National PTSD Center opens at VA in White River Jct

first_imgThe new headquarters building of the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder was officially opened today on the campus of the VA Medical Center at White River Junction. Vermont Senators Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders took part in a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the facility, which they say acknowledges the extent of PTSD and the the federal government’s commitment to helping veterans.The senators noted that the new Headquarters Building is the hub of what has become an extensive VA-wide PTSD research and education network — parallel to the direct care that veterans receive in VA medical facilities — which acts on the nation’s long-term commitment to look after those who have served once they return home.“I can’t say enough about the work done by the men and women of the National Center for PTSD,” said Leahy, who, as a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has championed investments in the Center to address PTSD cases among troops returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.  “We used to think of PTSD as something faced only by Vietnam veterans.  So many of our troops coming home today also suffer from PTSD.  It is more important than ever for us to look after those who have done and given so much for their fellow citizens and who now suffer from the invisible wounds of war.”Sanders, a member of the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, said, “At a time when studies tell us that over 300,000 or nearly one out of every five service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan report symptoms of PTSD or major depression, expanding and improving the nation’s leader in PTSD research is the least we can do. We must do everything we can to make sure our brave men and women in uniform receive the care they need when they return from war.”During their remarks at the Center, Leahy and Sanders renewed their commitment to supporting the Center in both the VA authorization and appropriations processes.Sanders worked closely with the chairman of the veterans committee, Sen. Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii), to bolster the budget for the White River Junction facility.  On January 24, 2008, they sent a letter to then-VA Sec. James Peake regarding the Center’s increased workload and relatively flat budget in recent years.  Sanders also met with the VA secretary personally to raise the issue again, along with other health care-related concerns. Over several years Leahy has requested and received millions of dollars in budget increases for the National Center at White River Junction.  In two of the past four years he secured language encouraging the VA to lift the Center’s budget to match its broad responsibilities.  At Leahy’s prompting the VA in 2009 was encouraged to increase the Center’s budget by $2 million.  Leahy is pressing in this year’s VA appropriations bill to further sharpen VA’s focus on the needs of PTSD-stricken combat veterans.Leahy said, “It has always been a source of purpose and pride to participate in the work of this Center.  Senator Sanders and I will continue to work with others in the Senate to make sure the Center is the priority, within VA, and within Congress, that it needs to be.”The VA established the National Center for PTSD in response to a 1984 congressional mandate (PL98-528) to address the needs of veterans with military-related PTSD.  The National Center’s mission is to enhance medical research and education on PTSD.  Convinced that no single VA site could adequately serve this unique mission, VA established the Center as a consortium of five divisions.  The Center currently consists of seven VA academic centers of excellence across the United States, with headquarters in White River Junction.  Other divisions are located in Boston, Mass.; West Haven, Conn.; Palo Alto, Calif.; and Honolulu, Hawaii. Source: Leahy and Sanders. 10.12.2010# # # # #last_img read more

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Beware the secret saboteur in your credit union

first_imgI don’t have time to answer the phone beyond saying my name or “credit union”. There are too many other things I need to do. Wanting me to sell is not what I signed on for. I do transactions fast and accurately. Salespeople sell, tellers do transactions. A patient complained that a roommate was dying noisily and therefor he was unable to sleep all night. That became a nurse’s fault. These are just a few examples of potential dissatisfaction and misunderstanding that a skillful secret saboteur can easily use against your best efforts to initiate effective and beneficial change within your organization. The problem in both types of organizations is identical. The reasons for change and implementation of those changes have not been properly explained, motivated, coached, and monitored. Beyond that, and here is the hard part, when a person fails to embrace those changes they have not been helped to find a job where they will fit in.You see, if the roommate of the dying person would have had it explained to him that a critically and possibly terminal case was going to be in the next bed, and all possible would be done to limit that patient’s care becoming a problem to him, it may well have diminished his irritation. Perhaps not, but it certainly would have been worth the effort. The unhappy owner of the sweet tooth could have been told of her choices in a positive way. If okayed by the doctor, she may have been allowed to have a family member or friend bring some of her favorite sweetener to her. A dietician, speaking to the patient in advance of the surgery, could have counseled the unhappy delicatessen connoisseur on the reasons behind the foods and portions he would be receiving. Managing expectations and doing so in a friendly manner can often help reduce later anger, resistance to change and conflict.In the credit union environment proving people wrong about not wanting to use a professional, albeit eight second longer, telephone greeting, standing and greeting people at a member service desk with a smile, introduction and handshake, identifying member needs and helping them decide to take sensible action to meet the want or need (selling through service) are similar issues to those listed for hospitals in one key way. The issue?, resistance to change. Finding exceptions to the rule is always an easy way out for self-justification for resistance to change. The effective leader is a proactive advocate for change. He or she must be able to seek out and destroy secret saboteurs before they can do irreparable harm to the culture shift.Pointing out, forcefully, how taking any of the little steps required in the culture change action plan will benefit patients and families, or credit union members and their families will help discourage and limit the effectiveness of the secret saboteur. Find stories to tell and ways to help people visualize the effectiveness of each new action you are asking them to take that forcefully demonstrate the effects of those changes. Find and help champions of your new direction and assign them with seeking out the naysaying hidden saboteurs in their departments. With the help of those champions you can find ways to bring home your message along with the need to change. Educate everyone, coach everyone, assess everyone, reteach and coach everyone, until the hidden saboteur either shows himself or changes. If he shows himself and refuses to change you must cut out the cancer before it spreads.I will provide one example of a resisted change I had to surmount early in my tenure at Healthcare Systems Federal Credit Union. I wrote a brief telephone greeting for everyone to use. “Good morning (or afternoon, thank you for calling Healthcare Systems Federal Credit Union. My name isc (insert your name). How may I help you today?”. The pushback was terrible. Only one person embraced the change.One by one I brought each employee into my office and had them answer an imaginary phone call in their own manner. I timed each answer. Average time, three seconds. It doesn’t take long to say good morning, or credit union, or Tamie speaking. Then I had them read my script and had them smile when they did. Oh, were some of those smiles forced! Average time, eleven seconds. Then I asked them each if it was worth eight seconds to make a member feel important, welcomed, and sense that the person on the other end of the phone wanted to help them. They could not say no. So, we rehearsed until it became second nature, Soon members were coming in and telling them how much more professional they sounded. Hey told our member service team members how much more they liked calling! When that happened all but one person fully embraced the change. Eventually that person left. Before she left she tried all she could to destroy the changes, but the reinforcement the team received from our members made her efforts useless.The demise of the secret saboteur will happen when leaders help people understand that no change is ever universally effective at first, if ever. We are after all dealing with people. Additionally, if we are to make the influence of secret saboteurs minimal we must demonstrate how complying with the changes will make things better over time. Most importantly, we must help people visualize how much better things will be by using stories and real life situations. For when good people truly get together to do the right things for the right reasons almost anything is possible. His nurse was not treating him fairly because my pastrami sandwich had too little pastrami on it after receiving quadruple bypass surgery. He or she lurks hidden inside of almost every organization. They smile at you. They nod in agreement when you make bold statements of purpose. They cheerlead when you announce new initiatives. Meanwhile, when out of your sight and hearing ranges, whenever any opportunity arises, wherever weakness or uncertainty in another person seems to exist, the secret saboteur promotes dissatisfaction among your team members. They place mines between your leadership, your purposes, and your initiatives and your team members. Unseen and unheard by you, the secret saboteur is actively eating away at your corporate structure, purpose, and goals. Fail to find the secret saboteur at your own peril.Just as credit unions are struggling to adjust to meet new challenges presented by changing technology, regulations, generational preferences. and member expectations, so too are hospitals. Faced with increased regulation, mandatory and published independent satisfaction surveys, new and more restrictive insurance rules for repayment, and greater competition, hospitals are spending great treasure in time and money transforming their cultures. Now, patient and family satisfaction is something to which they can no longer give mere lip service. Many, as I have noted in a previous article, are doing a remarkable job of navigating the mines faced by any organization attempting to make fundamental changes to its culture. Yet, as time goes on, it is becoming apparent that hidden saboteurs often lurk within the depths of the organization.This point was driven home to me in an article I recently read written by a physician who quoted liberally from an article written by a nurse. The original article appeared in “ATLANTIC”. The author of the original piece titled, “The Problem With Satisfied Patients”, Alexandra Robbins, went after patient and family satisfaction and its measurement by survey with a vengeance. Unfortunately, her protests were ever so familiar to me. I had heard similar protests and occasionally still do hear them from bankers and credit union employees. As I read the article written by the physician, Dr. Alex Smith, I thought it might be useful to examine the complaints against customer service in hospitals and compare them to what I have observed in credit unions that were attempting to become more member focused.Examples of why some believe it is unwise to force nurses and other hospital employees to try to be more customer/patient focused and their approximate equivalences in credit unions follow:center_img The hospital doesn’t have the sweetener she likes in her coffee. Nurse says it isn’t her job to keep her sweet tooth happy. HOSPITALSCREDIT UNIONS 88SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Brad Roteman Brad Roteman has served HSFCU since February 2005. He is a former district sales manager with Bankers Systems, Inc., now Walters Klewer Financial Services. Brad has won numerous awards for … Web: www.hsfcu1.org Details Standing and greeting with a handshake and smile isn’t me. I just do my job and they like me.last_img read more

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Adonis Stevenson’s condition improving ‘towards stable’ after Oleksandr Gvozdyk knockout

first_imgJoin DAZN and watch Canelo Alvarez vs. Rocky Fielding on Dec. 15But Michel posted on Twitter on Sunday to say the 41-year-old had recently improved.”Update on Adonis @AdonisSuperman: The state of Adonis has gone from critical towards stable from yesterday to today which is relatively good news. He is in controlled sedation to facilitate his recuperation,” Michel wrote. “His family, his wife Simone and Groupe Yvon Michel would like to thank the many people who have taken the time to send comforting messages. New information will be published as we get it. No other comments will be made until then.” Adonis Stevenson’s condition is improving “towards stable”, according to the boxer’s promoter Yvon Michel.Stevenson lost his WBC light-heavyweight belt on Saturday night after being knocked out in the 11th round by Oleksandr Gvozdyk. The Canadian was carried from the ring on a stretcher and taken to hospital, where his condition was initially described as critical.last_img read more

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Portugal, Mexico, Russia tussle for Confed Cup semi-final berths

first_img– ‘Brave’ –Like he did before the Mexico game, Hudson called on the Kiwis to be “brave” against the European champions.This will be the first senior meeting between Portugal, ranked eighth in the world, and New Zealand, who are 95th — sandwiched between Guatemala and Madagascar.The Kiwis, appearing at the Confederations Cup for the fourth time, are still hunting their first win in the tournament after just one draw and 10 defeats.They gave the Mexicans a scare in Sochi with Leeds striker Chris Wood giving New Zealand a shock first-half lead.It was their first goal in 555 minutes of Confederations Cup football, but Mexico’s Raul Jimenez and Oribe Peralta struck in the second half as the Kiwis faded.“We took a great side all the way against Mexico and we can do that against Portugal,” said Wood.“If we play like we did the other night, I have all the confidence in the world.”Russia need to beat Mexico in Kazan to avoid their prospects hinging on a Portugal loss, while a point would be enough for the Mexicans to advance.After the draw with Portugal, Mexico coach Juan Carlos Osorio made eight changes against New Zealand, a plan that initially backfired before his side recovered after the break.Star striker Javier Hernandez, left out against New Zealand, is expected to start while Osorio must replace the injured Carlos Salcedo and Hector Moreno in defence.“We are extremely confident,” said Osorio.“For us it was very important to get three points against New Zealand and now against the hosts we feel that we have a great chance.”Russia coach Stanislav Cherchesov said he will decide his starting line-up after training with an electric atmosphere expected for the national team’s first game at the Kazan Arena. Ronaldo likely to be restedSochi, Russia | AFP |  Portugal are set to rest Cristiano Ronaldo for Saturday’s clash against New Zealand as the Euro 2016 winners look to clinch their place in next week’s Confederations Cup semi-finals.Ronaldo brushed off allegations of tax evasion in Spain with man-of-the-match performances in the 2-2 draw with Mexico and 1-0 victory over hosts Russia, when he scored the winner.Fernando Santos is expected to rotate his squad, leaving out the likes of Ronaldo against the already-eliminated Kiwis.New AC Milan signing Andre Silva should lead Portugal’s attack in Saint Petersburg, where Portugal will be the heavy favourites.“We have to manage the players and there will be rotation based on how the players are feeling, but it’s easy when you have a group you trust,” said Santos.“I’m not going to say whether Ronaldo will play or not, because I don’t want our opponents to know.“New Zealand gave Mexico a few problems and we will have to be on our toes,” he added. The All Whites lost 2-1 to Mexico on Wednesday despite having led at half-time.Santos said left-back Raphael Guerreiro is ruled out with a bruised foot, and not a fractured leg, as was first thought after Wednesday’s narrow win over Russia.“He told us he could have a small fracture, fortunately it is not as serious an injury, but he won’t play tomorrow,” said Santos.Things remain tight in Group A before Saturday’s final round.Mexico are top, level with Portugal on four points but ahead by virtue of having scored one more goal, and face Russia, who are just a point behind in third.New Zealand will have to settle for the chance to play the role of spoiler after losing both their games so far.The Kiwis will breathe a slight sigh of relief if Ronaldo is rested, with the Real Madrid star netting 15 times in his last nine matches for club and country.“Even if you take Ronaldo out of the team, you still have world-class players like (Ricardo) Quaresma and Nani, we have a game plan and we won’t be overawed,” said coach Anthony Hudson.“The Portuguese probably don’t want to be playing New Zealand right now.” Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Guardiola says Man City aren’t new Invincibles

first_imgShare on: WhatsApp Sunday’s game against Arsenal is set to be the first time Alexis Sanchez faces City since a £60 million ($78.4 million, 67.5 million euros) move to the Etihad Stadium fell through at the end of August.Guardiola refused to be drawn on the prospect of resurrecting that deal, either in January or at the end of the season, when the Chile international’s contract runs out.“The transfer window is closed, so it’s not time to talk about that,” Guardiola said.“I have respect for Arsenal and especially for my own players. In the period that the transfer window is open, I leave other people to talk about that.“You know my opinion on the players I have. On Alexis, you know my opinion, but he’s an Arsenal player so it’s not correct to talk about that, especially before we play them.”Guardiola believes City should be wary not just of Sanchez, but also of Mesut Ozil, another point in a three-pronged attack that also features Alexandre Lacazette.Ozil, like Sanchez, is out of contract next year, but has faced criticism for a lack of goals and assists this season.“I don’t have doubts about him, first in terms of quality,” said Guardiola, who came up against Ozil during his time as Barcelona coach.“I enjoy him and have suffered from him at Real Madrid and here. He gets criticised when the team loses. He is a big target when they lose. But I admire him.“Maybe his body language doesn’t help him too much, but sometimes that confuses the opinion of the critics.“I don’t have doubts about his quality. It’s good for the Premier League to have players of this talent, but hopefully on Sunday he can play a bad, bad, bad game.” Manchester, United Kingdom | AFP |  Pep Guardiola has promised Arsene Wenger that Manchester City have no chance of emulating his Arsenal team’s 2003/04 record of completing a Premier League season unbeaten.Arsenal were dubbed the ‘Invincibles’ after becoming only the second team — after Preston North End in 1888/89 — to go through an English top-flight campaign without losing a game.City are unbeaten after 10 games of the league season, but Wenger has suggested it will be difficult for them to match his side’s achievement and City boss Guardiola agrees with the Arsenal manager.“I would like to say to Arsene that this record belongs to him. We are not going to break it,” Guardiola said on Friday ahead of his side’s home game with Arsenal on Sunday.“He has to be calm. He has to be sure that is not going to happen. It was an exceptional team.“To stay unbeaten in the Premier League is something fantastic. He has to know that we don’t want to break this record, but we want to play well and beat them on Sunday.”City have not lost any of their 16 competitive games this season, winning 14 of them and beating Wolverhampton Wanderers on penalties after a draw in the League Cup.They sit five points clear at the top of the table, but Guardiola played down Chelsea manager Antonio Conte’s suggestion that City are on course for the title.“We are five points ahead of Manchester United,” he told reporters at City’s Manchester training base.“How many games are left? Twenty-eight. How many points? Eighty-four. We are five in front. It is nothing.“If you say that until next May we are going to play like we have in the last two months, I’d say: ‘Wow, we have a good chance to win the Premier League’. But who is going to assure me we will not get injuries?“Even for the best teams in the world it’s hard to maintain what we have done over the last two months.”– Ozil admiration –last_img read more

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Holmdel’s New Mayor Is Greg Buontempo

first_imgStory and photo by Joseph SapiaHOLMDEL – In what came as a surprise to some Tuesday night, the governing body unanimously elected a new leader from among its committee members at its annual reorganization meeting.Committeeman Greg Buontempo will succeed Eric Hinds, who has been a high-profile presence as the township observes redevelopment of the 472-acre Bell Works site, holds a public vote on turf fields for Cross Farm Park, and fights JCPL’s proposed power line project along the railroad right-of-way.This is Buontempo’s final year of his second three-year term. “Thank you all for your confidence in me to lead Holmdel Township for the next year,” Buontempo said. Perhaps things did not go as smoothly as they could have for the all-Republican Township Committee. A few residents addressed the committee, speaking in praise of outgoing Mayor Eric Hinds, who is beginning his third three-year term on the committee.Hinds had acknowledged he would have liked to have been selected mayor again for the third straight year.“It’s never easy (relinquishing the mayor’s seat),” Hinds said. “It’s the way the system works. I can be disappointed, but I understand it. “Of course, I want to be mayor,” Hinds said. “(But) I support Greg and move forward.”Hinds said some did not understand that although Hinds held the mayor’s seat when he was running in last year’s election, he was not running for mayor, but for a committee seat.“I voted for him (Hinds) to be mayor,” resident Paul Andersen told the committee. “I feel my vote was not utilized in the way it was cast.”Buontempo agreed some did not understand the township committee form of government, which also is in place in neighboring Hazlet, Middletown and Colts Neck.Under the township committee form of New Jersey municipal government, voters in Holmdel elect five members at large for staggered, three year terms, which begin the first week in January. At the annual reorganization meeting, the five committee members select who among them will be mayor and deputy mayor for the coming year. While the mayoral title carries a leadership role and prestige, along with some powers, the committee essentially is a roundtable with all members having equal power under the law.Buontempo said the township committee form of government “was a learning experience” when he first encountered it.Committeeman Patrick Impreveduto, a former mayor, was elected deputy mayor by his four colleagues with Impreveduto abstaining.In his mayoral remarks, Buontempo talked about progress being made in town at the Bell Works site, formerly Bell Labs until about 10 years ago, on Crawfords Corner Road. Companies moving to the multi-use commercial site include JCP&L and software maker iCIMS. One million square feet of commercial space will be active at Bell Works in the next two or three years, Buontempo said.Also, the Holmdel branch of the Monmouth County Library is to relocate from the basement of Town Hall to Bell Works in late 2017 or early 2018. At Bell Works, the branch’s size will be 17,000 square feet, a jump from its current 2,500.“It’s going to be part library, part learning center, part historical museum,” Buontempo said.The museum will trace Bell Labs’ work in the township in a display “threaded through the library,” said Buontempo, explaining the committee came up with the idea. He said the museum is envisioned as both placards of information and physical objects on display.“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Buontempo said. Somerset Development, the owner-developer of Bell Works, will provide $1 million toward the estimated $1.5 million to $1.6 million renovation of the library on the second floor of the six-story, 2-million-square-foot former Bell Labs building. The township will be responsible for the rest of the money.Also, Somerset Development is giving the township a free perpetual lease for the library.On Thursday, Jan. 12, an informational session will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Bell Works on the library project, Bountempo said.Buontempo was sworn in as mayor by Freeholder Serena DiMaso, a Holmdel resident and former mayor.Impreveduto could not fully raise his right hand when he was sworn in as deputy mayor because his arm was in a sling from recent shoulder surgery. He injured the shoulder months ago in a fall.When state Senator Joseph M. Kyrillos Jr. swore in Impreveduto, the senator joked about him having his “right fingers raised,” rather than his right arm and hand.The committee honored Hinds with his service as mayor with a proclamation, which prompted a standing ovation.Hinds looked back at being mayor in 2016. He said accomplishments included an online township newsletter, a town-wide cleanup and a career night for students.“I tried to attend a ton of events and bring the community together,” Hinds said. But he will not rest now that he does not have the mayor’s position. “It’s not my nature to sit back,” Hinds said.Joe Crowley, a resident, told the committee, “I would like to thank Eric for all his passion to the community.”Hinds and Committeeman Michael Nikolis, both winners in November, were sworn into their new terms by Kyrillos and DiMaso, respectively. Also in attendance at the organization was state Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon.Appointments included:Township attorney: Michael L. Collins of the Archer and Greiner firmPlanner: Jennifer BeahmEngineer: Edward G. Broberg of T&M AssociatesAuditor: Robert AllisonJudge: Mary CaseyProsecutor: The Citta, Holzapfel and Zabarsky firmPublic defender: Raymond RayaCode enforcement officer: Loni LucinaZoning Officer and Fire inspector: David OlsenPurchasing agent: Barbara KoveleskyHistorian: Rhonda Beck-Edwardslast_img read more

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Local Lawyer Takes Racetrack’s Sports Betting Case To U.S. Supreme Court

first_imgBy John Burton |LITTLE SILVER — The future of Monmouth Park could rest in the hands of lawyer and Two River area resident Ronald J. Riccio as he prepares to offer arguments to the U.S. Supreme Court later this year.Riccio, who lives in Little Silver, is continuing to prepare for his turn at what is often considered a highpoint of a legal career, getting to present a case before the nine members of the nation’s highest court, squaring off before some other heavy-hitting legal talent.This will be his first appearance before the Supreme Court during his 47-year legal career, “So, this is very exciting,” he said.“I think it would be safe to say,” offered Riccio, who is 71, “every lawyer would relish the opportunity to have a case before the U.S. Supreme Court.”But, he stressed, this is quite a serious matter that has both constitutional importance and real world ramifications.“So, this is not just some academic discussion on constitutional principles,” he maintained. “There are people who are depending on the successful outcome of this case and live with the threat of losing their livelihoods hanging over their heads every day.”The case at hand concerns a longstanding legal battle over preventing New Jersey, and most other states, from allowing sports betting. Advocates for the Monmouth Park racetrack, including the New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, one of the operators of Monmouth Park and Riccio’s client, have long stressed the track needs the infusion of cash that sports betting as an attraction would bring to the financially struggling racetrack.He and the state’s legal representative are challenging the 1992 federal law, the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, or PASPA. That law, ironically, was sponsored 25 years ago by then New Jersey’s Democratic U.S. Senator Bill “Dollar Bill” Bradley, a former professional basketball player. The law was enacted over concerns about the effects sports gambling would have on the integrity of the games and the public. The law, however, did exempt four states from the prohibition: Nevada, Oregon, Delaware and Montana.In 2011, New Jersey voters approved a referendum to amend its constitution, allowing the Legislature to approve sports gambling at its casinos and at current and/or former racetracks in 2012.But that law was successfully challenged in federal court by the National Football League (NFL), National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL), Major League Baseball (MLB) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The issue has been going back and forth in the state Legislature, with the approval of bills allowing the process to move forward, and in the federal courts, where the leagues continued to win, stymieing state efforts.Riccio has argued, and will continue to make the case in written briefs and in his planned oral arguments to the court, that this rises to a constitutional issue the highest court needs to address.It boils down to state’s sovereignty, argues Riccio, who had taught constitutional law at Seton Hall Law School for 20 years, as well as serving as the school’s dean from 1988 to 1999. “What the federal government can’t do,” he said, “it can’t command the state to regulate the people in the states the way Congress wants the states to regulate them.” Under federal law that’s referred to as “commandeering,” forcing the state to take action it wouldn’t otherwise take. “Can the federal government dictate to the states how the states regulate their people?” is the issue at hand, he said. “And the answer is no,” according to Riccio, as it would violate the U.S. Constitution’s 10th Amendment. That amendment designates powers not specifically delegated to the federal government, nor prohibited by it, to the states.The sports leagues have continued to argue that allowing sports betting jeopardizes the integrity of the games.Representatives from the sports leagues did not immediately return calls and emails seeking comment for this story.Riccio dismisses the leagues’ argument as “hypercritical,” “because of the way the leagues have conducted themselves.” He points to the fact that the former Oakland Raiders football team has plans to relocate to Las Vegas, Nevada, where betting on, or against, the team is legal; and that some of the sports leagues are now involved in fantasy leagues, where participants can bet on individual players.The other issue at hand, Riccio said, is “the human element.”“You’re talking about the entire equine industry in New Jersey that is going to get threatened, if not extinguished, if Monmouth Park had to shut down.” That includes the loss of the large number of jobs the track provides for its season, he warned.Attendance at the storied racetrack has been in decline for a number of years, with track supporters maintaining the track’s inability to provide other attractions like casino-style gaming (which surrounding states have), or sports gambling, have made it that much harder to offer larger purses. They argue it also keeps the track from attracting top-tier horses and trainers, and by extension, customers. “And without the revenue that sports betting is expected to generate,” Riccio said, “it’s going to be very difficult for Monmouth Park to survive.”In the final analysis, “It’s a doomsday scenario for the equine industry,” certainly for Monmouth County, as well as for much of the state, Riccio said, “if Monmouth Park does not survive.”Riccio serves as general counsel for the McElroy, Deutch, Mulvaney and Carpenter law firm, which has offices in Tinton Falls as well as elsewhere in the state, in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Florida. He maintains his own practice but has retired from teaching at Seton Hall.Riccio is being assisted by his colleague Elliot Berman and by Edward Hartnett, a constitutional law scholar who teaches at Seton Hall. But even with their help, Riccio conceded it is time consuming, preparing the needed briefs and getting ready to address the large number of amicus (“friend of the court”) briefs this case is expected to attract; to say nothing of the other formidable legal talent who will appear on this matter. New Jersey, which is supporting Riccio’s position, is being represented by Theodore Olsen, who was Solicitor General for President George W. Bush’s administration, and had argued before the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of then-candidate Bush for Bush v. Gore, deciding the 2000 presidential election. Representing the leagues is Paul Clement, who had worked as Solicitor General for George W. Bush after Olsen’s departure. Clement had represented the NBA for labor negotiations during the contentious 2011 player lockout.“The lawyering throughout this case has been excellent,” he noted. “At this point in time, working on the Supreme Court brief,” he said, “is constantly on my mind.”Riccio and other lawyers will submit written briefs early this fall and, while oral arguments haven’t been formally scheduled yet, Riccio suspects it will be in late November or early December. He anticipates the court will render its decision in late spring 2018.This article was first published in the August 3 – 10, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Huge Retirement Sale With Lynne’s Fashion Boutique

first_imgDon’t forget to register to win one of the Fantastic Prizes such as a 55″ T.V, Ring Video Doorbell, Ninja Air Fryer, Google Home Mini and much more. Mention this email and receive 5,000 Prize Dollars toward our Prize Giveaway.  Lynne has now chosen to retire and and move on to her next phase of life. She is holding a Retirement Celebration Sale with huge markdowns on every item. Come by, enjoy the sale, save hundreds and say goodbye to your Fashion Boutique friends. Here at Lynne’s Fashion Boutique our Huge Retirement Celebration Sale just got better! We now have discounts up to 65% off regular pricing!Now is a perfect time to browse and shop for Easter, Mother’s Day, Weddings, Formal Events or just great every day casuals. Also, don’t miss our must see selections of Imported from Thailand,  Silk Dresses and Gowns.  Hurry in to save hundreds of dollars while there is still plenty to choose from! Thirty One Years ago, Lynne Goldberg quite unexpectedly began “Dressing Women” in the Toms River area from a small first floor office building. She provided top label selections in casuals, special events and accessories. Decades and four locations of growth later, Lynne’s Fashion Boutique of Little Silver has continued to serve the community. Adorning women for Mother of the Bride or Groom, Socials as well as every day casuals has been their passion. Their selections are recognizable, highly regarded international and domestic labels.  We are located at 31 Church Street in Little Silver, NJ 07739. Open Tues-Friday 10:30am to 5:30pm Saturday from 10:30am to 4:00pmlast_img read more

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Seniors Adjust to Life in Lockdown

first_imgAs with most senior residences, Chelsea Senior Living communities closely follow New Jersey Department of Health guidelines. All employees have the personal protective equipment they need, including masks, gloves, face shields and hand sanitizer, and are screened before each shift.  To keep residents and their families in touch with one another Brighton Gardens uses iPads and schedules Facetime and Skype calls, said Rathgeber.  She chats on the phone with family and friends, and keeps busy reading, most recently Ken Follet and Robert Parker. “I have a dear friend with a lot of books,” she said. “I’m hoping to get another batch from her soon.” The hardest part of quarantine for many of the seniors, Rathgeber said, is understanding why they can’t have visitors.  With the coronavirus touching every aspect of our society, all everyone is affected. Officials, celebrities and loved ones tell us to “Stay home. Stop the spread. Save lives.”  “Communication with families is done through text, email, telephone and video venues. Our residents no longer take their meals in a communal dining room,” he said. “Their meals are delivered to their apartments.”  Some of these seniors – many of them octogenarians or older and many with pre-existing medical conditions – are struggling to accept the changes to their lives. Rose Tamburro has lived through World War II and outlived two husbands and a daughter, but she never thought she’d find herself masked and quarantined in her Lincroft apartment. It’s an unprecedented time but Plant, a widow, and her generation have weathered more: World War II, the Korean and Vietnam wars and 9/11. Plant remembers the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 when her children were young. “I was terrified,” Plant recalled. “My husband was coming home early from work. I packed the whole car – baby formulas and all. I was a wreck,” she said of her plans to flee and take cover. “We were going to drive to Pennsylvania.” Now they must rely on family, friends or volunteer groups to shop for their food. Known as the Greatest Generation, many are living alone, suddenly cut off from their activities, houses of worship, even the supermarket. Some who’ve embraced technology may be navigating how to get the news online and what to do when their grandchildren want to talk to them on something called Zoom. Rose Tamburro of Lincroft doesn’t venture out of her apartment without donning her mask. Photo by Judy O’Gorman Alvarez But she spends her time reading the newspaper, chatting with family on the phone, watching TV, cleaning her apartment and cooking. “I love to cook and I love to dance. And I do them both every day in my apartment,” she said. “I cook lamb shank, pasta fagioli, whatever.” In pre-COVID-19 days, the Middletown Senior Center would be organizing bus trips, bingo games and crafts. But nowadays, staff is checking in with seniors to see how they’re faring. Seniors living alone have tried to make the best of it though. Davis said, “It does take a village. And this hardship exemplifies the community spirit and it’s wonderfulto see.” When Barbara Plant’s grandchildren visit, they keep their distance to avoid any possible transmission of the coronavirus. Photo courtesy Pat Nelson So Plant doesn’t spend time ruminating about what she’s missing now. Sure, she’d prefer to be going to breakfast with friends, spending time with family and doing everyday activities. “But so much of that stuff is not that important,” she said. “Some seniors are very stressed,” said Alison Block, a psychologist in Oceanport. “They’re not familiar with technology, they worry they may be ‘hacked,’ and they may be having trouble ordering food online.” At Brighton Gardens in Middletown, like most long-term care and senior living community facilities, residents’ health is closely monitored. Outside visitors and group activities have been suspended and residents stay in their rooms. She points out that a person who “normally would be playing mah-jongg or bridge” has been thrust into a world without those activities. In her practice, specializing in anxiety disorders, Block said, “I’m seeing people cut off from their normal support system.” “We have amazing life enrichment managers,” said Lori Rathgeber, director of sales. “Someone goes into every single apartment, reads to them, plays a game, so that they are getting stimulation every day.” Plant said at Shadow Lake Village in Middletown, an active adult community where she lives, some residents do informal exercises in the parking lot and many of her neighbors play mah-jongg online. “We’re turning a disadvantage into something that’s new and unique.” “And then that got settled,” she said. “And it was over.” “Oh, this is serious,” she said of COVID-19. She only goes for short walks outside her building. “And I always wear my mask.” Her daughter and daughter-in-law bring groceries and hot meals so she doesn’t have to venture to the supermarket. When her grandchildren visit they stand outside the glass door. “We personally contact each member to make sure they have resources and they’re in touch with their family members,” said Kourtney Davis, Middletown Senior Center supervisor.  “If the weather is good, I’ll walk with a girlfriend – but she’s 6 feet away from me,” she said. Staff can advise seniors of stores that may have curbside pickup or contactless checkouts and, if needed, steer them to programs for monetary help such as Lunch Break or Meals on Wheels. Some seniors are frail or convalescing and unable to get out of their homes in nonpandemic times. “We’re here to assist all members,” Davis said. “It’s so important right now for families to be in touch – even if they’re out of state,” said Davis. “That’s where the breakdown can happen. We follow through to make sure everybody is talking.” Some residents have embraced the technology and for some the reactions have been endearing. “We get a lot of ‘Where are you? I can see you, but I can’t touch you.’ ”  Plant admits it’s a trying time and she’s had disappointments; her 85th birthday celebration was scheduled for the Molly Pitcher Inn. “We had to cancel,” she said. “But that’s neither here nor there.”  She misses attending the Zumba classes the building used to run and daily Mass at St. Leo the Great church across the street. “I don’t know when we’ll be able to go back,” she said.  Keeping seniors safe is on the minds of the Monmouth County Freeholders who have launched initiatives to help them, including expanding SCAT service, early morning transportation for seniors to take advantage of designated shopping hours offered by many grocery stores and other essential retail locations. “People are talking about dying,” Block said of seniors and the middle-aged. “I’ve had people who have said to me, ‘I’m not afraid to die, but I’m afraid to die alone.’ ”  And she has discovered she has a penchant for online shopping, although among the purchases are some she plans to return. “I have so much that has to go back to Talbot’s when this is all over.” Easter came and went with barely a celebration but Tamburro’s grandchildren and dog came to visit – social distance-style. “They came to the window with plants and homemade cookies,” said Tamburro, who lives on the first floor. They sang “Happy Easter” and left the gifts on the chair outside her window so she could retrieve them later. “We have had a strict no-visitation policy in effect since March 12th,” said Tom Kranz, director of communications, in an email.  But according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people 65 years and older are considered at high risk for severe illness from COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.  She urges everyone to ask themselves, “What can we all do to help our seniors?” Sometimes that means chatting with seniors about their concerns, especially about fears and isolation. “There is a loneliness factor, of course,” said Davis, “when you’re afraid to leave your house. But I’ve heard great things too, like it’s an opportunity to finally clean out that drawer, tackle projects.” Rose Tamburro has heeded the warning to stay home and out of supermarkets – even though she lives in a senior living apartment house adjacent to the Lincroft Acme. Instead, her daughter comes to drop off groceries.  “The health and safety of our residents and employees has always been and remains our number one priority,” said Kranz. She allows herself a walk to a small nearby store and recently brought a bagel back for a neighbor. “When she opened the door I threw her the bag – keeping 6 feet back – and she threw me a kiss,” Tamburro laughed. “It’s what we have to do.” Perhaps the most important role of the senior center is keeping the lines of communication open, especially between the senior and their family. Each member has supplied the center with an emergency contact to be called if their loved one is possibly at risk.  The article originally appeared in the April 30 – May 6, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. Some favorite pastimes include residents lining up in their doorways and playing Hall Bingo. “We yell the numbers down the hall,” said Rathgeber. “Or we go down the hall and let them sing karaoke. That’s a lot of fun. You know, you’ve got to get creative.” Barbara Plant celebrated her Easter this year 6 feet away from her loved ones. And even though social distancing can be inconvenient, she doesn’t feel lonely. By Judy O’Gorman Alvarez “Just put me with a book and I’ll be OK.”last_img read more

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Warburton’s complaints ‘pointless’ – Adkins

first_imgReading manager Nigel Adkins says Mark Warburton is wasting his time by complaining about referees..Warburton has been critical of officials in recent weeks, including after penalty decisions against Norwich and Watford and Tony Craig’s red card at Birmingham.The Brentford boss used his pre-match programme notes to bemoan the current post-match appeals process and outline his ideas for “clear improvements to be implemented”.Recent decisions have angered WarburtonBut Adkins, who has been a league manager for eight years, thinks Warburton is hypersensitive to these issues because it’s his first season in the Championship.Adkins said: “It was interesting reading Mark’s comments before the game.“He’s felt they haven’t been getting the decisions but we should have had three penalties the other night – so it’s across the board.“I think he’s noticing it more as a new manager in this league. Having been a manager for a few years now you realise that that’s what it is. There’s no point complaining about a referee.“It’s pointless talking about it, you have to concentrate on your own performance.”Reading were beaten 3-1 at Griffin Park, with Jonathan Douglas’ late header ending a second-half fightback from the Royals.Douglas climbed over a defender before heading home via the crossbar and Adkins suggested he may have fouled his marker in the build-up.“Every game there’s something to question. Was it a foul or not? The referee hasn’t given it and that’s football,” Adkins said.“You have to look at yourself and your team’s performance. If I’m going to analyse anything it’s the chances we missed.“We were on the front foot and should have put them away.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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