Daily limit increased to 8 trout at Mammoth Creek prior to rotenone treatment

first_img Tags: DWR/Fishing/Mammoth Creek FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY — The daily limit increased to eight trout on a portion of Mammoth Creek on Monday, which will allow anglers to catch and keep more fish before the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources treats the river with rotenone to remove its remaining fish.DWR Director Mike Fowlks issued the emergency change to the 2020 Utah Fishing Guidebook to give anglers the opportunity to catch and keep more fish in Mammoth Creek and its tributaries that are upstream of Forest Road 50 (excluding Castle Creek) before the river is treated with rotenone. Rotenone is a natural substance that comes from the roots of a tropical plant in the bean family. It’s lethal to fish but isn’t dangerous to people, pets or other wildlife, especially in the extremely low quantities that biologists use to treat the streams.“The upper Mammoth Creek drainage will be treated in early August to remove nonnative trout, such as brook, brown and rainbow trout,” DWR Aquatics Biologist Michael Hadley said. “It will also be treated again in August 2021. This project is part of an effort to restore native Bonneville cutthroat trout to their natural habitat in the drainage upstream of Mammoth Spring.”Castle Creek, a tributary of Mammoth Creek, was previously treated with rotenone in 2015 and 2016 and will not be re-treated in 2020. Bonneville cutthroat trout have already been stocked in Castle Creek, so the daily limit for Castle Creek will remain unchanged at four trout.The area will be restocked with Bonneville cutthroat trout in the fall of 2021 after the treatments have removed all the fish.The increased fish limit at Mammoth Creek became effective May 11 and will remain in place until Dec. 31. All other rules established in the 2020 Utah Fishing Guidebook remain in effect. May 12, 2020 /Sports News – Local Daily limit increased to 8 trout at Mammoth Creek prior to rotenone treatment Written by Robert Lovelllast_img read more

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Columbus Energy Resources reports CO₂ injection in Trinity Inniss field

first_img Columbus Energy Resources reports CO₂ injection in Trinity Inniss field. (Credit: drpepperscott230 from Pixabay) Columbus, the oil and gas producer and explorer focused on onshore Trinidad and Suriname, is pleased to announce the first injection of CO₂ in the Trinity Inniss field.Leo Koot, Executive Chairman of Columbus, commented:“The Company has successfully injected the first tranche of CO₂ in the Trinity Inniss field.  The CO₂ project is an important enhanced oil recovery project for both the Company and Trinidad. I look forward to updating the market as to the results of the CO₂ pilot project in due course.”Background – Trinity Inniss CO₂ ProjectAs previously announced, the term of the Trinity Inniss Incremental Production Service Contract (“IPSC”) has been extended to allow for the implementation of the CO₂ Pilot Project.The Company has now injected the first tank CO₂ into well AT5X in the Trinity Inniss field and will over time contribute to the determination of any impact on enhancement of production in offset wells to AT5X.   The Company and Predator, its joint venture partner, will proceed to continuous injection of CO₂ as is required to fully evaluate the potential of CO₂ injection to increase oil production from the offset wells.The Company’s interest in the Trinity Inniss field benefits from an agreement with Predator Oil and Gas plc (“Predator”), whereby Predator will help plan and fund the CO₂ EOR Pilot Project (the “CO₂ pilot project”).  As part of agreement with Predator, Predator has the right (until 30 September 2020) to purchase the Company’s interest in the Trinity Inniss field for US$4.2m. Source: Company Press Release The Company has now injected the first tank CO₂ into well AT5X in the Trinity Inniss field and will over time contribute to the determination of any impact on enhancement of production in offset wells to AT5Xlast_img read more

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E-GADS! by Jim Redwine

first_img Gavel GamutBy Jim Redwinewww.jamesmredwine.com(Week 19 December 2016)E-GADS!At a time when monks were reverently transcribing the Bible law clerks were laboriously writing down commandments issued by English monarchs. Often both were in Latin. Almost nobody but priests and lawyers could read Latin. The general public was told how it had sinned and why it was going to prison by these ecclesiastical and secular insiders.As the ability to read became more common, laws were written in English. However, the general public still found the legal system mysterious. But while many may question the validity of my thesis, I postulate the major thrust of America’s legal system in this modern era has been toward making the law less arcane and more accessible for lay people as legal professionals are gradually relegated to the role of cloistered monks.Today millions of citizens file and handle their own lawsuits. From divorces to property disputes and even murder trials people can and do represent themselves. Frequently the only role left for the legal profession is to try and repair the damage caused by an inarticulate lay resolution. As for judges, they are often relegated to simply signing their names to documents they had no role in crafting. And starting in 2017 in Posey County, Indiana, Electronic Filing will continue the march toward universal access to court records.Soon, other than for laypersons, all court filings and record keeping will be done electronically. E-Filing is what it will be called. Documents will be scanned and, except for a few confidential categories, will be available via the Internet. One will no longer have to resort to third party reports of cases. Instead of gleaning our gossip and satiating our curiosity at the coffee shop or the tavern we can go right to the source day or night.Now, after being embroiled in legal matters for almost half a century I might question the sanity of someone who finds Judge Judy and the like of any interest, but others may differ. If so, they will soon be able to emulate the Russian hackers without even needing to hack. I can envision millions of bleary-eyed voyeurs eschewing sleep to delve into the misfortunes of their fellow travelers electronically and a legal system where contact with an actual human being is as dead as Latin. For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Justices: Personalized licenses plates are government speech

first_img Justices: Personalized Licenses Plates Are Government Speech by Jennifer NelsonINDIANA BUREAU OF MOTOR VEHICLES, INDIANA SUPREME COURT, LAWSUITThe Indiana Supreme Court Friday upheld the Bureau of Motor Vehicles’ process for approving or denying requests for personalized license plates after finding the plates are government speech. A Marion County judge ruled last year the statute governing personalized license plates is unconstitutional.The class-action lawsuit stems from the BMV’s revocation of Rodney Vawter’s “0INK” license plate after he had been issued the plate for several years. When the BMV in 2013 rejected an Indiana Association of Chiefs of Police personalized license plate reading “O1NK,” the BMV’s computer system flagged Vawter’s plate as similar to a rejected plate. Vawter is a corporal in the Greenfield Police Department. The BMV then revoked Vawter’s personalized plate. After this lawsuit was filed, the BMV suspended its PLP program.The BMV, citing the Supreme Court of the United States decision in Walker v. Tex. Div., Sons of Confederate Veterans, Inc., 135 S.Ct. 2239, 192 L.Ed.2d 274 (2015), argues its decision-making process on PLPs is constitutional because personalized plates are government speech.In Walker, the Supreme Court identified a three-factor standard for identifying government speech: whether the government has historically used the medium to speak to the public; whether the message is closely identified in the public mind with the state; and the degree of control the state maintains over the messages conveyed.Using these factors, the Indiana justices concluded that Indiana’s PLPs are government speech.“While the alphanumeric combinations on PLPs are individually chosen instead of created by the state, this difference is secondary and does not change the principal function of state-issued license plates as a mode of unique vehicle identification,” Justice Brent Dickson wrote.Indiana speaks through its license plates, Dickson wrote, noting the slogans and images included on the plates over the years. There is an association of the message of the personalized plate with the state by the public and the BMV has effective control over the PLPs, the court held.The justices also addressed the plaintiffs’ argument that PLPs are private speech in a forum provided by the state, but found that argument misplaced because Indiana’s PLPs do not fit into any type of government forum for private speech.The case is Commissioner of the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles in his Official Capacity v. Rodney G. Vawter, et al., 49S00-1407-PL-494. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Ocean City Kids Add Personal Touch to Cards for Troops Overseas

first_imgBowfish Kids lent some of its young artistic talent on Saturday to an effort to create homemade holiday cards for U.S. troops stationed at an air base in Afghanistan.Shriver’s Salt Water Taffy and Fudge (Ninth Street and Boardwalk) is hoping to make its annual shipment of goodie bags to military personnel stationed overseas, and they’re looking for 350 cards.Bowfish Kids, the children’s clothing store at 14th Street and Boardwalk, encouraged its young customers to contribute, and they crafted 50 new cards on Saturday.Anybody who wants to contribute can stop by Bowfish on Sunday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to make more cards.People also can drop cards off at Shriver’s or mail them to Shriver’s at P.O. Box 899, Ocean City, NJ 08226. The store is hoping to ship by Dec. 10.last_img read more

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Craft Bakers’ Week to support Make-A-Wish charity

first_imgMoney raised from Craft Bakers’ Week 2014, which runs from 29 September to 5 October, will be donated to Make-A-Wish UK, organisers have announced.Make-A-Wish grants wishes to children and young people across the UK who are fighting life-threatening conditions.Bakers taking part in Craft Bakers’ Week will be encouraged to raise money for the charity through activities, customer donations and competitions.The campaign organisers will also be donating bakers’ registration fees to take part in the Week to the charity.The Make-A-Wish team will be supporting them, at a national and local level, with fundraising ideas and practical help.Keith Houliston, chair of Craft Bakers’ Week 2014 said: “We are delighted to be working with such a fantastic charity. Make-A-Wish aims to raise £7m this year and we hope Craft Bakers’ Week 2014 will be able to contribute and help turn wishes into a reality. We may even be able to grant a wish ourselves, if anyone wants to be a baker for a day.”Early birds can now sign up to take part in Craft Bakers’ Week 2014 online and, next month, bakers will receive a registration form so they can register by post. In return for their registration fee the bakers receive a pack of POS material, which is sent out nearer to the week itself.There are 20,000 children and young people living in the UK with a life-threatening condition and it’s Make-A-Wish’s aim to grant a wish to as many of these as possible every year.Craft Bakers’ Week will once again be calling on the public to ‘Love Your Baker’ this year.CampaignThe campaign will encourage people to visit their local high street craft baker and highlight the skills and range of produce, including regional specialities, that bakers make every day. Full details of this year’s campaign will be announced shortly.Craft Bakers’ Week is funded and supported by the Craft Bakers’ Association and Scottish Bakers, as well as British Baker, California Raisins, CSM, Bakels, Bako, BFP, Dawn, Ireks, Marriage’s, Macphie, Puratos, Reynards and Zeelandia.last_img read more

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The Disco Biscuits Are Heading To A New Location For New Years 2016

first_imgThe Disco Biscuits are switching things up this year, announcing that they will not return to the PlayStation Theater in New York’s Times Square area, instead bringing their annual New Years Eve run to the Tabernacle in Atlanta, Georgia. The band will play shows on December 29th and 30th, with a special New Years Eve show to end the run on the 31st.There’s a fan pre-sale for all three shows (including a three-day pass) starting Wednesday, 7/27 at 12:00pm that can be found by clicking here. We’ll provide more info on the Biscuits New Years Run as it becomes available.For New Yorkers who want to get their Biscuits jamming on, don’t miss the our upcoming Evolution of Jam performance featuring sets from Grateful Dead, Phish and Disco Biscuits tribute artists. More information about this exciting show, which is scheduled for October 7th at The Hall At MP, can be found here.last_img read more

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EXCLUSIVE: Polyrhythmics Debut Video For The Slinky And Psychedelic “Goldie’s Road”

first_imgUpcoming Polyrhythmics Tour Dates 2017September 9 – Anacortes, WA – Bastion Brewing CompanySeptember 20 – Philadelphia, PA – World Cafe LiveSeptember 21 – Washington, DC – Gypsy Sally’sSeptember 22 – Brooklyn, NY – The Knitting FactorySeptember 23 – Boston, MA – The Red RoomSeptember 26 – South Burlington, VT – Higher GroundSeptember 28 – Teaneck, NJ – Debonair Music HallSeptember 29 – Hartford, CT – Arch Street TavernSeptember 30 – Schuylkill Haven, PA – Meeting of the MindsOctober 27 – Winters CA – Berryessa Brewing CompanyOctober 29 – Placerville, CA – Hangtown Halloween BallOctober 31 – Phoenix, AZ – Last Exit LiveNovember 3 – Denver, CO – Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom *November 4 – Steamboat Springs, CO – Schmiggity’sNovember 9 – Garden City, ID – Visual Arts CollectiveNovember 10 – Bend, OR – Volcanic Theater and PubNovember 11 – Ashland, OR – Armory**November 17 – Eugene, OR – HiFi Music HallNovember 18 – Portland, OR – Star TheaterNovember 24 – Seattle, WA – Tractor Tavern ^November 25 – Seattle, WA – Tractor TavernDecember 1 – Springdale, UT – Bit & SpurDecember 2 – San Diego, CA – Winston’sDecember 5 – San Luis Obispo, CA – SLO BrewsDecember 6 – Santa Cruz , CA – Moes AlleyDecember 7 – Grass Valley, CA – Grass Valley Center for the ArtsDecember 8 – Crystal Bay, NV – Crystal Bay CasinoDecember 9 – San Francisco, CA – Slim’s* w/ Dumpstaphunk** w/ Dirty Revival^ w/ Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio Polyrhythmics, the Afrobeat funk-fusion eight-piece out of Seattle, Washington, is gearing up for a big year. While the group has already earned a dedicated following from coast to coast with their bold sound, tight grooves, and expert musicianship, the buzz around the band is growing with the upcoming release of their new album, Caldera, which is due out September 22nd. Caldera comes as a follow-up to Polyrhythmics’ critically acclaimed third studio album, Octagon, which catapulted the group into the national spotlight and earned them spots on bills with Snarky Puppy, Booker T, and more, as well as on lineups for big-name festivals, such as Bumbershoot, High Sierra, and Vancouver International Jazz Fest. For their fourth studio effort, Caldera is set to be similarly well-received, with the band offering a mesmerizing and eclectic album that showcases the unique sound rooted in funk, soul, psychedelic rock, R&B, progressive jazz, and Afrobeat.Polyrhythmics Expand Fall Tour Ahead Of New Album’s ReleaseAhead of the release of Caldera next month, Polyrhythmics is giving our readers a taste of what they’re all about with the release of the music video for “Goldie’s Road” off the new album. “Goldie’s Road” itself is slinky and trance-like, simultaneously laid back and eerie, all the while evoking tunes of the 1970’s with its old-school groove, psychedelic effects, and wah-wah heavy guitar. As trombonist Elijah Clark tells Live For Live Music, “‘Goldie’s Road’ is about the journey along a never traveled highway, and the experiences that an individual finds along that road are the destination itself. The song was composed primarily on melodica and trombone, the only two instruments I had at my disposal. It’s a piece written from the limitations of a location, but the freedom of a seemingly endless supply of time while trapped outside of city life. During the writing of ‘Goldie’s Road’, I was listening and absorbing a lot from Amharic musicians and songs such as Mulatu Astatke, Tilahun Gessesse, and Eritrean Krar music. I hope that a bit of the trance-like beauty of the Ethiopian and Eritrean tradition shines through in this song that is indicative of the sound of Polyrhythmics at a certain interval.”This new music video compliments the sound of “Goldie’s Road” nicely, with its sepia-drenched and ever-changing video collage using its simplistic presentation emphasizing the complexity of the music born from Polyrhythmics’ eight individual members. Live For Live Music is proud to present the premiere of Polyrhythmics’ new music video, and you can check it out for yourself below. You can also look below for Polyrhythmics’ upcoming tour dates or head to the band’s website for more information.last_img read more

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Searching for causes of bee colony collapse

first_imgThe efforts of environmental scientist Chensheng (Alex) Lu to study the effects of pesticide exposure on honeybees were chronicled in a Boston Globe Magazine cover story on June 23. The article described how Lu, associate professor of environmental exposure biology in the Department of Environmental Health, and two Massachusetts colleagues — Northbridge beekeeper Ken Warchol and Holden entrepreneur Dick Callahan — started collaborating in 2009 to examine why bees had begun dying at alarming rates since 2006, in a phenomenon known as “colony collapse disorder.” The article outlined the importance of bees to agriculture, political and business concerns surrounding the use of pesticides on crops, and the difficulty of pinpointing with certainty the causes of colony collapse.In the article, Lu described visiting hives being studied in Worcester County, Mass. in spring 2011 and finding that those exposed to the pesticide imadacloprid — a commonly used neonicotinoid — were all dead. “This is the replication of ‘Silent Spring,’” he told the Globe. While pesticides are “a tool that we cannot afford to lose,” Lu added, he thinks there is a responsible way to use them. “I think it can be done,” he said. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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New Assistant Dean.

first_imgUniversity of Georgia Professor David Bridges has been appointed assistant dean of the Tifton, Ga., campus of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, said CAES dean and director Gale Buchanan.Bridges replaces Phil Utley, the current assistant dean, who will retire in August. The Tifton campus consists of the Coastal Plain Experiment Station and the UGA Rural Development Center.”Dr. Bridges was selected following a national search for the perfect candidate to fill this very important position in our college,” Buchanan said. “We had a number of worthy candidates. It was a tough decision, but Dr. Bridges emerged clearly as the one most capable of providing effective leadership for the Tifton campus.”The Tifton campus assistant dean provides leadership for UGA CAES teaching, research and extension programs in south Georgia.”Dr. Bridges possesses all the traits that are important to assuring his success as assistant dean for our college in south Georgia,” Buchanan said. “He is a distinguished researcher, but he also has teaching and extension experience. He’s very forthright, has a high degree of dedication and is an extremely hardworking individual.”Bridges’ BackgroundA native of Terrell County, Ga., Bridges earned his first degree from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in agronomy from Auburn University and a Ph.D. in agronomy/weed science from Texas A&M University.He joined the UGA CAES faculty in 1987 at the Griffin, Ga., campus. In 1997, he reached the rank of professor in the college’s crop and soil sciences department.During his 14 years with UGA, Bridges has conducted agricultural research in a variety of areas related to weed management. He is now studying noncrop vegetation management, including vegetation management for enhancing wildlife habitat and pre- and postplanting herbaceous weed control for Conservation Reserve Program plantings.Bridges validated and released two computer programs that help county agents make weed-control decisions in soybeans and peanuts. He also developed the current framework for the CAES commodity web pages. These web pages provide current, research-based information on cotton, peanuts, soybeans, canola, small grains, tobacco and turf.Publications, Awards, GrantsTo date, Bridges’ research has resulted in more than 166 publications, including five books, seven book chapters, 58 refereed journal articles, 49 proceedings and 21 miscellaneous publications. He has attracted more than $1.6 million in grant funds from competitive sources and industry to UGA.Bridges has received many professional awards, including the Southern Weed Science Society’s Outstanding Young Weed Scientist award and the Weed Science Society of America’s Outstanding Young Scientist award.In 1993, a publication he co-authored was selected as Publication of the Year by the American Society for Horticultural Science. An active member of the Weed Science Society of America, he has served on and chaired many society committees.Bridges and his wife, Kim, a native of Irwin County, Ga., have two children: Rees, 18, and Morgan, 14. The family now lives in Pike County, Ga. David Bridges UGA CAES File Photolast_img read more

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