GAIL selling two, seeking one LNG cargo

first_imgLNG World News Staff Image courtesy of GAILState-run gas company GAIL India has reportedly offered a couple of U.S. liquefied natural gas cargoes for sale. Citing sources, Reuters reports the pair of cargoes will be loaded at Dominion’s Cove Point LNG facility on November 10-12 and December 16-18.Both cargoes are set for delivery to India.In addition, GAIL is looking to buy a single cargo for delivery to either Dahej or Dabhol LNG terminals. The delivery window is November 20 to 23.October 16 is reportedly set as the deadline day for bid submissions with the validity of the bids expiring on the same day.last_img

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Cardinals Battle Raiders In Hoops Action

first_imgThe St Louis Cardinals 7th Grade Boys Basketball team defeated the South Ripley Raiders tonight by a score of 36-23.Scoring for the Cardinals were Peyton Ditmer, Nate Vankirk, Alec Bunselmeier, Aiden Geers and Charlie Schebler. Conner Ertel, Ben Harmeyer, Noah Tuveson, Frank Forbeck and the rest of the Cardinals played good defense.With the win, the Cardinals record improves to 11-2. The Cardinals will be in action again this weekend as they play in the St. Bartholomew’s Battle of the Saints tournament in Columbus.Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Ryan Schebler.The St Louis 8th Grade Boys Basketball team were defeated by South Ripley Thursday night by a final score of 34 to 20.Abe Streator led the offense for St Louis finishing with 14 points.Courtesy of Cardinals Coach Mike Burkhart.last_img read more

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Boone checkers fly for Dickerson

first_imgBOONE, Iowa (June 11) – Russ Dickerson took charge by lap five of Saturday’s 20-lap main event for Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds and drove to his first win this season at Boone Speed­way.Dickerson started eighth and was content to let the others duke it out behind him.  He took the checkers by a comfortable margin.Denny Pittman held back point leader Mike Van Genderen until the final lap, when Van Genderen surged past to finish second, Pittman taking third.  A close fourth went to defending track cham­pion Jimmy Gustin, and Matthew Meinecke was fifth.  The race went caution-free after an initial no start.Rookie Cody Gustoff took advantage of his pole starting position, jumping to the immediate IMCA Sunoco Stock Car lead.  Craig Carlson, who had started right behind Gustoff, began pestering him and took over as leader at lap six.Carlson kept command of his lead, but in the closing moments had Donavon Smith, Jay Schmidt, and Tyler Pickett in a cluster behind him.  Smith dogged Carlson until the final lap, when he was able to get under him on the backstretch, beating him to the checkers for the win.Carlson held on to second while Schmidt, who started in row 11 after heat race woes, finished in third. Pickett finished fourth and Brad Te Grotenhuis took fifth. This was Smith’s third win of the year.Curtis Veber was the early leader in the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod 18-lapper. Jake McBirnie came from the ninth starting spot to take command at lap six.McBirnie was looking strong, but was soon being challenged by tenth place starter, Johnathon Logue.  Logue continued to pressure McBirnie, looking to his outside for a way around, when sud­denly at lap 15 McBirnie slowed and pulled into the infield.This handed the lead over to Logue, who motored the rest of the way home for the win. Randy Roberts came from 12th starting to finish as the runner-up, third went to Andy Tiernan, fourth was Thor Anderson and Adam Shelman took a very close fifth. The race went flag to flag. This was Logue’s second win of the season.Shawn Wirtz led the opening laps of the 12-lap IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock A main.  He was quickly challenged by Ross Marshall. Marshall was able to slip under Wirtz to take the lead on lap five.  From there on, Marshall pulled away for a convincing win, his first ever at Boone.  Wirtz fin­ished in second ahead of Jordan Peters, 12th starter Eric Stanton and Todd Bass.last_img read more

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Rory McIlroy shines as Jordan Spieth struggles to keep pace in Abu Dhabi

first_img Press Association McIlroy had insisted he was not concerned about laying down a marker to Spieth after being drawn with the Masters and US Open champion, but the four-time major winner certainly made an impression with an opening 66. “It was a masterclass, the Rory that I have seen win major championships,” Spieth said after a birdie on the last ensured he finished just two shots behind McIlroy and four behind fellow American Bryson DeChambeau, a 22-year-old amateur who topped the leaderboard. “I t was a pretty unbelievable round on a very challenging golf course. If he keeps striking it like that, I’m going to have to make up for it somewhere else. M inus one or two short putts, which is mainly just rust, it felt like he was on his A game.” McIlroy did not touch a club for eight weeks after winning the DP World Tour Championship in November, but the only evidence of rust came with two three-putt bogeys, each of which he immediately followed with a brace of birdies. “It was a great way to start the year,” said McIlroy, who has finished second in Abu Dhabi four times in the last five years. “I felt in practice last week I was swinging well and I came back mentally fresh and excited to play again. I could not be happier. “I drove the ball well and that’s one of the secrets around this course because if you hit it into the rough, it’s difficult just to reach the green. I missed a few putts but holed a few I probably shouldn’t have so it all evens out.” Spieth, who started his year by shooting 30 under par to win the Tournament of Champions in Hawaii by eight shots, admitted his driving was “short and crooked” for most of the day, but was more concerned with receiving a “monitoring penalty” on the penultimate hole. ” It was a bit odd,” said the world number one, who will be fined £2,000 if he transgresses again. “I got a bad time on my putt on the eighth when they took us off the clock on that green and the guys behind us hadn’t even reached the fairway on a par five. “I understand that if you are being timed and you are taking longer than the allotted time, you get a bad time. I understand the rule but it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense when our group had caught up.” McIlroy sympathised with Spieth and felt officials should use “common sense” as they were not out of position, but that cut little ice with European Tour chief referee John Paramor. ” Pace of play on the European Tour is measured by whether a group keeps to the starting interval between groups, rather than if they are on the same hole, as it is in America,” Paramor said. “Jordan was assessed a monitoring penalty after his putt on the eighth hole, which I advised him of as he walked to the ninth tee.” Under a revised pace of play policy approved only on Tuesday by the Tour’s tournament committee, any player exceeding the time allowed for a shot – 50 seconds if playing first, 40 seconds thereafter – while being monitored, will be given a monitoring penalty. The group of Spieth, McIlroy and Rickie Fowler were being monitored from the fourth hole, with Fowler’s time-consuming drop in a waste area on the second hole believed to be largely responsible. Early leader DeChambeau became the fifth player after Jack Nicklaus, Phil Mickelson, Tiger Woods and Ryan Moore to win the NCAA and US Amateur titles in the same season last year, but has also made headlines for his unique approach to the game. The physics graduate describes himself as a “golf scientist” and has modified his irons so that they are all the length of a six iron, while he uses water and Epsom salts to establish which of his golf balls are slightly flawed (he says about four per dozen) so they can be discarded. “It was quite incredible,” DeChambeau said of his round, which contained seven birdies, an eagle and one bogey. “I had no expectations and was just able to freewheel a little bit and that allows me to do my best.” At eight under par DeChambeau led by one from Henrik Stenson, who also started with low expectations after having keyhole surgery on his right knee just six weeks ago. ”It was a bit of grind, more for my foot and hip than the knee, but I just have to take it easy and pace myself,” the world number five said. ” ‘I have missed the cut here the last two years so it was nice to get a good round in early.” Jordan Spieth fell foul of a crackdown on slow play as a “masterclass” from Rory McIlroy ensured the world number three won their first duel of the year at the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship.last_img read more

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Biden Leads the Democrat Field Before Debates in Detroit

first_imgFormer Vice President Joe Biden is surging among Democrats running for president.A new national Quinnipiac Poll shows Biden leading among Democrats and those leaning Democrat with 34%.Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is second at 15%, followed by California Senator Kamala Harris at 12% and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders at 11%.Round two as 20-Democrat presidential candidates are set to debate in Detroit.Tonight’s lineup: Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, Beto O’Rourke,Amy Klobuchar, John Hickenlooper, Steve Bullock, Tim Ryan, John Delaney and self-help author Marianne Williamson. Jen and Bill will talk with Eric Trump tomorrow morning at 8:45 about tonight’s debate and what to expect from the leading dem Joe Biden tomorrow night.last_img

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Christianburg -Wismar `Multi’ Secondary retain overall title

first_imgWHEN the dust was settled on Friday, the Upper Demerara/ Kwakwani District 10 Schools Committee confirmed that defending champions, Christianburg -Wismar ‘Multi’ Secondary School had retained their overall Champion of Champions crown when the Inter Secondary Schools Track and Field, Swimming, Cycling and Teachers’ championships culminated at the Mackenzie Sports Club ground.By virtue of winning two of the titles at this year’s championships, the Teachers’ and Cycling segments, despite losing the war on the track and field to Mackenzie High School, the ‘Multi’ ran out victors of the battle for the overall supremacy.Some amount of confusion crept in on Thursday night after the Christianburg-Wismar Secondary had lost to Mackenzie High School, many felt, including some officials, that Linden Foundation had carted off the overall title.But this was not to be and a recount the next day amounted to the fact that the ‘Multi’ team had successfully retained their crown.The ‘Multi’ side, by winning the teachers and cycling titles and placing third in the track and field and fourth in the swimming, amassed 71 pints.Placing second was Linden Foundation Secondary who copped one tile and placed second and third in two others to gain 68.5 points and pipped Mackenzie High School who came out with one win– the track and field– and got a second and fifth place to accumulate 68.5 points.The swimming championship was held at the Watooka Pool and there was a most impressive start to the eagerly-awaited track and field championships which saw some spectacular running by the athletes in general which is an indication that the defending National Schools champions, District 10, (Upper Demerara/ Kwakwani) are going to be ready for a successful defence of their title once more.last_img read more

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After addition of Notre Dame, ACC switches to 8-game conference schedule beginning in 2013

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ The Atlantic Coast Conference will feature an eight-game conference schedule starting in 2013, rather than the nine-game slate originally planned, the league announced in a press release on Wednesday.The conference made that change and revised its scheduling for basketball due to the addition of Notre Dame in September.Last February, the ACC announced its plan for a nine-game conference schedule when Syracuse and Pittsburgh began competition. But after the Fighting Irish agreed to play five football games against ACC opponents each year while joining the league for all other sports by 2015 at the latest, conference officials decided to go back to the eight-game model.“The addition of Notre Dame gives us an opportunity to reinforce a number of conference rivalries in basketball and Olympic sports while also giving our schools greater flexibility in nonconference football scheduling,” ACC Commissioner John Swofford said in the release. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe men’s and women’s basketball schedules will remain 18 games as planned, but the conference gave each school two primary partners to highlight rivalries.Syracuse was matched with Pittsburgh and former Big East rival Boston College.Schools will play each league opponent once and their partners twice — once on the road and once at home — every season. Comments Published on October 3, 2012 at 3:02 pm Contact Ryne: rjgery@syr.edulast_img read more

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Riley Donahue hopes to build off family’s success as Syracuse freshman

first_imgFrom a young age, Riley Donahue has been around Syracuse lacrosse.As a 4-year-old, Donahue rode the men’s team’s bus to the final four with her father, assistant coach Kevin Donahue.Spending time in lacrosse with him and at his former high school, West Genesee (New York) High School, helped build her foundation for lacrosse.“I feel like those are big moments of my childhood,” Donahue said, “because I thought that was so cool.”While those moments have been critical to her development as a lacrosse player, Donahue is going down her own path. Kevin Donahue was an All-American in 1979 and since then, three of Donahue’s uncles and two brothers — including her brother Dylan Donahue, who leads the SU men’s lacrosse team with 52 points this season — have played lacrosse at SU.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDonahue is the third-leading scorer for Syracuse women’s team this season and has overcome a rough two-game stretch against Notre Dame and North Carolina. In the last two games, she has three goals and three assists, helping the No. 7 Orange (11-6, 3-4 Atlantic Coast) pick up two consecutive wins. She is the only freshman to start and play in every game this season.“I came here not just because they were here, just because I wanted to come here,” Donahue said. “It just felt right. I couldn’t imagine going anywhere else even if they didn’t go here.”During Winter Break, SU head coach Gary Gait saw her working with Kevin Donahue in Manley Field House. She was working on improving her shooting and the first steps of her dodges. At times her father took her behind the net to give her a different perspective of the field.Donahue and her brother came to campus throughout Winter Break to work out. While they did so separately, he helped her with her shooting. Kevin Donahue said that his daughter understood what it would take to play because her brother provided the pattern.“She knew how hard it was going to be when she got here, she knew she had a great opportunity to play here and she knew how hard she had to work,” Dylan Donahue said. “So I think she just took control of it herself.”And she has.She missed four shots in SU’s loss against UNC, and worked after practice later the next week, peppering goalie Melina Woon Avery with shots as defender Kathy Rudkin fed her passes. Donahue had worked on shooting the ball earlier on free positions.In her last two games she’s converted on three of five shots. Against Albany, she caught a Kayla Treanor pass at the beginning of the second half as she moved to the right of the crease. Donahue moved her stick left and bounced a shot into the top left corner.Her father has seen improvement in her ability to move without the ball since she was in high school. Donahue said she has learned how to cut backdoor behind players.“She’s really been trained well how to move off-ball, in particular,” Kevin Donahue said. “She didn’t have to do that in high school.”Even her number is a derivative of her family’s number. Until this season, she wore No. 17 because her brothers wore the number. When she was younger, she always wanted to wear No. 4 and her family laughed about it. Now she wears No. 47— a little twist on a family tradition.And the postseason could give Donahue a chance to put a twist on the family’s legacy, too.She could add her own conference or national championship to the Donahues’ mantle. She could help win the school’s first women’s national championship in any sport.But one thing is certain — this bus ride will be hers.“That would be everything,” Donahue said. “I feel like I’ve always wanted that moment and just because of going to so many of theirs, I was just thinking that could be me someday.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 21, 2015 at 9:21 pm Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonatilast_img read more

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EdiBOL’s dishes boast fresh, unique ingredients

first_imgAt downtown Los Angeles’ Arts District, food is definitely an art form. New restaurants have popped up throughout  the area, each trying to achieve the most aesthetically pleasing cuisine. EdiBOL, which opened over the summer, is one of the newest additions to the Arts District’s wide array of culinary hot spots.EdiBOL focuses on food served in bowls, from salads (coolBOLs) to rice dishes (hotBOLs) and an assortment of other small dishes (littleBOLs).  The owner, Andrea Uyeda, serves only locally sourced, seasonal ingredients to create the freshest and most flavorful dishes possible. Though the menu has an Asian feel to it, each dish is completely one-of-a-kind and each bite has a flavor of its own.For any restaurant, location is key to success, and Edibol’s prime spot in One Santa Fe ensures a promising future. The newly built development is comprised of luxury apartments, boutique stores and restaurants that meld together to create a popular place to live or visit that inspires creativity and generates positive thoughts. There are many other establishments opening up this summer in One Santa Fe, including AmazeBowl and Grow, a fresh produce grocery store. The complex is made up of many great elements; red accents on the white buildings give the property a unique edge that intrigues pedestrians and urges them to explore the area. The restaurant is easy to locate, and the site offers free parking, which is incentive enough to explore the area.EdiBOL’s interior décor captures the essence of the Arts District. The industrial-style restaurant is composed of concrete pillars, visible vents and pipes lining the ceiling, which harmoniously accompany the deep blue color used throughout the eatery. The dark wood found on the back wall and on the counter at the bar gives the restaurant a calm atmosphere. Blue-and-gray marbled tabletops and zigzag patterns found on certain parts of the wall are a reminder of the unique and creative setting. Even the restaurant’s logo, a circle with its name written inside it — “edi” written small and “BOL” written largely underneath it — is a fun play on the fact that the menu consists solely of food served in bowls and encapsulates the creativity of the restaurant as whole. The restaurant’s service matches the cool and relaxed atmosphere that the  decor has created. Waiters are helpful and take the time to explain the menu and help you order as the unusual dish titles are a bit confusing at first glance. The calmness of the waiters has no effect on the speed of service; the food is prepared and delivered as quickly as possible, which is evident in the freshness of the meal.Just like everything else about the restaurant, the menu is very unique. Each dish is completely different from the next, but they all have an incredible variety of flavors. The restaurant’s creator, Andrea Uyeda, handpicks the ingredients. She chooses only the best fruits and vegetables of the season to maximize the freshness of each dish. There are other interesting components in the dishes as well, from togarashi to rajas. Don’t be discouraged by the fact that many of the ingredients in the dishes are slightly strange; the staff is very helpful in describing flavors and dishes as a whole. They give great ideas of what the dish will taste like, whether it will be spicy or plain and if there are any overwhelming flavors. The most popular dishes on the menu are the BOLicious and the pretzel grilled cheese.In the honey citrus coolBOL and BOLicious with shrimp, it is clear that a lot of thought goes into the ingredients in each dish. Each component of the two dishes blends together so that every bite is a combination of fresh produce and unique taste, making the entire experience of eating a BOL exciting.One especially intriguing item on the menu is the poached egg, which is a part of some of the hotBOLs and can be added to any coolBOL. The egg appears to be fried in breadcrumbs, but the crispy brown outside is so much lighter than that found on most fried food items. The egg’s perfectly crisp outside is juxtaposed with the soft and runny inside, making it a very distinctive addition to any dish.The menu also includes great drinks and desserts, drinkaBOLs and crumBOLs, respectively, and a selection of “little BOLs,” which allow you to mix and match several small dishes for your meal. The menu is relatively reasonable, averaging about $9 for a filling and flavorful bowl.EdiBOL is an excellent spot for a nice, and not too time consuming, lunch, dinner, weekday breakfast or weekend brunch that will definitely please taste buds and leave customers feeling healthy and happy.last_img read more

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L.A. Coliseum has a history all its own

first_imgOn a picturesque Memorial Day afternoon in Southern California, I ventured out into the streets of Los Angeles in search of the city’s most historic landmark.In a city often defined by glitz and glamour, I don’t think you could have blamed me for choosing the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the Santa Monica Pier or even Grauman’s Chinese Theatre.But for me — an outsider simply looking for a destination that could capture the essence of this metropolis’ vast history — the venue was a simple choice: the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, celebrating its 87th anniversary last month.As I walked toward the stadium, it became apparent that this impromptu history lesson would be short-lived, as metal gates surrounded the now-dormant facility.While the trip would not provide this inquisitive visitor with the up-close experience I had envisioned, one look through the aging peristyle arches was more than enough. As I glanced beyond the entrance façade and beneath the Olympic cauldron, the summer-cut lawn and endless array of seats were all I could see.I stood there enthralled for a few moments, grinned a little to myself and soon departed for home.On a day often celebrated with a large barbeque or a swim at the beach, it’s easy to understand why my adventure to a lifeless sports stadium would garner puzzled looks and skeptical inquiries from those of you reading these words.But to me, an individual who still hasn’t grasped the beauty and tradition of this City of Angels, what more fitting destination on a day of remembrance than the Coliseum — a place whose hallowed grounds provide a unique connection between the past and present.In 1921, as the nation began to recover from the losses sustained during the first World War, the city of Los Angeles, behind a lucrative (at the time, at least) $950,000 investment, determined the best way to memorialize the efforts of the war’s veterans was to commission an athletic stadium in their honor.What ensued from this gesture no one could have foreseen.When the gates opened in May 1923, the majestic 76,000-seat creation of John and Donald Parkinson, single-handedly transformed the role of a sporting venue from merely a host to the canvas by which many of this city’s defining masterpieces were painted on.From the Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984 (the Coliseum is the only site in the world to host two Olympics), to the NFL’s first Super Bowl (also hosted Super Bowl VII), to the 1959 World Series (which became the first Fall Classic games to be played on the West Coast and only to ever reach over 90,000 fans in attendance per game), to the four professional and two collegiate football teams to call this place home (Dons, Chargers, Rams, Raiders, UCLA and USC), the Coliseum’s walls tell the type of story to whet any die-hard sports fan’s appetite.While this prestigious institution holds the memories of some of history’s most memorable athletic performances, what makes the Coliseum more than just a legendary stadium is its commitment to maintaining a near-century-long legacy.When you can boast a who’s who of visitors that at some point in their illustrious careers made your cement-clad structure their muse or individual stage (Jesse Owens, Willie Mays, Sandy Koufax, John F. Kennedy, Nelson Mandela and Pope John Paul II, just to name a few) it’s hard to resist getting caught up in the sports industry’s current approach on how to make venues into household names.While the importance of stadiums has essentially shifted from preserving what was once thought to be the timeless annals of our most prized games to how can we better appease a commercialism-driven society, the Coliseum has remained relatively true to its initial intention: a memorial.No, the Coliseum does not have any of the modern-day, trendy architectural features that are often commonplace around the country these days.It’s not ornate, easily accessible for visitors or particularly fan-friendly when it comes to amenities.Not every seat in the house is a good seat, the wealthy won’t find any luxurious boxes to escape the grimy, crowded stands filled with loud-mouthed sports enthusiasts and, to be frank, it doesn’t reside in a part of town that is famous for its glitz.Though it has undergone four renovations in its eight-plus decades as a city monument, each tweak and improvement never tarnished or erased the imprint of its presence.The Coliseum that welcomed in a new era of athletic achievement and ingenuity in the field of structural design with a USC football victory over Pomona College back in October 1923 still stands as the central tapestry in a city whose fabric is woven together by entertainment and tradition.While Angelenos remain content for now with having USC as the only tenants to call the Coliseum home — as long as we keep winning, of course — the NFL is destined to make a return to trip to Los Angeles. The question isn’t if, it’s simply when.One day when the ink from this article fades and men with more money than they know what to do with finally devise a plan that sticks, will this city still marvel at the lasting foundation it helped create over these last 87 years?Will high-definition scoreboards, cushy stadium seats and lavish business suites manufacture enough sentiment to overtake this living, breathing testament to the city’s storied past?As I took one final peek over my shoulder at the renowned edifice, these questions ran through my mind until I was stopped in my tracks by a man wearing an American flag bandana, who looked as worn as the stadium he now stood beneath.Instinctually, I reached into my pocket for some change, but he cut me off.“Ain’t she something, a gem.”I smiled and shook my head in agreement. He was spot on. It’s a real diamond in the rough.“For The Love Of The Game” runs every other Wednesday. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Dave at dulberg@usc.edu.last_img read more

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