Well, I declare

first_imgWhat is the best way of dealing with a job applicant’s health declarationform and who should be privy to the sensitive information it may contain?Q Last month we asked whatreaders would do when faced with the following problem: One of our departmentshas been upgrading its recruitment processes in recent years. It providesinformation about the risk profile for jobs, for example. But it also asksshort-listed candidates to complete a health declaration form prior tointerview. The reason I came to hear of this was that I fielded oneenquiry from an unsuccessful candidate about whether an item in the medicalhistory might have influenced the decision. The department is clear that therewere professional reasons for the decision but I have suggested to thedepartment that this practice could be regarded as against the spirit of the DDA.The response is that the department has worked hard on its procedures andbelieves they are fair and non-discriminatory. It seems to me that a health declaration should be limited tothe candidate who is offered the job. An alternative might be to ask theshort-listed candidates to complete the form and place it in a sealed envelope.When a job offer is made the sealed envelope for that candidate is sent to theOHS, the envelopes of any candidates on a reserve list being retained pending adecision, and the envelopes of unsuccessful candidates are shredded, ideally bythe OHS. Winning answer A The pre-employment health screening is an important and integralpart of the employee recruitment and selection service. The purpose of thisscreening is to ensure that applicants are assessed prior to and for employmentto ensure that they are fit for the position they are applying for and areplaced in appropriate work. A pre-employment health questionnaire or a health declaration form is animportant tool for the occupational health nurse and/or the occupational healthteam. This tool helps to assess the applicant’s fitness from the answers givenin the form in determining the physical and psychological suitability toperform the job applied for. The OHN, in determining the fitness of the applicant, must take intoconsideration that the final decision rests within the spirit of the legalaspects of employment: – Equal opportunities policy – Health and Safety at Work Act – The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations – Disability Discrimination Act – Working Time Regulations The OHN must operate within the guidelines and professional code of ethicsset out by the UKCC and the GMC and be consistent with the guidance publishedfrom time to time by the Department of Health and the HSE. The pre-employment health screening process must be strictly confidentialbetween the assessing occupational health nurse or medical practitioner and theapplicant. The sharing of health information must be limited to the health careprofessionals and the applicant. The appointing person is informed of theoutcome of health screening. Systems should be in place for safe storage of health records such as healthdeclaration forms and for employees to access health records as laid down inthe Access to Health Records Act and Regulations under the Data Protection Act.Therefore the best and most acceptable practice is following the interviewto ask the successful candidate to complete the health declaration form incomplete confidence and enclose it in a sealed envelope addressed to theoccupational health nurse. The sealed health declaration form must only be scrutinised by theoccupational health nurse and a decision is given to the appointing person inwriting in the strictest confidence. In a health declaration form resulting ina negative decision, the decision must only be to state that the named personis considered unfit for the position applied for. The appointing person shouldnot be given any reasons for the decision. In line with the DDA, if reasonable suitable adjustments could be made tothe job in order to accommodate the applicant’s disability then the OHN shouldmake such recommendations. The final decision to appoint a person rests with the appointing manager. I do not wish to subscribe to the idea of holding a reserve list ofcandidates and completed health declaration forms as individuals’ healthconditions may change in a space of time. It is imperative to assess theapplicant’s fitness at the time of employment. R Pathmanathan Occupational health and safety adviser, Quantum Care A When I worked for an NHS trust in the locality, it occurred to meduring screening that they were interviewing candidates and sending a number ofshort-listed individuals for screening, as part of the selection process. We explained that this wasn’t acceptable, and that it wasn’t cost-effective.We advised that they provisionally book a time on the day of interview for theselected candidate to be screened. If the chosen candidate wasn’t”medically” suitable, they then had time to ask the second choice toattend for screening without wasting too much time, prior to sending out theregrettal letters. This also saved time if the first choice declined the joboffer, which happened occasionally. In addition, we had to work quite hard to impress on them that it was notacceptable to inform the candidate that the job was theirs, as long as theypassed the medical. I haven’t had this experience with any other employer. Another “dilemma” I’ve encountered during pre-employment screeningis that of an individual who has applied for a post, been selected, attendedfor screening and then informed me she is pregnant. The job she applied for wasa crucial post, which had taken a lot of time and effort to fill. In thesecircumstances, I passed the individual fit for employment, as there was been nomedical reason not to do so. In this situation I would advise/persuade theindividual to inform the proposed manager of her pregnancy, but if she declinedto do this, I would be unable to breach the confidentiality issue. What wouldothers do in these circumstances? Ann Roberts Senior occupational health adviser/ business development manager, CorporateMedical Management A I read with interest your dilemma in this month’s magazine. As acompany we provide pre-employment assessments to certain companies via a paperscrutiny method from our remote HUB centres in Scotland and Manchester. When we enter into this type of contract with the clients we specificallyoutline the procedure that should be followed, this includes putting the healthdeclaration or pre-employment health assessment form in the job offer pack forsuccessful applicants. We include a printed stamped addressed envelope and theforms are sent directly to our department with no risk of breach ofconfidentiality from the client companies. This allows us to give a fair andimpartial response on the individual’s fitness for work and because we outlinethe confidential nature of the process on the form which they can be sure comesdirectly to us, we have found that the respondents are more open and honest.Acceptability for the job is then judged on the references and the “fit forwork” certificate produced by the OH staff. As an OH nurse in an inhouse department, surely this type of suggestioncould be made to management using stamped addressed envelopes to reduce costs.This would prevent having unnecessary paperwork from candidates who do not makeit through the recruitment process. This could be presented as an effort toraise the quality and cost-effectiveness of a pre-placement programme whileprotecting them from the ever-increasing threats of litigation, a fact thatnone of them can afford to ignore. Margaret Murray RGN RM BA SPOHN Regional occupational health manager (Scotland), Bupa Wellness Previous Article Next Article Well, I declareOn 1 Dec 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 10/14/19

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Monday’s sports events:MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLNATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFFSWashington 8, St. Louis 1NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PRESEASONMiami 120, Atlanta 87Charlotte 120, Memphis 99Dallas 107, Oklahoma City 70Sacramento 128, Utah 115Denver 107, Phoenix 102LA Lakers 104, Golden State 98NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEBoston 4, Anaheim 2NY Islanders 3, St. Louis 2 — OTFlorida 6, New Jersey 4Minnesota 2, Ottawa 0Buffalo 4, Dallas 0Colorado 6, Washington 3Chicago 3, Edmonton 1NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUEGreen Bay 23, Detroit 22Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. October 15, 2019 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 10/14/19center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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May 2

first_img“While some viewers might find the ad distasteful, we considered most would understand the ad was light-hearted”- the Advertising Standards Authority rejects complaints about “sexual abuse” in a TV ad for Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain bars, in which a doctor diagnoses a patient’s complaints of feeling hungry as “cakey pangs”, asks him to take off his trousers, then answers a question about whether he’s a real doctor with, “No, I’m a baker”, before slipping on an oven glove”I hope it doesn’t become violent. That’s my main concern”- While unrest grows in Egypt over the availability of bread, Allison Lahav, owner of Chili’s pizzeria – one of the few Jerusalem restaurants that serves bread during Passover – has risked upseting Orthodox Jews by continuing to sell pizza over the week-long Jewish holiday, following a favourable court rulinglast_img read more

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My Career

first_imgHow did you get into baking?I left school quite young and started work as a cash collector for Panificio Italiano in Wembley, which involved looking after accounts in the City and in and around the West End. It was quite challenging, visiting Italian restaurants, but it prepared me for the highly competitive business that the baking industry is. I soon started bringing in business from the hotels and sandwich shops I was visiting and, while at Panificio, I also worked with the owner to create a range of par-baked products for hotels in London we would give them a small convection oven so they could bake off the bread.How has your career developed?After moving from Panificio, Roland Kuznik, a chef I’d met in London, randomly asked me to go work for him, as he was opening up a bakery, and wanted me to be sales manager and help launch Kuznik’s, the bakery, by developing the wholesale business. During my time there, we developed a range of German breads and gained a contract with Waitrose, as well as receiving interest from Marks & Spencer. I eventually moved from there to pursue a career abroad and after meeting my husband, who’s a baker, I worked for his family-run bakery. When we returned to the UK, I started working for Heathrow Bakery, which specialises in supplying airlines and sandwich manufacturers, as business development manager. I had a couple of other sales jobs after that, trying to break into something new, but my passion for this industry drove me back to my bakery roots.How did you get your current role?I like artisan-style products and speciality breads and was keen to work with similar products in the future. I’m a great believer in ’it’s not what you know, it’s who you know’, and a chance meeting with the owner of Jungs of Beaconsfield convinced me to join them to increase the wholesale business. I was keen to join a smaller company and I was extremely impressed by their products.What is your average day like?I spend the first part of the day dealing with any complaints and checking everything is OK and then I make courtesy calls to see customers and keep in regular contact with them. For me the personal touch is vital. I have a reputation for having a unique style, but being in the industry for over 30 years has kept me grounded. You need passion to do well, but in this industry, no two days are the same and that is why I love it so much.last_img read more

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Immigration white paper sparks staff shortage fears

first_imgBusiness will face a shortage of low-skilled staff under immigration proposals announced today, industry groups have warned.A £30,000-a-year minimum salary threshold the Government plans to set for all migrant workers is far too high, trade chiefs said in response to today’s white paper on immigration.The paper proposes replacing the current system of admitting only highly-skilled workers from outside the EU, and workers of all skill levels from the EU, with a single route.Under the plans, workers would have to earn at least £30,000, although the paper says government will discuss with businesses and employers what salary threshold should be set.Also proposed, as a transitional measure, is allowing short-term workers to come for a maximum of 12 months, followed by a 12-month ‘cooling off’ period to prevent people working in the UK permanently.The bakery industry and associated trades rely heavily on low-skilled workers, and concerns have already been raised about the plans.“The £30,000 minimum income requirement for workers coming to the UK is far too high,” said British Sandwich Association (BSA) director Jim Winship. “It needs to be around £20,000 in London and between £15-18,000 outside London, depending on the location.”He added that only allowing low-skilled workers to come to the UK for a year is too little.“At the very least it should be two years to allow for training and for businesses to see a return on their investment.”The British Retail Consortium (BRC) voiced similar concerns, saying the proposals would see retailers face rising hiring costs for new workers, putting pressure on the price of goods and services for consumers. “Setting the main cut-off for hiring workers from outside the UK at £30,000 would leave retailers and their supply chains recruiting from a very small pool of domestic labour, the vast majority of whom are already in work,” said BRC chief executive Helen Dickinson, adding it should be reduced.“Further proposals for a temporary 12-month visa for those earning under £30,000 would embed unnecessary cost and churn into the recruitment process and undermine the work currently being done by retailers to attract and retain colleagues.”The government also plans to remove a cap on the number of skilled workers being admitted, which the BRC said was a positive.THe BSA said it welcomed a review of the UK immigration rules which it described as not working for the sandwich industry in the current Brexit climate.”Businesses in the food industry are already struggling to fill vacancies because of the uncertainties over Brexit and this will get worse unless the rules are relaxed. We know of restaurants that are unable to open due to staff shortage,” added Winship.last_img read more

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Iraq latest crucible for Harvard mediation

first_imgDispute resolution programs now offer master’s and even doctoral degrees at some campuses, among them the University of Massachusetts at Boston, MIT, Tufts, and Brandeis. The Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School is a renowned source of expertise in the field. Conflict management experts from the Boston area also helped tackle vexing international stalemates, from Northern Ireland to South Africa, Kosovo to China…Read more here (The Boston Globe)last_img

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Stop Building Stuff That’s Boring

first_imgIn an interview on theCube, Chad Sakac implores enterprise IT to “stop building the stuff that is boring… and doesn’t differentiate you one bit”, offers his predictions on the combination of Dell EMC and the future of Converged Infrastructure.last_img

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Student government candidates discuss parietals, student life at debate

first_imgWith the student government elections this week, the Notre Dame chapter of the Knights of Columbus hosted a student government election debate Sunday evening in the Carey Auditorium in Hesburgh Library. The candidates discussed the parietals policy, areas for improvement in student government, the role of Catholicism at Notre Dame, student life and sexual assault prevention. The candidates running for student body president and vice president respectively this year include junior Noble Patidar and freshman Connor Patrick, junior Connor Whittle and sophomore Jack Rotolo; junior Zachary Mercugliano and freshman Aviva Lund, freshmen Henry Bates and Thomas Henry, juniors Michael Dugan and Ricardo Pozas Garza and juniors Rachel Ingal and Sarah Galbenski.The Bates-Henry ticket was not present at this debate.  Max Lander | The Observer Pictured From left to right, senior Mark Spretnjak, junior Connor Whittle, junior Noble Patidar, sophomore Sam Delmer, junior Michael Dugan, junior Rachel Ingal, and junior Zachary Mercugliano all pose with Knights of Columbus flag after a student government debate on Sunday, Feb. 9.Each candidate was given approximately a minute to answer each of the five questions posed as well as a minute and a half for an opening and closing statements.Candidates were asked to share their stance on the Universities parietals policy, specifically in light of growing concern over the policy voiced by student protests in Stanford Hall and Sorin College fall semester.Lina Domenella | The Observer Generally, candidates called for education about parietals amnesty and the need to foster open, meaningful and civil dialogues regarding parietals.“Given that parietals are going to stay at the university, at least in the short term, parietals amnesty is something that should be very clearly known from the first week that kids get here,” Patidar said.Mercugliano said that while he and his campaign welcome discussion about subjects such as the parietals policy, he criticized the form the protests Stanford and Sorin took last semester.“In Stanford and Sorin it was done in such a way that was disruptive to the life of that dorm,” Mercugliano said. “We would prefer to see discussions like that pursued in a more civil manner.”Ingal said that the need for having dialogues about issues like parietals on campus was essential, and she highlighted the need for education on parietals amnesty, specifically during welcome weekend.Lina Domenella | The Observer “[Parietals amnesty] is something that we would like to have mandatorily implemented in welcome weekend so that people are aware that parietals amnesty exists,” Ingal said. “Especially during the ‘red-zone,’ a time at the first six weeks of the semester where first-year women are susceptible to being sexually assaulted.”Dugan also said that parietal amnesty was very important but raised the possibility of altering parietals slightly.“I think the question itself is what is parietals, what is its purpose and how should that interact with the Notre Dame community,” Dugan said. “I think there are actually a number of ways you can actually revise parietals within what the board is willing to do.”Whittle said that he agreed that key to the issue of parietals was better education about parietals amnesty but also said that civil dialogue was essential for assessing the root cause of issues with parietals as a policy.“Overall, these movements stem from a much broader issue on campus that needs to be handled and need a student government that‘s going to lead them in having civil discussions on this campus,” Whittle said.Lina Domenella | The Observer Candidates were also asked to share areas in which they thought student government could improve, as well as ways they planned to make such improvements happen.Overall, candidates highlighted transparency, communication and representation as some areas where student government could be better.Mercugliano said that greater transparency was needed around student government and student government funding. He also said that he planned to make himself available to leaders of small and newly formed clubs on campus in order to keep them informed. Lina Domenella | The Observer “I believe in releasing frequent reports, so that the student body can follow along if they wish with what‘s happening in student government,” Mercugliano said. Ingal said that it was important for student government to mediate and represent the student body to those in power and that a greater effort should be made to make student government present in places like student dorms.“I think the way that Sarah and I have envisioned it is acting as a liaison between the people and power, so we understand student government is presented a lot of resources and what we want to do is disseminate that and really empower students,” Ingal said. “The idea is not only making yourself available within your space but going out of your space to halls, not just being in the office.”Dugan said that the two main ways that student government could improve were by fostering better communication with the student body, citing the need for redundancy in roles like director of communications, and reducing the budget to provide greater club funding as a way to empower the student body.Lina Domenella | The Observer “Student government continues to prioritize its own initiatives and own funding at the expense of student clubs,” Dugan said. “The fact of the matter is this, more people are involved in clubs than experience the direct impact of student governments programming side.”Whittle said that he thought student government could do a better job working with rectors and hall leadership to ensure that all students feel integrated into and represented in the Notre Dame community in the first month or so students are on campus. Specifically, he mentioned working to promote greater diversity in hall resident assistants to accomplish this.“We need to make sure students feel like they are represented within hall leadership and feel like they are going to be integrated and an influential part of the overall Notre Dame community,” Whittle said.Lina Domenella | The Observer Patidar also focused on greater inclusivity and communication between hall residents and student government officials. He said he would promote a greater degree of communication between the two.“Connor and I plan to visit each dorm once a semester. It’d be a very rare occurrence but it would be enough where you could go to each hall, update them on policy initiatives and ask them for survey data, like what they think about x, y, or z,” Patidar said.Tags: Budget, parietals policy, student government debate, Student government electionslast_img read more

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Courts get 12% funding boost

first_img$192,650 for an Early Child Representation Program in Miami. June 1, 2000 Regular News $250,000 for sexually violent predator civil confinement cases. (The Jimmy Ryce Act, passed in 1998, allows civil confinement of convicted sex offenders after their prison terms end.) The budget also includes $193,062 in new money to pay retired judges to sit in the circuit courts and $18,950 for retired judges’ work on the Fourth DCA. “The legislature recognized that the court’s budget is pretty tight, and there is not a lot of room to shave dollars off of that and we are appreciative of that,” Palmer said. Revision 7 The legislature also appropriated five positions and $462,477 to the Office of the State Court Administrator to assist with the implementation of Revision 7, approved by voters in 1998 and which requires the state to provide the bulk of funding for the courts. “We see this next year as a threshold year in terms of development of policy and development of budget recommendations to begin substantial implementation of Revision 7,” Palmer said. “This basically gives us the tools to go in and do a better job of planning for the upcoming session.” Palmer said the legislature also appropriated $5.7 million for an Art. V Conflict Counsel Demonstration Project and $2.5 million for Art. V Contingency/Small County Extraordinary Case Expenditures. He said those programs are also part of the implementation of Revision 7. “One of the issues the counties argued was a problem in articulating a need for that constitutional revision was that a lot of the small counties could not afford to pay some of the exceptional costs that are associated with certain cases conducted in rural counties with limited tax bases,” Palmer said. The contingency fund will cover those extraordinary costs which would occur if, for instance, a small county was forced to conduct a Ted Bundy-type trial, he added. The court this year also asked the legislature to join with the judiciary in undertaking a comprehensive study of the juvenile delinquency system, similar to a recent effort undertaken in the area of juvenile dependency. The legislature responded with $125,000 for delinquency court improvements, which will be added to other resources already dedicated to the area of juvenile justice. “In the appropriation for staff in the Delphi project implementation, some of those resources will be devoted to looking at judicial workload in the juvenile division of the courts,” Palmer said. “We are also just in the pre-planning phases of how we will go about that study.” Other new spending in the court system’s budget includes: $212,675 for maintenance at the Supreme Court. $133,245 to paint the exterior of the First DCA. $753,500 for foster care review. Courts get 12% funding boost $352,992 for DCA maintenance and upkeep. Of that, the First DCA will get $185,637, the Second DCA gets $42,955, the Fourth DCA, $98,000, and the Fifth DCA, $69,720. $500,000 for model family court pilot projects. Courts get 12% funding boost Mark D. Killian Associate Editor The Florida Legislature has given the state court system an approximately 12-percent increase in its overall budget, including healthy pay raises for judges and 116 new positions, but no new judgeships. The new budget — which includes $36.5 million in new spending — also provides substantial funding to address the system’s workload issues and upgrades to court facilities, particularly at the district courts of appeal. “Overall, the court’s budget was increased by approximately 12 percent,” Chief Justice Major Harding said. “The legislature funded many workload and pay issues that needed attention. In addition, the judges received a pay increase.” What was not funded, however, was the 43 new circuit and county court judges certified by the Supreme Court as needed this year to deal with rising caseloads. “We understand from the House floor debate that education, health and human services and tax relief were the legislature’s priorities,” Chief Justice Harding said, noting, however, the lack of any new judges “will in all probability slow down the processing of cases through the system.” The judicial pay raises were part of a last-minute budget compromise between Senate President Toni Jennings, R-Orlando, and House Speaker John Thrasher, R-Orange Park, made public three days before the end of the regular session. Supreme Court justices will receive a raise of 3.4 percent to bring their annual salaries from $145,083 to $150,000. DCA judges will see their pay go from $130,576 to $138,500, or 6.1 percent. At the trial courts, circuit judges will see their pay rise from $117,010 to $130,000, or an 11.1-percent hike. County court judges will go from $104,018 to $117,000, or 12.5 percent. State Courts Administrator Ken Palmer said the $289.6 million and 2,890 positions appropriated for the courts will meet the system’s core needs. The court had asked for 3,325 positions and $307.4 million. “We’re certainly extremely gratified for their addressing a number of issues, including compensation, not only just for judges, but also marshall assistants, staff attorneys and some other court staff who received substantial raises,” Palmer said. Palmer, however, said he is disappointed lawmakers did not see fit to increase the number of judges, especially since the court had “worked very, very hard on a new methodology for weighing court workload.” Following a request by the legislature, Palmer’s office applied, in part, a new Rand Corporation developed “Delphi-based” caseload weighing system to assess judicial workload to help determine the number of new judges needed. “It took us a little over a year to undertake the study, and we had the involvement of [the Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability], and they ultimately endorsed the results of the study,” Palmer said. “But obviously the legislature did not have the money to do everything we wanted, and certification was not one of the things that wound up being funded.” The budget, however, includes $233,681 and three positions for the operation of the Delphi-based caseload weighing system. New Positions While there will be no new judges this year, the court system did pick up 116 new positions. Forty of the new employees will work to ease trial court workload issues. “Basically, those positions will be allocated on some type of formula to the trial courts just to fill in the gaps in terms of priority needs that [the circuits] have for staffing,” Palmer said. “It could include case management personnel, administrative personal in the finance and accounting area, deputy court administrators, those types of positions.” Of those 40 new employees, the Third, Sixth, 10th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th circuits will get new court technology officers. The other circuits were provided with chief technology officers in prior years. Seven more new employees will be assigned to the Fourth Circuit, and where the remaining 24 new workload employees will go has yet to be determined. Another 27 new hires will go to work in the state’s drug courts — which was a priority of the Governor’s and will provide for the operation of drug courts now in all 20 judicial circuits — and 20 will be assigned to family case management operations. The legislature also provided $132,502 and two positions to study the workload of the Supreme Court, and $241,128 and four new positions for appellate court workload issues. Capital Outlay The legislature also appropriated funds for a number of fixed capital outlay projects, including $11.6 million to continue work on the planned First DCA annex building in Jacksonville and $2.6 million for completion of the Fifth DCA building. Other capital improvements called for in the budget include: $88,270 for court interpreter services. $1 million for the Second DCA, which Palmer said needs to find a new home for its Tampa branch office because the 13th Judicial Circuit is set to reclaim space it now rents to the Second DCA when the current lease expires. “So we are planning ahead to make sure they have adequate facilities for that branch,” Palmer said. $1.45 million for small county courthouse facilities. $465,000 for an elder justice center in Plant City. $1 million for model dependency court pilot projects in the Fifth, 10th and 17th circuits. last_img read more

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DIGGING DEEPER: What are PFAS?

first_imgThe New York Department of Health has reports out showing that human exposure to PFAS can have several chronic, developmental and reproductive effects. 12 News is digging deeper to help you understand what the chemicals are, as SungEel plans to submit new permit information to the DEC addressing PFAS. According to the DEC, their purpose is to make a coating that can help products resist heat, oil and water. ENDICOTT (WBNG) — After the Department of Environmental Conservation raised concern about the possibility of a chemical group called PFAS being present in batteries recycled at SungEel’s proposed recycling facility, you may have wondered what exactly PFAS are. The NYDEC said in a statement to 12 News: “DEC takes seriously any potential threats to public health and the environment and conducts rigorous, science-based reviews of permit applications to ensure all permits meet New York State’s stringent requirements to protect our communities. DEC took immediate action to ensure that the facility operations involving PFAS would receive a comprehensive review, including requiring SungEel to apply for a permit modification if any PFAS-containing batteries were processed at Endicott. SungEel has provided some preliminary information regarding PFAS emissions to DEC, but has not submitted a complete response to DEC’s May 2020 letter, including the necessary  permit application. Any proposed permit modifications would include a SEQR review, with the type of environmental impact review determined after application materials and SEQR forms are submitted to DEC. DEC remains committed to continuing to keep residents and local officials informed throughout this process and using the best available science to ensure the utmost protection of residents.” The chemicals are also known to be in some lithium ion batteries, which is why the DEC is asking sungeel to provide some additional information about its process. The DEC says their toxicity and persistence in the environment make PFAS “A potential danger to public health and the environment.” Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, commonly known as PFAS, stands for a group of chemicals used on many different types of things you probably use everyday, like nonstick pans and furniture.last_img read more

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