Position Descriptions of Christmas Past

first_img Are the multi-skilled, or the specialists among us, more future-proof & better equipped for organisational evolution?I believe there are two trains of thought on this. These days with organisations advocating agile or iterative processes, we have witnessed a shift in not just how we meet deadlines and time restraints but in our professional mentalities. Everything is quicker, processes more streamlined and we are always looking for ways to create new efficiencies as we all deal with ever changing goalposts on a day to day basis. With this we of course become more than just what our defined position descriptions would have meant 5 to 10 years ago and instead we must be broader skilled, dynamic, out-of-the-box problem solvers who have to turn our hands daily to tasks which historically wouldn’t have been ours.On the other hand, we have a growing trend of positions being broken up into several roles where in the past they may all have been taken care of by one position. An example of this could be the role of an internal recruiter. In years gone by, a recruiter would be responsible for the end to end process of finding candidates for any given role – engaging them, appropriately screening them, interviewing them, coordinating interviews with relevant hiring managers – and thereafter would also be responsible for “closing” or hiring. However these days, a large number of recruitment roles are broken up more distinctly into sourcing, recruiting and account managing.There is merit in both methods but I will be interested to see moving forward whether it is the specialist or the broader-skilled that demonstrates more staying power. Position Descriptions of Christmas PastShared from missc on 19 Dec 2014 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed.center_img Related posts:No related photos. Read full article last_img read more

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Harding scores 36 to lift Weber St. past Utah Valley 72-67

first_img Tags: Jerrick Harding/UVU Wolverines Basketball/Weber State Wildcats Basketball December 4, 2019 /Sports News – Local Harding scores 36 to lift Weber St. past Utah Valley 72-67 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOREM, Utah (AP) — Jerrick Harding had 36 points as Weber State edged past Utah Valley 72-67 on Wednesday night.Harding hit 8 of 10 free throws, including a pair with :10 left to put the game out of reach.Tim Fuller had 10 points and three blocks for Weber State (2-5). Kham Davis added six rebounds.Cody John, who was second on the Wildcats in scoring entering the matchup with 13 points per game, shot only 20 percent for the game (1 of 5).TJ Washington had 18 points and six assists for the Wolverines (4-6). Trey Woodbury added 14 points. Casdon Jardine had 10 points.Weber State faces Westcliff at home on Saturday. Utah Valley takes on Southern Utah on the road on Saturday. Written by Associated Presslast_img read more

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Historic bakery closes

first_imgJohn Smith & Sons in Aberdeenshire has failed to win £1m in funding from the Big Lottery, and is having to close as a result.According to The Press & Journal, over 25 workers at the New Pitsligo bakery have lost their jobs. The company, founded in 1903, had an ambitious £1.4m expansion plan, but the Big Lottery rejected its proposals.The business was rescued from closure by community-based Fraserburgh Development Trust when it took it over in 2014, after owner John Smith decided to retire.The effort saved 25 jobs and was welcomed by former first minister Alex Salmond, then MSP for Aberdeenshire East, who described the business as “vital to the local economy”.The trust has now said it decided to shut down the 110-year-old operation immediately, due to environmental health concerns over the site, as well as rising repair costs.Fraserburgh Development Trust chairman, Ian Watson (pictured), said: “A great deal hinged on the Big Lottery decision, mainly the funding towards the project and the new build, which will sadly not go ahead now… Everyone is very disappointed at the outcome.”last_img read more

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Faculty recognized for teaching and mentoring

first_imgBrandon Terry and Jie Li received the 2020 Roslyn Abramson Award for excellence in teaching undergraduates. The annual award is given to assistant or associate professors and was formally announced at a May 5 faculty meeting.Terry is an assistant professor of African and African American studies and of social studies. In the spring, he taught the Gen Ed course “Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Question of Conscientious Citizenship” and the introductory course for social studies concentrators. Terry’s current research focuses on philosophical foundations of the historiographical debates surrounding the African-American civil rights movement.Li, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities in the department of East Asian languages and civilizations, recently taught “Documenting China on Film” and the Gen Ed course “East Asian Cinema,” as well as two graduate seminars on media culture and representation of cities in China. Her book, “Utopian Ruins: A Memorial Museum of the Mao Era,” will be published in December by Duke University Press.Recipients of the $10,000 prize are chosen each year based on their accessibility, dedication to teaching and research, and ability to effectively communicate with and inspire undergraduates. The prize was established with a gift from Edward Abramson ’57 in honor of his mother.At the faculty meeting, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Student Council awarded the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award to Kathleen Coleman. Coleman is James Loeb Professor of the Classics and senior research curator at the Harvard Art Museums. The Everett Mendelsohn award is awarded based on student nominations and is given to faculty for excellence in mentoring graduate students.last_img read more

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Food Network’s Neelys broadcast Vermont stories Tuesday

first_imgFood Network’s Neelys broadcast Vermont stories TuesdayFood Network’s favorite new husband and wife team – Pat and Gina Neely of the hit show Down Home With the Neelys – take to the road on a cross-country search for the best local, hand-crafted foods on their new primetime Road Tasted with the Neelys, which premiered Tuesday, July 22nd. Next stop? VERMONT! Pat and Gina are an awesome couple who have been instantly embraced by Food Network’s audience, and this episode highlights some great places they visited while in your backyard.Road Tasted with the Neelys follows the fun-loving couple as they highlight specialty stores and family-run businesses that make one-of-a-kind edibles. With the knowledge of what it takes to launch a successful family business and a passion for all things food, they’ll also show viewers how to get these fabulous food finds delivered right to their doors. I have attached their bio, which gives a better idea of what they are all about.The September 9th episode spotlights VERMONT where the Neelys visit fabulous local businesses. This episode will repeat on the following days/times: Sept. 19th at 10pmET/PT and Sept. 21st at 2:30pm.Premiering September 9th at 9:30pm ET/PTGrazing in VermontIn Vermont, Pat and Gina discover Vermont Butter & Cheese Company’s award-winning goat cheese and cultured butter. The Neelys sample maple macaroons the French way – without coconut – at Gesine’s Confectionery Road Crew Crunch, a satisfying snack made with chocolate and cereals, at Rex’s Outrageous. Finally, Pat and Gina enjoy Vermont Smoke & Cure’s all-natural, fine smoked ham.last_img read more

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National PTSD Center opens at VA in White River Jct

first_imgThe new headquarters building of the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder was officially opened today on the campus of the VA Medical Center at White River Junction. Vermont Senators Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders took part in a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the facility, which they say acknowledges the extent of PTSD and the the federal government’s commitment to helping veterans.The senators noted that the new Headquarters Building is the hub of what has become an extensive VA-wide PTSD research and education network — parallel to the direct care that veterans receive in VA medical facilities — which acts on the nation’s long-term commitment to look after those who have served once they return home.“I can’t say enough about the work done by the men and women of the National Center for PTSD,” said Leahy, who, as a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has championed investments in the Center to address PTSD cases among troops returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.  “We used to think of PTSD as something faced only by Vietnam veterans.  So many of our troops coming home today also suffer from PTSD.  It is more important than ever for us to look after those who have done and given so much for their fellow citizens and who now suffer from the invisible wounds of war.”Sanders, a member of the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, said, “At a time when studies tell us that over 300,000 or nearly one out of every five service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan report symptoms of PTSD or major depression, expanding and improving the nation’s leader in PTSD research is the least we can do. We must do everything we can to make sure our brave men and women in uniform receive the care they need when they return from war.”During their remarks at the Center, Leahy and Sanders renewed their commitment to supporting the Center in both the VA authorization and appropriations processes.Sanders worked closely with the chairman of the veterans committee, Sen. Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii), to bolster the budget for the White River Junction facility.  On January 24, 2008, they sent a letter to then-VA Sec. James Peake regarding the Center’s increased workload and relatively flat budget in recent years.  Sanders also met with the VA secretary personally to raise the issue again, along with other health care-related concerns. Over several years Leahy has requested and received millions of dollars in budget increases for the National Center at White River Junction.  In two of the past four years he secured language encouraging the VA to lift the Center’s budget to match its broad responsibilities.  At Leahy’s prompting the VA in 2009 was encouraged to increase the Center’s budget by $2 million.  Leahy is pressing in this year’s VA appropriations bill to further sharpen VA’s focus on the needs of PTSD-stricken combat veterans.Leahy said, “It has always been a source of purpose and pride to participate in the work of this Center.  Senator Sanders and I will continue to work with others in the Senate to make sure the Center is the priority, within VA, and within Congress, that it needs to be.”The VA established the National Center for PTSD in response to a 1984 congressional mandate (PL98-528) to address the needs of veterans with military-related PTSD.  The National Center’s mission is to enhance medical research and education on PTSD.  Convinced that no single VA site could adequately serve this unique mission, VA established the Center as a consortium of five divisions.  The Center currently consists of seven VA academic centers of excellence across the United States, with headquarters in White River Junction.  Other divisions are located in Boston, Mass.; West Haven, Conn.; Palo Alto, Calif.; and Honolulu, Hawaii. Source: Leahy and Sanders. 10.12.2010# # # # #last_img read more

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Going Home Again

first_imgA steep mountain road Brings a Runner Back to His Roots“You OK, son?”It’s mid-October of 2003—one of those crystal-clear fall afternoons that never seems to end—and an older man in a sedan has pulled up beside me on Georgia Highway 180 Spur. The two-lane blacktop snakes its way up Brasstown Bald, the highest point in the state, and I’ve decided to try running the three miles from its base at Jack’s Gap all the way to the thimble-shaped observation tower at the summit.“Oh, yeah. I’m fine. I just—” I wheeze as he interrupts me, asking if I need a ride. I’m hardly a mile up the highway, and he’s worried. Things aren’t going well.That run up Brasstown 15 years ago was the first of many I’d take while I attended college just a few miles down the road. In fact, those trips became a near-weekly occurrence: aim the car north, find a rock station broadcasting out of Atlanta, and wind my way on mostly empty state highways into the cluster of high mountains the next county over.And then there was the run itself. The climb up Brasstown is a beast, ascending at grades approaching 20 percent—a road steep enough to give pro cyclists fits during the Tour de Georgia in the early 2000s. Running to the summit just felt like you’d accomplished something badass, even in the age before a selfie was needed to make an outdoor trip complete.Looking back, I’m not sure why my runs up Brasstown became a thing. Maybe it was an escape from studying, or maybe it was a chance to get my mind off of stumbling my way into adulthood. Maybe it wasn’t even the running at all but the chance to get out alone in the mountains for awhile. One of my friends says that you never feel more alive than when you’re driving a little too fast down a southern backroad with the windows down and the radio blaring. He’s not wrong.Even though I and everything else around it had changed, the mountain—and the struggle of climbing it—was the same. And when it comes to why we get outdoors in the first place, isn’t that the point?Regardless of the reason, that feeling didn’t last. I eventually started a career and moved from visiting the mountains once a week to living in them, albeit a few hours north in Virginia. And over time, driving into the mountains quit being so special. It’s a feeling that all of us who live in the Blue Ridge risk. Our favorite parks and trails can become all too familiar, and the hills that once seemed so striking on our horizon can become just another part of the landscape. Today, I’ll often catch myself grumbling through traffic on my way to the trailhead after work to squeeze in an evening run.I never really thought about that change until this past winter, when a work trip put me back in Georgia and not too far from Brasstown. I ended up with a free afternoon, so I pointed the car north again and headed for the mountains just like I’d done years earlier. I wasn’t sure how it would turn out. The world seems angrier now, my understanding of it a bit wearier, and my body an undisclosed amount of weight heavier than when I made that first run up the mountain as a teenager. As I drove into the hills, I fumbled around for that old rock station but ended up finding someone shouting over political talk radio instead.I wish I could report that my return to Brasstown went well, but it didn’t. I started out from Jack’s Gap too fast, forgot my pacing, and blew up midway through a particularly steep grunt where the road angles right up the nose of the ridge. I walked, cussed, and trotted at intervals from there.At the top, though, I remembered why I made those runs so many years ago. In 15 years’ time, not much was different on the summit. The Brasstown Wilderness still cloaked the ridges surrounding the lookout, while the Blue Ridge gradually faded to the Piedmont to my south. Lake Chatuge glittered in the valley below. Even though I and everything else around it had changed, the mountain—and the struggle of climbing it—was the same. And when it comes to why we get outdoors in the first place, isn’t that the point?Maybe I’m just turning this essay into a therapy session, but maybe that’s also one of the many things the mountains can be. A few weeks after my trip to Georgia, I was sitting through an especially dull workday when that run up Brasstown came to mind. I snuck out of the office early, but this time I headed for the highest summit in the county instead of the park where I do my usual evening run. I left the car in a pull-out at the base of the mountain and began climbing an approach road that led to a lookout tower a couple of thousand feet higher up. It wasn’t Brasstown, but it was close enough.This run didn’t go any better, but as I eased around a sharp curve, an engine revved behind me. A pickup crept up the road, and a concerned voice called out from the driver’s seat.“You alright?”For a moment, it didn’t matter what mountain I was on. Everything clicked into place, and a goofy smile flashed across my face. “Oh, yeah,” I yelled back. “Everything’s fine.”last_img read more

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Crichel Down: the lowdown

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Arsenal make contact to sign £25m-rated Kerem Demirbay in summer transfer

first_img(Picture: Getty)The 25-year-old has helped Hoffenheim rise to sixth in the Bundesliga table this season and could be a cheap option as a replacement for Aaron Ramsey.AdvertisementAdvertisementArsenal lose Ramsey to Juventus at the end of the season and Emery is determined to find a suitable playmaker to take over from the influential Welshman.Emery pushed Ramsey out the door at the Emirates after telling Arsenal to withdraw their offer to extend his contract last year. Comment Advertisement Coral BarryThursday 18 Apr 2019 5:07 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link370Shares Hoffenheim want £22m for the midfielder (Picture: Getty)But the challenge of replacing Ramsey will be made even greater by the financial restrictions set to be placed on Emery.Even if the Spaniard does deliver Champions League football, Emery will have just £75m to spend this summer.MORE: Arsenal to hand Unai Emery £75m transfer budget if Champions League football securedMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man Citycenter_img Demirbay is a star at Hoffenheim (Picture: Getty)Arsenal are chasing the signing of Kerem Demirbay this summer, according to reports in Germany.The Hoffenheim No.10 is available for £22million due to a release clause in his contract and is attracting the gaze of several Turkish clubs.Demirbay has scored four goals and provided eight assists this season and it appears Unai Emery is ready to move for the midfielder.Bild claim Arsenal have already made contact with Hoffenheim about a potential deal and are happy to meet Demirbay’s release clause.ADVERTISEMENT Arsenal make contact to sign £25m-rated Kerem Demirbay in summer transfer Advertisementlast_img read more

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My food & drink job: Jack Rogers, Mondelez

first_imgJack hard at work perfecting chocolate at Mondelez’s R&D centre in BournvilleName: Jack RogersAge: 22Job title: TechnicianCompany: Mondelez UK R&D, BirminghamEducation: Level 2 professional bakery course at University College Birmingham Explain your job to us in a sentence (or two)I’m a chocolate technician at Mondelez International’s Cadbury Factory in Bournville, just outside Birmingham. I work in research and development, producing chocolate samples on our refiner lines. My job is to perfect existing products and help design the products of the future.Why did you decide to go for a career in food?I’m passionate about food and drink and knew it was a thriving industry that I wanted to be a part of. The sector has limitless learning opportunities providing a broad platform for me to build upon and grow my career.Tell us about how you went about applying for your job. What was the process?What really decided my future was attending a Mondelez International workshop whilst I was studying at UCB. The workshop advertised a new program called ‘The Technical Academy Placement’. Two successful candidates from the workshop would go onto a two-year apprenticeship at Mondelez. I made sure I applied as I knew it was a massive opportunity I couldn’t afford to miss – and here I am today! Jack and colleagues show Defra minister George Eustice how to make chocolate at Birmingham’s Big Bang FairWhat’s the best part about working for a food company?There are lots of perks, including sampling chocolate and new products before they hit shelves. My role means I take a lot of pride in seeing new products I’ve tested and worked on being enjoyed by friends and family. Mondelez is a brilliant company to work for they expose you to so many fantastic opportunities. In my time here I’ve been fortunate to have been able to teach MPs at the Houses of Parliament how we make chocolate and hosted chocolate demonstrations at the Big Bang Fair in Birmingham.And what’s the biggest misconception people have about working in food & drink?People don’t appreciate the science and technology involved in making foodPeople think I work in hospitality. They don’t appreciate the science and technology involved in making food. They think it’s all burger and chips!What advice would you give to other young people looking to get into the food & drink industry?Consider an apprenticeship. Look beyond traditional career paths. Many companies, including Mondelez, have graduate schemes and apprenticeships in manufacturing, R&D and even finance. Ask questions. Be curious, motivated and enthusiastic about the industry, and be prepared to learn and discover every working day.What’s your ultimate career dream?I’m really proud to have achieved my goal of gaining a permanent job within Mondelez following my apprenticeship. Now I want to develop within R&D. I’m passionate about building my knowledge, skills and network within this exciting industry and am fortunate that Mondelez’ Global Chocolate Centre of Excellence is based at our site in Bournville, meaning there are lots of exciting opportunities open to me in the future.Interested in finding out more about food & drink careers? Check out The Grocer Jobs for the latest vacancieslast_img read more

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