counties, forecasters said. Surf south of Carlsbad will be lower, around 3-5 feet, but strong longshore currents will still be hazardous to swimmers.Swell and surf should gradually subside this weekend, the NWS said. July 4, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Posted: July 4, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Extreme heat and high surf on the way to San Diego KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

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