Man 80s seriously injured after being hit by car in Ballyfermot last

first_img By Sean Murray The incident occurred on Ballyfermot road A MAN IN his mid-80s remains in critical condition this morning, after he was struck by a car in west Dublin last night.The man was hit by the car at around 11.30pm on Ballyfermot road in the Dublin suburb.He was removed to St James’s Hospital where he remains in a serious condition this morning.It is understood that gardaí had closed the road off until around 4.30am this morning, and traffic has now resumed on the road.The incident took place is a residential area facing a number of shops and pubs.Read: Woman (20s) dies in house fire in LimerickRead: Skin cancer deaths in Ireland: One in four are construction workers or farmers Image: Google Maps Share Tweet Email Monday 1 May 2017, 11:04 AM http://jrnl.ie/3367602 1 Comment center_img Short URL Man (80s) seriously injured after being hit by car in Ballyfermot last night The man was struck by a car on Ballyfermot road at 11.30pm last night. 10,859 Views The incident occurred on Ballyfermot road Image: Google Maps May 1st 2017, 11:04 AM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Murder accused said he fell asleep in front of TV after beating

first_img Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 22,545 Views Roy Webster leaving court in 2015 Mar 14th 2017, 6:15 PM By eoin Share Tweet Email http://jrnl.ie/3287696 No Comments center_img A MURDER ACCUSED told gardaí he went home for dinner and fell asleep in front of his TV after beating a woman to death with a hammer, his trial heard today.The jury has heard evidence that Anne Shortall told Roy Webster she was pregnant with his child and wanted money for an abortion, but it emerged today that a pathologist’s report showed she was not pregnant.Roy Webster (40) from Ashbree, Ashford, Co Wicklow has pleaded not guilty to murder but guilty to the manslaughter of Anne Shortall (47) on Good Friday, 3 April, 2015 at the Murrough, Co Wicklow. His plea was not accepted by the State.Detective Sergeant Fergus O’Brien told prosecuting counsel Paul Greene SC he interviewed Webster at Wicklow Garda Station on 7 April, 2015. During that interview Webster told gardaí he hit Shortall on the head with a hammer “three or four times” after she threatened to tell his wife about their affair.He said he felt like he was having an out of body experience, watching himself attack her, but once it was done “it was like I was back in my own skin”. He said he drove to a Centra shop, called his wife, returned home, had a cup of coffee, ate dinner and fell asleep on the couch in front of the television. “It was like everything was back to normal, like I was myself again,” he said.‘Like watching a horror movie’ Detailing the build-up to the attack, he said he and Shortall met in Wicklow town and she got into his van. She told him she was pregnant from the sexual encounter they had the previous Christmas and wanted £6,500 (about €7,400) to travel to England for an abortion. He told her he wanted proof that she was pregnant, but she told him it was true and she didn’t need to prove it.He said she “started to go off” and threatened to ring his wife. “I was thinking to myself, ‘This can’t be happening’,” he said, but she kept telling him she knew where he lived and was going to “blow the lid” if he didn’t give her the money.He told gardaí he begged her: ‘Please don’t, please don’t. I have a wife and child. Don’t ruin that for me.’ He said his head was spinning. “I could see my whole world coming down,” he said.By now he was out of the van and was standing beside her at the passenger side door. He wanted to reason with her, he said, but then he swung the van door open and took the first thing he saw, a hammer. “I hit her a belt with the hammer and she fell back in the van,” he said.Webster told gardai she was still conscious and said to him ‘You fucking prick. I will fucking ruin you.’He said he hit her four or five times. It felt like he was looking at someone else doing it, “like watching a horror movie,” he said. Afterwards, he couldn’t believe what had happened. “I was petrified,” he said. “It was like she had me against a wall.”He said he then taped up her head, thinking the tape might stop the bleeding, and taped her hands “to stop her flailing around”. He said he didn’t know she was dead and that it was “like I was out of my mind”. He described his feelings as a mixture of “fear and panic” and said he had not intended to kill her.‘Pyjama day’ With her bloodied body still in the van he drove to a nearby Centra “on autopilot”. At the shop he rang his wife and asked her if she needed anything. “It was like I was back in my own skin,” he said. He then went home and went inside with Anne’s body still in the van.He had a cup of coffee, describing the feeling as like a switch had been turned off. “I didn’t think about it any more,” he said, adding that he got into his routine. He had dinner, watched television and fell asleep on the couch. “It was like I blanked it,” he added.The following day he went to Arklow with his wife to do some shopping. Later that day he was getting logs for the fire and needed something from the van. When he opened the van door he saw Anne’s body and thought, ‘I will have to get her out’.He put her in his workshop, but was surprised she was so stiff so quickly. The next day, Easter Sunday, he had a “pyjama day”.When gardaí asked him why he taped her up, the accused said he didn’t know and he wasn’t thinking straight. “I wasn’t really thinking at all,” he added.Gardaí asked him if he knew she was going to die in his van and he said: “I’m not a doctor. I wouldn’t know how much blood you would have to lose before you die.”When gardaí told him that the pathologist’s report showed she had been struck on the head nine times he said he didn’t remember hitting her that many times. When they said she had bruising on her neck he said he had no recollection of manhandling her.Gardaí asked: ‘Why did you kill her?’ and he responded: “I hit her because she was threatening my family and my livelihood.”As the interview continued the pathology report by State Pathologist Marie Cassidy confirmed that Shortall was not pregnant. When he heard this Webster said: “I fucking knew it.”The trial continues tomorrow in front of Justice Patrick McCarthy and a jury of seven men and four women.Comments are closed as legal proceedings are ongoing. Read: Roy Webster ‘broke down and told gardaí he beat woman to death with a hammer’, court hears Roy Webster leaving court in 2015 Image: Rónán Duffy/TheJournal.ie Image: Rónán Duffy/TheJournal.ie Tuesday 14 Mar 2017, 6:15 PM Murder accused said he fell asleep in front of TV after beating woman to death with hammer Roy Webster has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of Anne Shortall in 2015. Short URLlast_img read more

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Marine convicted of murdering defenceless Taliban fighter has sentence reduced

first_img Claire Blackman, the wife of Alexander Blackman, with supporters, outside the High Court in London today. Source: Lauren Hurley/PA ImagesA LONDON COURT today reduced the conviction of a British soldier found guilty of killing an injured Taliban fighter to manslaughter from murder, in a high-profile case that has divided the country.Alexander Blackman is currently in jail for shooting the fighter at close range in Afghanistan’s Helmand Province on 15 September 2011, after the Afghan was seriously injured by fire from an Apache helicopter.“There you are. Shuffle off this mortal coil… It’s nothing you wouldn’t do to us,” Blackman was heard saying, paraphrasing Shakespeare’s Hamlet, in footage captured by a camera on a soldier’s helmet.“Obviously this doesn’t go anywhere, fellas. I just broke the Geneva Convention,” he said to his fellow Royal Marines, a reference to international laws governing the treatment of prisoners of war. Source: PA Wire/PA ImagesBlackman was convicted by a court martial in 2013 and sentenced to life in prison with a 10-year minimum.The sentence was later reduced to eight years to take into account the fact that he was suffering from combat stress disorder – the same reason given by the judges today for downgrading his conviction.A further hearing, whose date has not been set, will decide what sentence he still has to serve.His wife, Claire, who has spearheaded a public campaign involving best-selling author Frederick Forsyth and many veterans, said she was “delighted” by the ruling.“This is a crucial decision and one which better reflects the circumstances my husband found himself in during that terrible tour in Afghanistan,” she told reporters outside the court.She said she hoped for “a significant reduction” in Blackman’s sentence. Source: Lauren Hurley/PA ImagesThe case marked the first time since World War II that a British soldier was convicted of a murder carried out on the battlefield.“You treated that Afghan man with contempt and murdered him in cold blood,” judge Jeff Blackett told Blackman at his court martial in 2013.“By doing so you have betrayed your corps and all British service personnel who have served in Afghanistan, and you have tarnished their reputation,” Blackett said.The conviction was supported by Britain’s chief of the defence staff at the time, Nicholas Houghton, who said: “Murder is murder, this is a heinous crime.”But on Wednesday the judges said that Blackman was suffering from a “combination of stressors” that impaired his ability to make rational judgments.They said it was “clear that a consequence was that he had developed a hatred for the Taliban and a desire for revenge”.© – AFP 2017Read: Murder investigation launched after child found dead near OxfordRead: The Northeast US is a slippery mess thanks to Storm Stella http://jrnl.ie/3288749 Wednesday 15 Mar 2017, 12:47 PM Share Tweet Email Marine convicted of murdering defenceless Taliban fighter has sentence reduced Blackman was filmed murdering the injured fighter (and paraphrasing Shakespeare’s Hamlet) in footage captured by a camera on a soldier’s helmet. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article By AFP 14,572 Views Short URL Mar 15th 2017, 12:47 PM 61 Comments last_img read more

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Gardaí to the rescue after dog found locked inside car in todays

first_imgGardaí to the rescue after dog found locked inside car in today’s soaring temperatures “Never lock animals in cars,” the gardaí warned. 44,415 Views Short URL Jun 19th 2017, 8:35 PM Source: Garda Info/Twitter A MEMBER OF the public raised the alarm to gardaí today, after spotting a dog trapped inside a locked car. Monday 19 Jun 2017, 8:35 PM Share1894 Tweet Email center_img Temperatures reached the high 20s again today across the country, and it’s set to be just as hot again tomorrow.The dog was spotted inside the car at a shopping centre, the gardaí said.The ISPCA has warned in the past that even a car parked in the shade in hot temperatures can cause an animal locked inside to suffer heatstroke or even die.The gardaí said that, luckily in this case, the dog was “ok after a drink”.They also issued a warning to people to never lock animals in cars.Read: Dog owners warned to keep pets on a leash after ‘savage’ sheep attacksRead: Seven dogs had to be put down after being found in ‘deplorable’ conditions Eagle eyed public at S/Centre alerted Gardaí to dog locked in car in todays soaring temp.He was ok after a drink!Never lock animals in cars pic.twitter.com/ZljuLxQ2bc— Garda Info (@gardainfo) June 19, 2017 http://jrnl.ie/3452906 60 Comments By Sean Murray Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Tens of thousands of Irish firms havent registered to move goods to

first_imgGiven that this is effectively a free €2,250 grant for professional consultancy, there is no reason that any business with a Brexit exposure should not have applied for it already. It’s not too late for companies to act.In a survey carried out by Isme of its members for the first quarter of this year, 68% of firms said they had not yet completed a Brexit readiness plan. Meanwhile, customs arrangements are the biggest cause of concern for SMEs, with over 60% saying it was a major worry when the UK leaves the EU. Business group Ibec, meanwhile, has said that no matter what Brexit scenario Ireland is ultimately faced with, it is important to have the appropriate preparations in place.Arnold Dillon, Ibec Head of Strategic Campaigns, told TheJournal.ie: “Brexit uncertainty has now forced many companies to trigger expensive contingency plans. Taking a ‘no deal’ cliff edge off the table is the priority, but business also needs clarity on how a ‘no deal’ outcome would be managed on the ground, from day one.Even in worst case scenarios, we will need a phased transition to a new trading relationship and a compliance trajectory that minimises disruption. Adjusting to a radically new trading relationship with the UK at the end of March is neither possible or realistic. Related Read Saturday 16 Mar 2019, 12:05 AM ‘Worrying’The Irish Small-Medium-sized Enterprise Association (Isme) has said it is “worried at the low uptake of EORI numbers”, adding that they are “very east to get”. “There’s also low take-up of the start-to-plan vouchers, which we understand from InterTrade Ireland is in the high hundreds only,” a spokesperson said.  Revenue has written to over 14,000 businesses in Dublin alone 08.02.19 Sky News poll shows Brexit has damaged UK’s reputation for majority of Irish people Short URL As the clock ticks down, get all the best Brexit news and analysis in your inbox: https://jrnl.ie/4538704 13,605 Views Image: Shutterstock/islavicekcenter_img TENS OF THOUSANDS of Irish businesses have been told they haven’t registered to move goods to and from the UK after Brexit, with uncertainty continuing on what the landscape will look like once our closest neighbour eventually leaves the EU.Although we now know it’s more likely that the UK won’t be leaving the EU as originally set out on 29 March, this persistent uncertainty has forced many companies to trigger expensive contingency plans, business groups say.The no-deal tariff plans published by the British government was just the latest in a string of announcements that caused alarm in Ireland earlier this week, but Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said in Washington that a package of measures to support Irish businesses will be approved by Cabinet next week. The Taoiseach told businesses that the government “has your back on Brexit” but firms have also been warned to step up their preparations with Brexit remaining a major threat for many.EORIAn Economic Operators Registration and Identification (EORI) is something that businesses must register for if wish to move goods to, from or through a non-EU country. When the UK leaves the EU, businesses will need an EORI to move goods to, from or through the UK. As of the beginning of this month, however, over 60,000 businesses who may need one hadn’t got an EORI. If the UK was to leave the EU without a deal on 29 March – which was ruled out by MPs earlier this week – it would have meant uncertainty for businesses that don’t have an EORI.It is clear from the statistics that businesses were becoming increasingly aware of the need to step up their Brexit plans since the start of this year.In the whole of 2018, there were 2,976 registrations for an EORI. In January and February 2019, there 2,617. Last month, Revenue advised that there were around 100 applications per day, with applications in February up 330% on January.And, since January, Revenue has written to around 84,000 businesses – who from its records show they recently had at least some level of trade with the UK – and encouraged them to do a Brexit impact assessment for their business. Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe, in responding to a parliamentary question, also released a breakdown of the amount of businesses which don’t have an EORI written to by Revenue by county.Dublin had by far the most with over 14,000 businesses. Next was Cork with 6,183. Donegal and Galway had over 3,000 businesses contacted by Revenue. Only Carlow, Laois, Leitrim, Longford, Offaly and Roscommon had less than 1,000 businesses without an EORI. Mar 16th 2019, 12:06 AM Share4 Tweet Email9 Tens of thousands of Irish firms haven’t registered to move goods to and from the UK post-Brexit Business groups have said the low numbers of companies acquiring their EORI so far is worrying. By Sean Murray Revenue has written to over 14,000 businesses in Dublin alone Image: Shutterstock/islavicek 9 Comments Dillon added that it was urgent that the Irish government make provisions to introduce State aid measures for businesses most impacted by Brexit.“A ‘no deal’ Brexit would present an unprecedented economic challenge that would demand immediate state aid intervention to save businesses and protect jobs in certain sectors and business that are particularly exposed,” he said.Leo Varadkar’s government has already signalled it would aim to secure EU backing to support businesses at risk financially.In January, Minister for Business Heather Humphreys met with European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager.“The focus of our meeting centred on the severe challenges Irish businesses, especially SMEs, would face when the United Kingdom left the European Union,” she said. “The Commissioner emphasised that the Commission stood ready to act urgently to mitigate the impact of Brexit on Irish firms.”The European Commission has already given State aid approval for national investment in Irish cheese producers the Carbery Group to the tune of €65 million. “This test case demonstrates what we want to do for the food sector,” Humphreys said.Speaking yesterday in London, Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe said Ireland will wish to avoid a series of “rolling cliff edges” if the UK requests a delay “I believe it is highly important that we do all we can to avoid being in a scenario of rolling cliff edges… particularly from a financial market stability perspective and economic stability, we need to be aware of that,” he said.Uncertainty may remain, but Irish businesses now have some time to put the necessary provisions in place while the government takes its own steps to offer support until the UK finally leaves the EU.  Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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A truly remarkable person Tributes paid to Trócaire worker of 37 years

first_img Apr 8th 2019, 5:19 PM Her legacy will live on through the thousands of people whose lives she helped to improve. O’Neill had also worked in Central America at a time when civil wars were being fought in El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua. She oversaw humanitarian aid to more than two million refugees in the Central American region during those conflicts years. In 1982, O’Neill and President Michael D Higgins, who was a TD at the time, visited El Salvador to investigate reports of a massacre in the village of El Mozote. She was appointed by President Higgins as a member of the High Level Panel for the Presidential Distinguished Service Award for the Irish Abroad in 2012 and awarded the Hugh O´Flaherty Humanitarian Award in 2011.In July 2017, she was conferred with an honorary Doctor of Law degree by the University of Ulster.Paying tribute to O’Neill, President Higgins said: “I was privileged to have her as a friend and will never forget the brilliant guidance and assistance she provided on so many occasions and in so many places. She will be missed by so many, but must acutely by her family, her wide circle of friends and her former colleagues in Trócaire. Following her retirement, Sally continued to work in a voluntary capacity as a facilitator with prisoners and migrants in Honduras, where she lived.  “Our hearts go out to Sally’s family, particularly her children Roger, Rhona and Xio, and her husband Roger,” de Barra said. “Although we still cannot believe she is gone, we know that she left an incredible footprint around the world.”  By Hayley Halpin 6 Comments Her drive, passion and commitment was as strong as ever. Sally was much beloved by communities and human rights activists throughout Central America. She dedicated her life to improving the lives of others. Monday 8 Apr 2019, 5:19 PM Short URL 15,863 Views Sally O’Neill Source: TrócaireTRIBUTES HAVE BEEN paid to Trócaire worker Sally O’Neill after she died in a road accident in Guatemala.O’Neill, from Dungannon, Co Tyrone, had worked for the charity for 37 years. She joined the organisation in 1987 and retired in April 2015. “We are heartbroken by this news. She was a truly remarkable person. Trócaire was only five years old when Sally joined,” Trócaire CEO Caoimhe de Barra said. “Sally built the foundations of the organisation. She embodied our values and, through her courage and commitment to human rights, touched the lives of so many people,” she said. O’Neill worked primarily on Trócaire projects in Latin America, but she was also involved in providing famine relief in Ethiopia in the mid-1980s. She established Trócaire’s programme in Somalia in the early-1990s in response to a famine there. Prior to her retirement, she was Trócaire’s head of region for Latin America, based in Honduras. “I was with Sally last week in Guatemala. Despite having officially retired, she remained a driving force for human rights in Central America,” de Barra said. Share236 Tweet Email4 https://jrnl.ie/4582160 ‘A truly remarkable person’: Tributes paid to Trócaire worker of 37 years Sally O’Neill Through the years, O’Neill worked primarily on Trócaire projects in Latin America. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Child Protection The failure to publish the report into Mother Baby Homes

first_img Share Tweet Email1 IRELAND DOES NOT have a proud history of child protection.  Neither does its treatment of women – as mothers and as citizens – bear close scrutiny.And it seems that history is determined to repeat itself.This week, the Collaborative Forum Report on Mother and Baby Homes was due to be published.The Forum is made up of former residents of the institutions and is separate to the Mother and Baby Homes Commission, which consists of a judge and two academics.  The purpose of the Collaborative Forum is to ensure that those directly impacted have a voice and can contribute fully to the process of investigation, while also making recommendations as to how survivors and their families can be best helped going forward.Their report ran to 90 pages and took more than a year to complete.  Having spoken to some of the members of the Forum, I knew they were very proud of it.On April 13th of this year Katherine Zappone, Minister for Children, called the Collaborative Forum to a meeting at which she informed them that, on the advice of the Attorney General, their report would not be published in full – in fact, only their recommendations would see the light of day.Don’t get me wrong – the recommendations are necessary and important.They deal with things like health and welfare supports for survivors, an amendment to the Adoption Bill, sourcing funding for memorialisation measures such as local history projects on Mother and Baby Homes, and a research programme into the kind of language used in historical reports – a bid to truly express the realities of the lives of women and children caught up in the horrors of such institutions.However, as a way of giving the participants a voice in the process, only publishing the recommendations falls very short indeed.While no explicit reason has yet been given as to why the full document has been withheld, it is believed that the Report of the Collaborative Forum was deeply critical of the conduct of a number of agencies, particularly Tusla, which holds a large cache of records relating to the Mother and Baby Homes.The decision not to publish has been deeply distressing for some forum members, causing one to tender her resignation, stating:I have lost all faith in the forum and I couldn’t agree to recommendations being released without the backing of the report we worked so hard on.Interestingly, on the same day, the Report of the Collaborative Forum was (for want of a better term) censored, a separate report was published by the Commission on burial practices in Mother and Baby Homes.This report, which has been widely described as “shocking”, found that almost 1,000 children who died in mother and baby homes had their bodies donated for medical research. It also raised questions as to the veracity of the accounts provided by Catholic Congregations as to the whereabouts of the dead children, saying that affidavit provided by the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary was “speculative, inaccurate and misleading.”But the report also highlights one big question: its main finding is (literally) that no one knows where the bodies are buried.But the Forum’s report, that remains languishing on the shelves of the Department of Children, may well contain information to the contrary – now it seems that we will never know. What makes all this doubly depressing is that it is not the first time something this has happened.  Oberstown Children’s Detention CampusIn 2016 an Operational Review was commissioned for Oberstown Children’s Detention Campus.  There had been a series of incidents at the unit culminating in a fire that caused severe damage to part of the structure.  Professors Barry Goldson, of the School of Law and Social Justice at the University of Liverpool and Nicholas Hardwick, of the School of Law at Royal Holloway, University of London, were asked to come to Ireland to carry out an extensive review of how the centre was run and make recommendations on how procedures could be improved.  The report was due to be published in late 2017, but before its release, Katherine Zappone received a letter from Professor Ursula Kilkelly, Chairperson of the Board of Oberstown, informing her that publishing the report would result in widespread resignations from the unit and significant legal action.It seemed that various staff members were criticised in the report and while steps were taken to give them a fair hearing, these proved unsuccessful.The report was never published.I contacted the Government Press Office to seek clarification on the exact reasons behind this decision and was informed:“The Board was not in a position to satisfy itself, or the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, that fair procedures had been applied before the report was finalised and submitted. In light of the legal advice and after careful consideration of the matter, it was concluded that it is not appropriate to publish the full report.“However, the recommendations of the report, all of which are at the kernel of how Oberstown Children Detention Campus moves forward, were published in July 2017 and continue to be implemented as part of a significant package of reform in Oberstown.”Sound familiar?What interests me in this instance is that the people carrying out the report were lawyers, who must have been aware of the possible implications of what they were doing, and would have been reporting regularly to the people paying them to carry out this sensitive task, yet no alarm bells went off before publication date.If you go on to the website for the Collaborative Forum on Mother and Baby Homes, you will find minutes of regular meetings as they went about their work – so you have to wonder why no one flagged up any issues before it was too late?In 2018, just after the furore over the unpublished report reached a climax, Oberstown published its own report, suggesting that patterns of detention and the challenges faced by staff were similar to that of adult prisons and that more than half of their clients had mental health needs – nothing to see here, in other words.This was a very different and much more upbeat piece of work than the document that continues to gather dust.And, like with the case of this week’s disturbing report in burial practices, there are still missing parts and questions that remain unanswered.Cover up?The main problem with this consistent withholding of information is that it calls to mind the bad old days.The first proper report into “childcare” institutions in Ireland was the Kennedy Report, which was an investigation into the running of Industrial Schools chaired Miss Justice Kennedy in 1970.In the world of social care and child protection, it is legendary for all the wrong reasons.The Report failed to tackle any of the real problems of these deplorable establishments, most notably the levels of violence and physical abuse the children who were forced to endure daily.  The members of the investigating commission were fully aware of the abuse (discussions of it can be found in the minutes of their meetings) but not a single mention of these tortures ever made it into the final document.  In other words, the unsavoury information, the material likely to cause trouble for those involved, was hidden away.Just like in these most recent reports.I have no problem with due process, but when this gets in the way of truth and allows a culture of secrecy and collusion to continue, then we need to re-evaluate.  If we don’t, we have learned nothing from the pain of the past.Shane Dunphy is a child protection expert and author.  He is Head of the Social Care Department at Waterford College of Further Education.  52 Comments By Shane Dunphy Apr 21st 2019, 8:31 PM Shane Dunphy Short URLcenter_img Sunday 21 Apr 2019, 8:30 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Child Protection: The failure to publish the report into Mother & Baby Homes is part of a continued cover-up ‘I have no problem with due process, but when this gets in the way of truth and allows a culture of secrecy and collusion to continue, then we need to re-evaluate’, writes Shane Dunphy. https://jrnl.ie/4599753 15,261 Views last_img read more

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Dublin City Council planning new pedestrian and cycleonly bridge across the River

first_img Jun 12th 2018, 8:40 AM By Hayley Halpin Share129 Tweet Email Tuesday 12 Jun 2018, 8:40 AM Dublin City Council planning new pedestrian and cycle-only bridge across the River Liffey The council is proposing the Blood Stoney Bridge to cross the River Liffey in the Dublin Dockland Area. 28 Comments DUBLIN CITY COUNCIL has begun planning for a new pedestrian and cycle-only bridge across the River Liffey.In a statement to TheJournal.ie, the council said the proposed Blood Stoney Bridge will provide a new crossing point from New Wapping Street to Blood Stoney Road in the Dublin Dockland Area and will be a pedestrian and cycling-only facility.The bridge will have a full segregated cycleway with footpaths on either side and will tie in with the proposed Liffey cycle route, according to the council. The bridge will act as an opening bridge to allow river traffic to pass through when required.“The Dublin Dockland Area has been designated a Strategic Development Zone and is going through a period of significant investment. This includes major improvements to infrastructure and the creation of new business and residential zones within the historically industrial docklands,” the council said.“There is clear requirement for new pedestrian and cyclist facilities to not only meet current needs but also provide for the future infrastructure requirements in the area as other strategic developments are completed.”Planning stageDublin City Council said the bridge is “currently at the preliminary design stage”.Construction work is due to commence on the bridge in winter 2019.In a tendering document online, Dublin City Council has said it is currently seeking a contractor to carry out a ground investigation contract for the bridge.The investigation works will involve excavations, geophysical surveys, associated temporary traffic management, laboratory testing and the production of a factual ground investigation and contamination assessment report.The investigation is required to inform the future development of the bridge, the council said.“Blood Stoney Bridge is envisaged as being a continuation of the Campshire environment for cyclists and pedestrians. The engineering elements of the bridge will be incorporated with an architectural sensitivity to provide a continuity of character for people to experience along the Campshires that celebrates Dublin’s engineering heritage,” Dublin City Council said. Short URLcenter_img Image: Sam Boal via RollingNews.ie Dublin Docklands along the River Liffey http://jrnl.ie/4065982 17,178 Views Dublin Docklands along the River Liffey Image: Sam Boal via RollingNews.ie Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Five star Dublin make AllIreland history with replay win over Kerry

first_img By Fintan O’Toole Sat 7:52 PM 45,285 Views Dublin players celebrate at the final whistle. Image: Billy Stickland/INPHO Dublin players celebrate at the final whistle. Image: Billy Stickland/INPHO Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 231 Comments https://the42.ie/4808774 Share63 Tweet Email2 Fintan O’Toole Five star! Dublin make All-Ireland history with replay win over Kerry A full house at Croke Park for today’s clash. Dublin 1-18Kerry 0-15HISTORY WAS MADE under the Saturday night lights, Dublin’s All-Ireland dance of celebration as a seismic moment for the sport took place.Darby’s goal struck down Kerry in 1982. Lar’s hat-trick had halted Kilkenny in 2010. Two attempts were necessary in 2019 but ultimately Dublin were assured and got the job done. Five-in-a-row wrapped up as they grasped Sam Maguire for the seventh time this decade. Six points in it at the finish, Dublin getting their business done in the second half of a game that was balanced on a knife edge at the break when the teams were locked at 0-10 apiece.The defining moment arrived when many were returning to their seats after that absorbing opening period. Eoin Murchan was the unlikely scoring source for Dublin, a defender parachuted into their starting line-up who provided a marvellous goal that broke this game open.He had been detailed to police Sean O’Shea but bounded forward to gather the second-half throw-in from a loose punch by David Moran and then accelerated straight down the central corridor of the Kerry defence.Once he approached Shane Ryan’s goalmouth, the Na Fianna man’s composure was admirable as he planted his shot to the net. It was a critical intervention but 20 minutes later his evening ended in pain as he was carted off in clear discomfort after shipping a knock to the leg. He had made his mark though, the only goal of the evening was telling.Con O’Callaghan kicked a point an instant later but Kerry did fight back. They reeled off three points in the trot and by the 45th minute were only one adrift, 1-11 to 0-13. That was the closest they came to the champions on the scoreboard, their sharpness and accuracy eluding them in front of goal in the second half.They only chalked 0-5 on the board after the interval, a bunch of shots going away from a goal, a few more attacks breaking down and a path to goal obstructed by Stephen Cluxton in the 53rd minute as he stood tall to divert Stephen O’Brien’s piledriver away. Dean Rock supplied the last two points of the match, the insurance scores that copperfastened the success for Dublin. Their advantage could have swelled further but Diarmuid Connolly was denied by a fine late save from Shane Ryan.The first half was simply a joy to watch. 20 points split evenly between the sides, the exchanges lit up by shooting of a staggeringly high standard.Dublin had set the tone early, exploding from the blocks. Their eye was in early in front of goal. Con O’Callaghan, Ciaran Kilkenny and Paul Mannion had all snapped over points inside three minutes. Dublin created what looked a sizeable gap by the 8th minute, 0-5 to 0-1, that trio of marquee forwards continuing to drive them on.But Kerry gradually grew in stature, powered by their own lethal attacking combo of David Clifford and Paul Geaney. Between that quintet of attackers notched a combined 0-14 in the first half. It was terrific stuff.A packed house settled in for a rip-roaring second-half yet once Murchan cut through and raised that green flag, Dublin were in the ascendancy. The sense of inevitability grew about the outcome as the second half unfolded.Jim Gavin’s side at the summit as another championship concludes.Scorers for Dublin: Ciaran Kilkenny, Con O’Callaghan, Paul Mannion 0-4 each, Dean Rock 0-3 (0-1 ’45), Eoin Murchan 1-0, David Byrne, James McCarthy, Niall Scully 0-1 each.Scorers for Kerry: Seán O’Shea (0-3f), David Clifford (0-1f) 0-5 each, Paul Geaney 0-4, Adrian Spillane 0-1.Dublin1. Stephen Cluxton (Parnells – captain)24. Eoin Murchan (Na Fianna)4. Michael Fitzsimons (Cuala)2. David Byrne (Naomh Olaf)7. John Small (Ballymun Kickhams)3. Jonny Cooper (Na Fianna)5. Jack McCaffrey (Clontarf)6. James McCarthy (Ballymun Kickhams)8. Brian Fenton (Raheny)10. Niall Scully (Templeogue Synge Street)11. Ciarán Kilkenny (Castleknock)12. Brian Howard (Raheny)13. Paul Mannion (Kilmacud Crokes)14. Con O’Callaghan (Cuala)15. Dean Rock (Ballymun Kickhams) Reports from Croke Park Subs19. Diarmuid Connolly (St Vincent’s) for McCaffrey (half-time)22. Philly McMahon (Ballymun Kickhams) for Murchan (inj) (55)20. Cormac Costello (Whitehall Colmcille) for Scully (58)25. Cian O’Sullivan (Kilmacud Crokes) for Byrne (68)23. Kevin McManamon (St Judes) for Mannion (68)9. Michael Darragh MacAuley (Ballyboden St Enda’s) for Howard (74)Kerry1. Shane Ryan (Rathmore)2. Jason Foley (Ballydonoghue)4. Tom O’Sullivan (Dingle)3. Tadhg Morley (Templenoe)5. Paul Murphy (Rathmore)6. Gavin Crowley (Templenoe)7. Brian Ó Beaglaoich (An Ghaeltacht)8. David Moran (Kerins O’Rahilly’s)9. Jack Barry (Na Gaeil)23. Diarmuid O’Connor (Na Gaeil)11. Sean O’Shea (Kenmare)15. Adrian Spillane (Templenoe)13. David Clifford (Fossa)14. Paul Geaney (Dingle)12. Stephen O’Brien (Kenmare)Subs10. Gavin White (Dr Crokes) for Adrian Spillane (51)19. Jack Sherwood (Firies) for Ó Beaglaoich (51)21. Tommy Walsh (Kerins O’Rahilly’s) for O’Connor (55)18. Killian Spillane (Templenoe) for Murphy (inj) (59)26. James O’Donoghue (Killarney Legion) for Barry (64)20. Dara Moynihan (Spa) for Crowley (71)Referee: Conor Lane (Banteer) Short URL Saturday 14 Sep 2019, 7:52 PMlast_img read more

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Kalisperis honoured for work helping migrants

first_imgThe Brotherhood of St Laurence has honoured the founding father of the Ecumenical Migration Centre (EMC) Johnny Kalisperis in a tribute last Saturday. Kalisperis made settling in Australia for many migrants who were under his aid a positive and significant change. His work in the early wave of migration illustrates the challenges faced and the issues for multiculturalism in Australia then. Born on the island of Cos, Kalisperis migrated to Australia in 1960. As manager of the first EMC club centre, and espresso bar, in North Carlton, Kalisperis and his partner Savas Augoustakis, went into the business of community based help for ethnic migrants. The centre was a bustling hub of men and women migrants largely of Greek origin and Southern Europeans all needing help. His work in the 1970s focused on the welfare focus of the Greek community. As the sole full-time worker of the Greek unit of the EMC, he remained incredibly active within the Greek community in Melbourne. His exceptional counselling skills were recognised in 1977 by the Victorian Council of Social Services for the Community Services Award. He was the first ethnic worker to be recognised for this work. During the 1980s, Kalisperis worked on supporting the youth program of the Australian Greek Welfare Society, the Migration Rehabilitation Advisory Committee and the Consultative Committee on Social Welfare for the Department of Social Security and the Greek Welfare Workers Association. In the 1990s and until his retirement in 2000, the issues faced within his discipline had shifted. During this time, he maintained strong ties with the Australian Greek Welfare Society and served on the Greek committee of the EMC dealing with social security rights and reciprocal agreements between Australia and Greece. Over the four decades Kalisperis dedicated to social justice and rights, he remained a widely respected and dearly loved man in not only the Greek community, but beyond. His contribution to multiculturalism in Australia is phenomenal. At his farewell from the EMC in 2000, the chair of the EMC Basil Varghese said that Kalisperis possessed “extraordinary wisdom and deep understanding for the common good” and “understood the pains and joys of migrants and refugees”. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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