Interannual variation in the diets of two albatross species breeding at South Georgia: implications for breeding performance

first_imgThe diet and breeding performance of Grey-headed Albatrosses Thalassarche chrysostoma and Black-browed Albatrosses Diomedea melanophris breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia, were studied simultaneously during the chick-rearing period between 1996 and 2000. When samples for all years were combined, cephalopods and crustaceans were the main components in the diet of Grey-headed and Black-browed Albatrosses, respectively. However, their diets exhibited interannual variations. Cephalopods were the most important component in the diet of Grey-headed Albatrosses between 1996 and 1999 (60-75% by mass) but decreased significantly in 2000 (17%), when crustaceans dominated (61%). The Black-browed Albatross diet varied greatly, with cephalopods being the most important component in 1996 (49% by mass) and 1997 (48%), fish in 1998 (32%) and 1999 (40%), and crustaceans in 2000 (63%). In 1998 and 2000 there was a significant change in the cephalopod species present in the diet of both albatross species, when their breeding success was low. The consumption of the ommastrephid Martialia hyadesi was significantly and positively correlated with Grey-headed Albatross breeding success. For Black-browed Albatrosses significant correlations were found between its consumption of the Icefish Champsocephalus gunnari and breeding success, and between its consumption of M. hyadesi and M. hyadesi CPUE (Catch per Unit Effort). These findings suggest that Grey-headed Albatrosses are more reliant on Antarctic Polar Frontal Zone prey (M. hyadesi and Lamprey Geotria australis) whereas Black-browed Albatrosses are more dependent on Antarctic prey (Icefish and Antarctic Krill Euphausia superba). The differences between diets of Grey-headed and Black-browed Albatrosses breeding on different islands of the Southern Ocean showed that Grey-headed Albatrosses feed more on oceanic cephalopods (e.g. M. hyadesi) whereas Black-browed Albatrosses feed primarily on shelf fish (e.g. Blue Whiting Micromesistius australis), suggesting that albatross diets are likely to be influenced by the geographical position of those islands, albatross foraging preference and prey availability.last_img read more

Read More →

Prep Sports Roundup: 1/13

first_img Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailGirls BasketballRegion 14NEPHI, Utah-The Juab Wasps pounded Maeser Prep 63-23 Monday in Region 14 girls basketball action. Tags: Roundup January 13, 2020 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 1/13 Written bylast_img

Read More →

HAPPENINGS AT THE VANDERBURGH COUNTY GOP

first_imgPrint a copy of Invitation City Council Wards 1-3 Debate- Date: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 Farley Smith, Treasurer Straight Ticket Voting Reminder-Remember when marking your ballot that voting a straight Republican ticketdoes not select  Republican candidates for City Council At-Large.  You must make your individual selections from the list the candidates. Also remember that although you can vote for up to 3 candidates on the At-Large ballot, it is not required that you make 3 selections.  For more information visit scvasvasvasv Early Voting at the Vanderburgh County Election Office is currently underway 8:00 am – 4:00 pm weekdays now until Noon on Monday November 4, 2019.   Mark Your calendar                CLICK on event for more information  VCRP Breakfast – Saturday October 19, 2019 Kevin Harrison, Editor Vanderburgh County Republican Party BreakfastWHERE: C.K. Newsome Center , Room 118A-B100 Walnut Street, Evansville, IN 47713WHEN: Saturday, October 19, 20197:30 – Doors Open (Complimentary Continental Breakfast)8:00 – Program> Guest Speakers: City Council Candidates> Chairman Parke provides update on political happenings9:00- AdjournFor more information contact Mary Jo Kaiser:  812-425-8207 or email [email protected]  From the VCRP West Side Nut Club Fall Festival Booth …    Time: 12:00 PM October 28 (5:30 pm)EVSC Board of Trustees Meeting Time: 7:30AM- 9:00 AMLocation: C.K. Newsome Center , Room 118A-B100 Walnut Street, Evansville, IN 47713 For more information contact Mary Jo Kaiser at 812-425-8207 or email [email protected] October 26Saturday Early Voting Begins EVSC Board of School Trustees Meeting- October 21Early Voting at Libraries Begins or (812) 425-8207. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare November 4 (Noon)Absentee Voting at Election Office Ends                                                        Visit www.vanderburghgop.com Vote Republican ! Paid for by the Vanderburgh County Republican Party, Farley Smith, Treasurer   Make sure you add [email protected] to your address book so we’ll be sure to land in your inbox! Location: Room 301, Civic Center Complex                1 NW Martin Luther King Blvd, Evansville November 1Early Voting at Libraries Ends  For more information visit For more information visitRotary Club of Evansville   Date: October 28, 2019 October 28 (5:30 pm)City Council Meeting for more info. Thank you. City Council Wards 4-6 Debate- Date: Tuesday, October 22, 2019 Early Vote Locations:1) Election Office1 NW ML King Jr., Rm 2162) Cedar Hall School  2100 N. Fulton Ave3) Central Library200 SE MLK BLVD4) McCollough Library 5115 Washington Ave5) North Park Library960 Koehler Dr.6) Northeast Park Baptist 215 N. Boeke Rd7) Oaklyn Library3001 Oaklyn Dr.8) Red Bank Library120 S. Red Bank RdClick to locate Early Vote Site Thanks to everyone that helped make this year’s Fall Festival possibly the most successfulever for the Vanderburgh County Republican Party.   See you at Booth #49 next year. Location: Room 301, Civic Center Complex                1 NW Martin Luther King Blvd, Evansville October 19 (7:30 am)VCRP Monthly Breakfast  County Commission Meeting-   Date: Tuesday, October 22, 2019    Time: 12:00 PMcenter_img For more information visitRotary Club of Evansville   County Commissioners Location: Tropicana Conference Center421 NW Riverside DriveEvansville, IN 47708 Central Committee:Wayne Parke, ChairmanMary Jo Kaiser, Political DirectorDottie Thomas, Vice ChairmanLon Walters, Secretary  City Council Meeting-   Date: Monday, October 28, 2019 Support our Republican Candidates      Put out a Yard Sign      Donate Your Time      Make a Campaign Contribution    Location: Room 301, Civic Center Complex                1 NW Martin Luther King Blvd, Evansville  For more information visitCity Council    Time: 3:00 PM  Carter for City Council Fundraiser  County Council Meeting-   Date: Wednesday October 30, 2019 October 17 (5:30 pm)Archie Carter for City Council Fundraiser News and Upcoming Events for October 15, 2019              Time: 5:30 PM Stay in touch with GOP state legislators representing our area by clicking the links below. Stay in touch with GOP members of Congress representing our area at these links:United States Senator Mike BraunUnited States Senator Todd YoungCongressman Larry Bucshon, M.D. (Indiana 8th District) October 30 (8:30 am)County Council Meeting November 52019 Municipal Election Day Early voting at the Election Office is currently underway  weekdays 8:00 am – 4:00 pm weekdays now through Noon on Monday November 4, 2019.  To vote absentee by mail, complete the APPLICATION FOR ABSENTEE BALLOT found at the Vanderburgh County Clerk Elections web page and mail it to:Vanderburgh County ElectionP.O. Box 3343Evansville, IN 47732-3343Absentee ballot applications and forms can also be found on the Indiana Voters Portal . The deadline for absentee-by-mail applications to be received by the Election Office for the 2019 Municipal Election is 11:59 p.m., October 28, 2019. If you have any questions, please call the Election Office at 812-435-5122. The Vanderburgh County Election Office is located at :Civic Center Complex, Room 2161 NW ML King Jr. BLVD ,Evansville, IN    Time: 8:30 AM Early Voting at Libraries Begins next Monday, October 21, 2019Early Voting for the Municipal  Election will expand to Libraries beginning Monday October 21, 2019, with Saturday voting beginning 10/26/19.Early Vote Dates and Times are: * At the Election Office : Weekdays –. Tuesday October 8, 2019 – Friday November 1, 2019 -> Daily 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday November 4 – > 8:00 am to NOON Saturdays –. October 26, 2019   8:00 am – 4:00 pm. November 2, 2019 8:00 am – 4:00 pm * Early Voting at Satellites locations (2 weeks) Weekdays at Central, McCollough, Northpark, Oaklyn, and Red Bank Libraries:. October 21, 2019 – October 25, 2019. October 28, 2019 – November 1, 2019. Hours are Monday – Thursday noon to 6:00 pm , Friday noon-5:00 pm Saturday Voting at Northeast Park Baptist & Cedar Hall School:. October 26, 2019    8:00 am – 3:00 pm. November 2, 2019  8:00 am – 3:00 pm October 22 (3:00 pm)County Commission Meeting October 22 (12:00 pm)Rotary Club City Council Wards 4-6 Debate October 15 (12:00 pm)Rotary Club City Council Wards 1-3 Debate County Council  Location: Board Room, EVSC Administration Building                  951 Walnut St., Evansville    Time: 5:30 PM Location: Tropicana Conference Center421 NW Riverside DriveEvansville, IN 47708 Time: 11:30 AMLocation: GOP Headquarters815 John Street, Evansville Meetings are open to all Vanderburgh County Precinct Committeemen   VCRP Central Committee Meeting – Wednesday, October 23, 2019          If you have any questions, contact Mary Jo Kaiser, VCRP Political Director, at [email protected]  Visit the Vanderburgh GOP EVENTSpage for daily updates.    Learn more about the Candidates:     Visit Vanderburghgop.com November 2Saturday Early Voting Ends State Senator Jim Tomes, District 49 State Senator Vaneta Becker, District 50 State Representative Matt Hostettler, District 64State Representative Wendy McNamara, District 76State Representative Holli Sullivan, District 78   last_img read more

Read More →

ERA, LEONARD P. SR.

first_img72, affectionately known as “Skip”, passed away on March 28, 2018. He was born in Cambridge, Maryland, but lived most of his life in Bayonne. He served in the United States Navy from 1963-1966 before his employment as a Mason worker which he continued until his retirement. He is predeceased by his wife, Patricia (nee: Patrick). He is then survived by his two sons, Leonard A. Era Jr., and Joseph J. Era and his wife, Ginny (nee: Farley) Era. He is also survived by his granddaughter, Emma Patricia Era; his brothers, Richard and his wife Laura, Phillip and his wife Beverly, John, Paul and his wife Elaine; his sister Marie and her husband Jim Dorman, brother-in-law Joseph Patrick and his wife Veronica; and by his many nieces, nephews, and friends. Funeral arrangements by DZIKOWSKI, PIERCE & LEVIS Funeral Home, 24 E. 19th St.last_img read more

Read More →

Great British chip flavours

first_imgTyrrells has launched three new ’Great British Potato Chip’ flavours to coincide with British Food Fortnight. The new varieties are Welsh Rarebit, Beef Wellington and Pork & Apple and retail in newly designed packaging featuring bunting and an invitation to “join the celebration”.They are sold in 40g handybags and will be available for a 12-month period. The trade launch will be supported by a sampling campaign and free point-of-sale material for over 3,000 independents, to include a bespoke counter-top display unit, bunting and a poster.Tyrrells will also be launching a consumer campaign, which will offer a monthly ’British’ prize for example classic car weekends and tea party kits.RRP: £0.64p (40g)www.tyrrellspotatochips.co.uklast_img

Read More →

History in the baking

first_imgBaking a cake for thousands might daunt some. But for Joanne Chang ’91, it’s all in a day’s work. The chef-owner of Boston’s Flour Bakery + Cafe says she perfected her problem-solving skills and grace under pressure as an applied math and economics concentrator while living in Leverett House.Her talents will be on full display as Harvard commemorates its 375th birthday next week with a celebration that includes a giant cake baked by Chang and her team. She recently sat down with the Gazette to talk about cooking for masses, frosting, and how college has changed since her undergraduate days.How did this come about? I know Martin Breslin, the director of Harvard’s culinary operations. He was actually the judge in the “Throwdown with Bobby Flay” that I was in, so I met him back in 2007. We’ve kind of kept in touch since then, and then sometime last summer he emailed me about the 375th and said he’d like to talk to me about baking the cake.We don’t usually do crazy cakes, so I told him that. I said we can make cake forever, but we don’t do really architectural cakes; we’re not going to make a cake model of Harvard. He said that wasn’t what he was thinking about, so I said I’d be happy to consider.The initial idea was to do sheet cakes piled on top of each other in a big H. We were going to tier them one on top of the other and then frost the whole thing, so the cake would be like 6 feet high. Martin had a meeting with the Harvard planning people and came back and said that’s not what they want. So we brainstormed a little bit, and he came up with the idea that Harvard would build, basically, a platform in the shape of an H and we would top that platform with cake. So that’s what we eventually decided upon.They’re building an 18-foot by 15-foot platform, and we are making sheet cakes that are 26 by 18 inches, and probably 6 or 7 inches tall, and we’re laying them end to end to create an H.At that point, when we agreed on a design, and the number of cakes — it’s going to be 60 sheet cakes — we agreed that we’d do red velvet because Harvard is crimson, and at that point we said, “Yeah, we can do this.” I knew we could do it, and Martin was happy with the design.You run a busy business, and space is at a premium in your bakeries. Did you ever consider saying, “No, this is too much”?Well, I said to Martin that we can do it, but we can’t store the cakes; we physically don’t have the space. And you have to have a deep freeze because you can freeze cakes, but they won’t stay great unless you have a deep freeze — a freezer that quickly freezes and keeps them at a very low temperature so the quality of the cake isn’t affected. Martin said we don’t have a problem with picking up the cakes from you and storing them in our kitchen freezer.If he hadn’t been able to do that, we would have had to say, “I’m sorry, but we can’t do it.” We can make two sheet cakes at a time, and we pretty much have to get them out of there because we have deliveries and cake orders coming in every day.So, 60 sheet cakes. How many does that feed?It’s supposed to feed 4,000. It could feed as many as 5,000.Aside from the space and storage part, what are some of the challenges for baking a cake for this many people?Honestly, because of the way we’re doing it, baking two sheet cakes a day, there is no challenge. It’s what we do. We bake cakes. We decorate them. The challenge was where to store them, and that’s been solved by Harvard. Given that the cakes are being stored off-site, there was the question of who’s bringing them there, and again Harvard helped with that. The final challenge hasn’t happened yet — which is how do we actually get the cakes to the platform? How do we drive 60 cakes from the kitchen at Harvard to the Yard and unload all these cakes? And how are we going to finish them all off with frosting? I think we’re bringing five or six of my bakers that day at like 1 in the afternoon. We’re going to use a frosting that can sit out for an amount of time, and we’re trying to get there so that we have at least 4 hours to decorate the cake. Each of us can do a cake in 5 or 10 minutes, so we should have plenty of time.What kind of frosting?It’ll be a Swiss meringue butter cream. Vanilla. We’ll make it that day, and we’ll truck it over. I don’t even know in what containers.Did you already have a recipe, or was there some development involved?We already had a recipe, but we had to increase the batch size to make enough for two full sheet cakes. That took one test.Did you ever imagine during your undergraduate days at Harvard that one day you’d be baking a cake for a celebration like this?Oh, not at all. Never.You graduated in 1991. How has the University changed since you graduated?Everything has changed. We didn’t have cellphones. There was no such thing as Facebook. There was no such thing as texting. There was no such thing as computers. That’s the big thing. I brought a typewriter with me to college. I did all of my papers on a typewriter. Nowadays, if you want to know something, you just type it into Google. At the time you had to just not know; you didn’t know a lot of things.Are there any ways that your undergraduate experience helped prepare you for your career now?I mean, Harvard’s a high-pressure environment. Also, problem-solving skills, just in my major, applied math and economics. But there’s a lot of prestige that goes along with the Harvard name. I don’t know that I would have gotten my first cooking job without being differentiated as a Harvard grad. It definitely carries a lot of weight. In the cooking world, it’s not something that’s common. You stand out a bit.What is it like as an alum to be a part of the 375th celebration?It’s exciting. I think it’s definitely an honor that they contacted me and asked me to make this cake. There’s definitely a lot of pressure. You know, 4,000 people are going to be having a piece of this cake and judging it. That’s always a little bit daunting. But above all, it’s an honor. I don’t know that there’s another way I could have been a part of it. If I’d pursued another line of work, I probably wouldn’t be.Visit the website to learn more about Harvard’s 375th celebration.last_img read more

Read More →

Advising on climate change

first_imgWhen Daniel Schrag arrived at Harvard as a 30-year-old geologist interested in paleoclimate, the study of climate changes through history, he didn’t realize his career was about to gain another dimension.“My first day at Harvard, in August 1997, [Professor] John Holdren … walked down the hall and said, ‘Dan, President Clinton … has just asked me to brief each cabinet member individually before the cabinetwide discussion of what we should do about Kyoto [where an international agreement was reached to reduce greenhouse gases]. … What is new about climate science that you can tell me, that I could use to help educate the cabinet?” said Schrag, who now is the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology and director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. “For me, that was ‘Welcome to Harvard.’ ”When it comes to the closely linked issues surrounding climate change, energy, and the environment, Harvard faculty research regularly grabs headlines (such as January’s battery breakthrough by Sykes Professor of Materials and Energy Technologies Michael Aziz), as do efforts by the University itself to become more sustainable (such as the dozens of LEED-certified green buildings and the biomass-generating facility recently opened at the Harvard Forest). But for Schrag and many other faculty members, advising policymakers — through boards, testimony to Congress, and phone calls fielded in off-hours — is a significant, though unheralded, part of their jobs.The demands of these advisory roles can be sizable, requiring regular trips to Washington, D.C., travel to meetings overseas, and conference calls and video conferences, as well as the research, writing, and staff time required to prepare reports and official documents.Such advisory work can take other forms as well. For some, such as Archibald Cox Professor of Law and Director of Harvard Law School’s Environmental Law Program Jody Freeman, who worked in the White House for two years as counselor for energy and climate change, it means taking leave from Harvard to serve in an official capacity. For others, such as Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government Robert Stavins and Raymond Plank Professor of Global Energy Policy William Hogan, it means heading advisory programs at the University, such as Stavins’ Harvard Project on Climate Agreements and Hogan’s Harvard Electricity Policy Group.Similarly, William Clark, the Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy, and Human Development, co-directs Harvard Kennedy School’s (HKS) Sustainability Science Program, which supports policy-relevant studies and seeks to bridge the research and policy world on issues related to environmental sustainability. John and Natty McArthur University Professor Rebecca Henderson, meanwhile, provides a similar bridge to the business community through Harvard Business School’s (HBS) Initiative for Business and Environment, which she co-chairs.“Harvard’s faculty members bring an enormous range and depth of intellectual power to the fields of energy and the environment,” said Richard D. McCullough, vice provost for research and SEAS professor of materials science and engineering. “Their strong commitment to meeting the challenge of climate change is evident in the work that they do to inform the development of law and policy to advance sustainability and address climate change around the world.”Duty, commitment, beliefFaculty members who take on such work do so out of a sense of duty, a commitment to public service, and a belief that the scientific knowledge so painstakingly gained, while important in its own right, reaches its fullest flowering when put to work. The result is often more-informed policymakers, better laws, more effective regulations, and scientists better informed about how government works.“Why do I do it? The main reason is giving back and being part of the decision-making process at EPA [the Environmental Protection Agency],” said Francine Laden, the Mark and Catherine Winkler Associate Professor of Environmental Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), who sits on the EPA’s Science Advisory Board. “It is important that outside experts provide their expertise to advise the EPA administrator on priorities and provide insights and critiques of reports prepared by or used by the agency. Also I learn a lot.”In recent years, Harvard faculty members have shepherded the work of thousands of scientists on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), advised the Department of Energy on organizational structures that might foster energy innovation, examined the economics of environmental regulation, and counseled President Barack Obama on science and technology.John Holdren, the Harvard Kennedy School and Earth and Planetary Sciences professor who walked into Schrag’s office that day in 1997, today directs the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Among his duties is chairing the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), which includes Schrag and Broad Institute Director Eric Lander, professor of systems biology at Harvard Medical School, who is the council’s co-director.Holdren said that advice from academic experts from Harvard and other institutions, as well as that from experts in private industry, is indispensable to him, to senior administration officials, and to Obama himself.“I’d venture to say that a large proportion of the initiatives and policies that have been advanced by the Obama administration have been influenced in significant ways by ideas contributed by the wider intellectual community,” Holdren said.Schrag and other faculty members said watching the political gridlock in Washington and in other political bodies can be frustrating, but their efforts can prove gratifying when findings and recommendations result in action. Obama has sat down with PCAST to discuss some reports on various topics. From the give-and-take at those sessions, the advisers say, it’s apparent he’s not only read the reports, but takes their advice seriously. Some recommendations, Schrag said, have become policy, such as the Agriculture Department’s creation of regional hubs to help farmers and foresters deal with the impact of a shifting climate.“Part of the motivation”“To me, this is part of the motivation to do the science we do,” Schrag said. “Part of the joy of being at Harvard is connected to these sorts of activities.”Cherry Murray, dean of Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), sits on the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board and has participated in numerous National Academy of Sciences and American Academy of Arts and Sciences studies. Murray said that an important aspect of such advisory roles is that the information and recommendations are impartial and untainted by the political fray.“Advice provided in this way is really important in the political debate, as it is above politics,” Murray said. “I think it is the best way for academics to formally provide advice to the government, as government officials can then act officially on that advice.”Such faculty involvement occurs at all levels of government, from local to international. Schrag, together with John Spengler, the Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), and Joyce Rosenthal, assistant professor of urban planning at the Graduate School of Design (GSD), sits on an advisory panel on climate preparedness for the city of Cambridge that looks at how to mitigate future climate impact. While it is important that federal policy be informed by sound science, Schrag said, it’s also important that local officials get good advice, because it is at that level that bricks-and-mortar decisions are being made — seawalls raised and building systems elevated — through zoning rulings and building codes.One of the highest-profile bodies dealing with climate change is not federal, but international. The IPCC for decades has summarized the state of science surrounding the issue. Harvard faculty members have played a variety of roles with the body, from offering scientific updates as contributing authors, to taking leadership roles, as Alexander Agassiz Professor of Biological Oceanography James McCarthy did as a lead author of 1990’s First Assessment Report and as a co-chair of Working Group II for 2001’s Third Assessment Report, the first that said the effects of climate change were being seen on every continent.McCarthy said he had hoped that the early IPCC reports would spur more response on the issue, and he has continued to work to galvanize action in his roles with other organizations. He chairs the board of directors for the Union of Concerned Scientists and is a past president and chair of the board of directors for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He is still involved with the AAAS, helping lead an initiative called “What We Know” that puts climate science in plain English to address public confusion about the overwhelming scientific consensus on the issue.Informing the international dialogueAt HKS, Stavins runs the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, an international, multidisciplinary initiative that seeks to inform the international dialogue over a future global climate agreement. The project does that through research papers and policy reports on an array of subjects related to climate change. In addition, Stavins and project staff attend the international meetings, called Conferences of the Parties, where national delegates seek to iron out details of a new agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions. The project hosts educational sessions and private meetings with national delegations to discuss the latest research related to particular aspects of the climate negotiations.Stavins has served on other advisory bodies, including his time chairing the EPA’s environmental economics advisory board, which he said plays an important advisory role for the EPA. Stavins said his most influential encounters, however, may have come in informal conversations tightly focused on a decision-maker’s questions.Like McCarthy, Stavins also plays a lead role within the IPCC. Stavins, who has served as a lead author on previous assessment reports, is a coordinating lead author for a chapter on international cooperation in the Fifth Assessment Report, nearing release. The work is extensive, Stavins said, and he has wondered more than once whether it’s the best use of his time.“The IPCC has been a huge amount of work,” Stavins said. “But one thing one has to acknowledge is that in terms of international assessments, it does have tremendous credibility. … So even if there’s a small probability of affecting things, the consequences of that would be potentially very significant.”last_img read more

Read More →

GRC hosts annual ’A Time to Heal’ dinner

first_imgImagine something as ordinary as a pair of shoes transformed into a symbol of both solidarity and hardship. Selena Ponio | The Observer The Gender Relations Center hosted its annual ‘A Time to Heal’ dinner Wednesday night as part of its Violence Prevention Initiative. Students engaged in discussions regarding relationship violence.Senior Katherine McManus spoke as the keynote speaker at the Gender Relation Center’s annual “A Time to Heal” dinner Wednesday night and shared her story about Converse sneakers and her sister, Victoria, who died as a result of dating violence.According to the Gender Relation Center (GRC), “A Time to Heal” has been an annual event that is part of the GRC’s Violence Prevention Initiative (VPI). It was started with the thought that gathering for a meal provides a comfortable setting for an otherwise difficult topic, such as relationship violence.“I know these events can be heavy and two years ago … I would feel the same way: uncomfortable, tired, thinking I’ve heard it all before, but most of all, thinking this would never happen to me,” McManus said.McManus said prior to her sister’s death she thought of relationship violence as a topic for TV shows and movies. However, she became aware of the reality of it as she watched her parents make decisions for her sister’s funeral.“To dwell on my sadness or move on in honor of her life was the choice that was put before me,” McManus said. “My choice was love, not anger. But with this choice also came change.”Christine Gebhardt, director of the GRC, talked about the importance of this annual dinner and stories like McManus’.“This is an annual event that is a collaborative effort intended to acknowledge the effects of relationship violence … but more importantly to embrace the survivors in our community and to celebrate the community of healing that we share as a campus,” McManus said.Student body president Bryan Ricketts talked about the immense amount of support visible within the Notre Dame community that became especially evident during the sexual assault prayer services at the Grotto. He then stressed the importance of community involvement and how support, rather than blame, is necessary in cases of sexual violence.“Avoid your curiosity because you’re helping a person, not an event. They will tell you when they want to,” Ricketts said. “The size of your action is not important, the fact that you’re doing it is.”Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president of student affairs, gave the blessing for the meal and led a prayer for all those affected by the injustice of relationship violence.“In the breaking of bread together, we offer each other a sign of Your peace as we commit to a stance of intolerance for those violent acts of injustice towards human dignity that have no place in our community and this world,” Hoffmann Harding said.McManus ended her keynote speech on a hopeful note by commenting on the flood of support she received from her lacrosse teammates, family and friends.“There are not enough ‘thank you’s’ or words in this world to express my gratitude for the love and support that I received and have continued to receive even a year and a half later,” McManus said.McManus said that without her network of support from her friends and the Notre Dame community, she would have had a more difficult time moving forward. She said she made the decision to love the footsteps her sister had laid out for her instead of hating the man who took her life.“In my laughing, my breathing, my loving and crying, and living, she is with me,” McManus said. “I could go on and on. … My support network made the choice to help me put my life together and define my new normal.“It’s hard to fall apart when everyone you know wears Converse sneakers to a funeral because those were your sister’s favorite shoes.”Tags: A time to heal dinner, Gender Relations Center, GRC, relationship violence, Violence Prevention Initiative, VPIlast_img read more

Read More →

Vermont business leaders support early childhood investments

first_imgTough economic times require business and government leaders to rethink public policy and not only change the ways in which we deliver public services, but to build capacity for future success. According to Bill Stritzler, Managing Partner with Smugglers’ Notch Resort, and chair of the Vermont Business Roundtable, “Investments in education should be our first economic development strategy.”In recognition that education transformation must begin with a strong foundation of high quality early learning experiences, Lisa Ventriss, President of the Vermont Business Roundtable (Roundtable), announced today a new partnership, Pre-K Vermont, between a coalition of early education advocates and her organization. “If we are to meaningfully address the escalating costs of our correctional and social welfare programs, and improve educational outcomes, we need to improve our investments in younger children. Early education helps children enter school ready to learn and makes them ten times less likely to be retained in first grade. Controlling costs in public education, while avoiding the stigma that children take with them after being held back, is very important.”The Vermont Business Roundtable has long been recognized as a leader in public policy development for an array of issues from education to the environment. The organization’s efforts contributed to the passage of Act 62 in 2007, which allows towns to invest in early learning programs.The new partnership announced today will be funded through a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Partnership for America’s Economic Success and Pre-K Now. The Roundtable will become the new sponsor of Pre-K Vermont, an organization dedicated to increasing access and quality to high quality pre-k programs statewide, with members from business, advocacy, public education, and higher education.The partnership will develop public policy recommendations regarding early childhood investments and share these with public leaders.Act 62 Background:This year a pre-k enrollment cap will be removed for towns with schools deemed to be “underperforming”.Act 62 was signed into law on June 1, 2007. It received strong support from parents and educators, the Vermont Business Roundtable and other business leaders, law enforcement, leaders in education and medicine, along with community leaders across the state.Under the legislation, pre-k programs meeting specified quality standards will be allowed funding for 10 hours per week, if local school districts approve. Programs are capped to allow roughly half of the three and four year olds, or all of the four year olds in each district, but districts can also choose to fund all children.The bill was passed as a result of a legislative study performed by the Pre-K Study Committee, which included review of four decades of research and testimony from dozens of experts from inside and outside of Vermont.Both public and private providers will be qualified to receive funding, but no school district is required to offer pre-k programs. The pre-k program is also voluntary for families. Members of Pre-K Vermont include representatives from Vermont Business Roundtable, Kids are Priority One, University of Vermont, Vermont Superintendents Association, Head Start, Building Bright Futures, Vermont School Boards Association, private providers, and Northern Lights Career Development Center.The Roundtable is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization of 100 CEOs of Vermont’s top private and nonprofit employers, representing geographic diversity and all major sectors of the Vermont economy. The Roundtable is committed to sustaining a sound economy and preserving Vermont’s unique quality of life by studying and making recommendations on statewide public policy issue to benefit all Vermonters.Source: VBR. 5.14.2010# # #.last_img read more

Read More →

Nicaraguan army naval unit seizes cocaine shipment

first_imgBy Dialogo July 18, 2012 MANAGUA, Nicaragua — The Nicaraguan army seized 432.8 kilos (954.2 pounds) of cocaine on the country’s Northern Caribbean coast after a shootout with four drug dealers who escaped, authorities said. The drug traffickers were spotted by a vessel of Nicaragua’s Army Naval Force July 14 in Sandy Bay, a beach area located in the country’s Autonomous Region of the Northern Atlantic. “Boats from the Naval Force pursued [the narco-traffickers],” the army said. “[The narco-traffickers” then opened fire against soldiers, with no casualties registered.” The dealers escaped in a jungle area close to the beach, authorities added. After boarding the abandoned vessels, soldiers found the drugs inside 17 sacks, along with a shotgun, seven cell phones, five barrels of oil, 15 communication radios, waterproof boots and bodysuits, balaclavas and lifeguard vests. [Laprensa.com.ni (Nicaragua), 17/07/2012; Nicaraguahoy.info (Nicaragua), 18/07/2012]last_img read more

Read More →